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Auteur Coll, M.; Steenbeek, J.; Sole, J.; Palomera, I.; Christensen, V. doi  openurl
  Titre Modelling the cumulative spatial-temporal effects of environmental drivers and fishing in a NW Mediterranean marine ecosystem Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Model.  
  Volume 331 Numéro Pages (down) 100-114  
  Mots-Clés acoustic estimation; anchovy engraulis-encrasicolus; climate-change; Cumulative effects; Ecopath with Ecosim; environment; european hake; exploited ecosystems; fishing; food-web model; food webs; hake merluccius-merluccius; protected areas; south catalan sea; trawling disturbance  
  Résumé To realistically predict spatial-temporal dynamics of species in marine ecosystems it is essential to consider environmental conditions in conjunction with human activities and food web dynamics. In this study, we used Ecospace, the spatial-temporal dynamic module of Ecopath with Ecosim (EwE) food web model, to drive a spatially explicit marine food web model representing the Southern Catalan Sea (NW Mediterranean) with various environmental drivers and with fishing. We then evaluated the individual and joint effects of environmental conditions and fishing in various compartments of the food web. First we used a previously developed EwE model fitted to time series of data from 1978 to 2010 as a baseline configuration. The model included 40 functional groups and four fishing fleets. We first ran the original Ecospace spatial-temporal dynamic model using the original habitat configuration, in addition to fishing, and we predicted species distributions and abundances. Afterwards, we ran the new habitat foraging capacity model using the most important environmental drivers linked with the Ebro River delta dynamics (salinity, temperature, and primary production), in addition to depth, substrate and fishing, and we compared results with those from the original implementation of Ecospace. Three commercial species, European hake (Merluccius merluccius), anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) and sardine (Sardina pilchardus), were used to analyse results. Species distributions more closely matched the empirical information available from the study area when using the new habitat capacity model. Results suggested that the historical impacts of fishing and environmental conditions on the biomass and distributions of hake, anchovy and sardine were not additive, but mainly cumulative with a synergistic or antagonistic effect. Fishing had the highest impact on spatial modelling results while the spatial distribution of primary producers and depth followed in importance. This study contributes to the development of more reliable predictions of regional change in marine ecosystems of the Mediterranean Sea. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0304-3800 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1643  
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Auteur Deininger, A.; Faithfull, C.L.; Lange, K.; Bayer, T.; Vidussi, F.; Liess, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Simulated terrestrial runoff triggered a phytoplankton succession and changed seston stoichiometry in coastal lagoon mesocosms Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Environ. Res.  
  Volume 119 Numéro Pages (down) 40-50  
  Mots-Clés climate change; communities; community composition; Diatoms; dynamics; ecosystems; events; food-web; growth; Mediterranean; Mesocosm; Phytoplankton; plankton; productivity; river flash-flood; schelde; soil; Stoichiometry; Thau lagoon  
  Résumé Climate change scenarios predict intensified terrestrial storm runoff, providing coastal ecosystems with large nutrient pulses and increased turbidity, with unknown consequences for the phytoplankton community. We conducted a 12-day mesocosm experiment in the Mediterranean Thau Lagoon (France), adding soil (simulated runoff) and fish (different food webs) in a 2 x 2 full factorial design and monitored phytoplankton composition, shade adaptation and stoichiometry. Diatoms (Chaetoceros) increased fourfold immediately after soil addition, prymnesiophytes and dinoflagellates peaked after six- and 12 days, respectively. Soil induced no phytoplanlcton shade adaptation. Fish reduced the positive soil effect on dinoflagellates (Scripsiella, Glenodinium), and diatom abundance in general. Phytoplankton community composition drove seston stoichiometry. In conclusion, pulsed terrestrial runoff can cause rapid, low quality (high carbon: nutrient) diatom blooms. However, bloom duration may be short and reduced in magnitude by fish. Thus, climate change may shift shallow coastal ecosystems towards famine or feast dynamics. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0141-1136 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2063  
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Auteur Valls, A.; Coll, M.; Christensen, V. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Keystone species : toward an operational concept for marine biodiversity conservation Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Ecological Monographs Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 85 Numéro 1 Pages (down) 29-47  
  Mots-Clés classification tree; Ecopath model; food-web structure; index of keystoneness; keystone species; marine ecosystems; Meta-analysis; mixed-trophic impact; rank correlation tests; scoring method  
  Résumé Various definitions and indices have been proposed in the literature to identify keystone species. In this study, we intended to make the concept of keystone species operational for marine biodiversity conservation. We used an exclusive definition of keystone species, based on the original concept of keystone predator, and derived a new functional index of keystoneness (KS) from an ecosystem-modeling approach. First, several KS indices were formulated, by combining measures of the mixed-trophic impact (MTI) and biomass of species. Then, a meta-analysis was performed, based on 101 published Ecopath food-web models, selected with a scoring method, and representative of the variety of marine ecosystems worldwide. The indices were applied to the models, and two statistical methods were compared to select the most promising KS index. Rank correlation tests were performed to assess the balance between the contribution of the impact and biomass components to the different KS indices. In addition, a classification tree was implemented, based on ecosystem-specific thresholds applied to the latter species traits, and used to confirm the identified keystone species. The selected index obtained the highest number of models with positive results from both the rank correlation tests and the classification tree. We also demonstrated the limitations of existing KS indices previously applied in the literature. Species were ranked according to their estimates of keystoneness with the selected KS index, so that potential keystone species were quantitatively identified in the 101 modeled food webs. The standardized modeling approach allowed for a comparison of the identified keystone species across models: cartilaginous fishes and toothed whales obtained the highest occurrences. Finally, the selected KS index was applied to the well-known case study of Prince William Sound (Alaska, USA). Potentially significant anthropogenic (fishing) impacts on keystone species were also considered and discussed. The operational methodology presented is directly applicable to marine food webs, and may be adapted to other (freshwater or terrestrial) systems.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0012-9615 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1114  
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Auteur Albo-Puigserver, M.; Navarro, J.; Coll, M.; Layman, C.A.; Palomera, I. doi  openurl
  Titre Trophic structure of pelagic species in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Appl. Dev. Psychol.  
  Volume 47 Numéro Pages (down) 27-35  
  Mots-Clés anchovy engraulis-encrasicolus; biscay northeast atlantic; Community structure; diet composition; food-web; Food web; hake merluccius-merluccius; horse mackerel; Isotopic niche; mackerel scomber-japonicus; Pelagic fish; sardine sardina-pilchardus; Seasonal; seasonal-changes; Stable isotopes; stable-isotopes; Trophic segregation  
  Résumé Ecological knowledge of food web interactions within pelagic marine communities is often limited, impairing our capabilities to manage these ecologically and economically important marine fish species. Here we used stable isotope analyses to investigate trophic interactions in the pelagic ecosystem of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea during 2012 and 2013. Our results suggest that European sardine, Sardina pilchardus, and anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus, are consumers located at relatively low levels of the pelagic food web. Unexpectedly, the round sardinella, Sardinella aurita, appeared to be located at a higher trophic level than the other small pelagic fish species, although previous studies found similarity in their diets. Isotope data suggested that trophic niches of species within the genera Trachurus spp. and Scomber spp., were distinct. Atlantic bonito Sarda sarda, European hake Merluccius merluccius and European squid Loligo vulgaris, appeared to feed at higher trophic levels than other species. Despite some intraspecific seasonal variability for some species, community trophic structure appeared relatively stable through the year. These data provide an important step for developing models of food web dynamics in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0193-3973 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1691  
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Auteur Meddeb, M.; Grami, B.; Chaalali, A.; Haraldsson, M.; Niquil, N.; Pringault, O.; Sakka Hlaili, A. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Plankton food-web functioning in anthropogenically impacted coastal waters (SW Mediterranean Sea): an ecological network analysis Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Progress in Oceanography  
  Volume Numéro Pages (down)  
  Mots-Clés Ecological Network Analysis; Food-web modelling; Mediterranean coastal waters; plankton ecology  
  Résumé The study is the first attempt to (i) model spring food webs in three SW Mediterranean ecosystems which are under different anthropogenic pressures and (ii) to project the consequence of this stress on their function. Linear inverse models were built using the Monte Carlo method coupled with Markov Chains to characterize the food-web status of the Lagoon, the Channel (inshore waters under high eutrophication and chemical contamination) and the Bay of Bizerte (offshore waters under less anthropogenic pressure). Ecological network analysis was used for the description of structural and functional properties of each food web and for inter-ecosystem comparisons. Our results showed that more carbon was produced by phytoplankton in the inshore waters (966–1234 mg C m-2 d-1) compared to the Bay (727 mg C m-2 d-1). The total ecosystem carbon inputs into the three food webs was supported by high primary production, which was mainly due to >10µm algae. However, the three carbon pathways were characterized by low detritivory and a high herbivory which was mainly assigned to protozooplankton. This latter was efficient in channelling biogenic carbon. In the Lagoon and the Channel, foods webs acted almost as a multivorous structure with a tendency towards herbivorous one, whereas in the Bay the herbivorous pathway was more dominant. Ecological indices revealed that the Lagoon and the Channel food webs/systems had high total system throughput and thus were more active than the Bay. The Bay food web, which had a high relative ascendency value, was more organized and specialized. This inter–ecosystem difference could be due to the varying levels of anthropogenic impact among sites. Indeed, the low value of Finn’s cycling index indicated that the three systems are disturbed, but the Lagoon and the Channel, with low average path lengths, appeared to be more stressed, as both sites have undergone higher chemical pollution and nutrient loading. This study shows that ecosystem models combined with ecological indices provide a powerful approach to detect change in environmental status and anthropogenic impacts.  
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  ISSN 0079-6611 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2292  
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