bascule de visibilité Search & Display Options

Tout Sélectionner    Désélectionner
 |   | 
Détails
   print
  Enregistrements Liens
Auteur Rossi, F.; Baeta, A.; Marques, J.C. doi  openurl
  Titre Stable isotopes reveal habitat-related diet shifts in facultative deposit-feeders Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Sea Res.  
  Volume 95 Numéro Pages 172-179  
  Mots-Clés Benthos; burying depth; carbon; Estuaries; estuarine habitats; food-web; Macrofauna; marine; polychaete nereis-diversicolor; scrobicularia-plana; Seagrass; seagrass meadows; Sediment; water-flow; zostera-noltii  
  Résumé Seagrass patches interspersed in a sediment matrix may vary environmental conditions and affect feeding habits of consumers and food-web structure. This paper investigates diet shifts between bare sediments and a Zostera noltei (Hornemann, 1832) meadow for three facultative deposit-feeding macrofaunal consumers, notably the bivalve Scrobicularia piano (da Costa, 1778), the polychaete Hediste diversicolor (O.T. Muller, 1776), and the gastropod Hydrobia ulvae (Pennant, 1778). In July 2008, one eelgrass meadow and two bare sediment locations were chosen in the Mondego estuary (40 degrees 08" N, 8 degrees 50'W, Portugal) and sampled for stable isotope signatures (delta C-13 and delta N-15) of macrofauna consumers and some of their potential basal food sources, such as sedimentary organic matter (SOM), microphytobenthos (MPB), seagrass shoots, leaves and seaweeds laying on the surface sediment. The delta N-15 of H. diversicolor was 3% higher in the eelgrass meadow than in bare sediment, indicating a change of trophic position, whereas the Bayesian stable-isotope mixing model showed that S. piano assimilated more macroalgal detritus than microphytobenthos in the eelgrass bed. Such habitat-related diet shifts have the potential to change structure and spatial dynamics of benthic food webs. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition (up)  
  ISSN 1385-1101 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1549  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Deininger, A.; Faithfull, C.L.; Lange, K.; Bayer, T.; Vidussi, F.; Liess, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Simulated terrestrial runoff triggered a phytoplankton succession and changed seston stoichiometry in coastal lagoon mesocosms Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Environ. Res.  
  Volume 119 Numéro Pages 40-50  
  Mots-Clés climate change; communities; community composition; Diatoms; dynamics; ecosystems; events; food-web; growth; Mediterranean; Mesocosm; Phytoplankton; plankton; productivity; river flash-flood; schelde; soil; Stoichiometry; Thau lagoon  
  Résumé Climate change scenarios predict intensified terrestrial storm runoff, providing coastal ecosystems with large nutrient pulses and increased turbidity, with unknown consequences for the phytoplankton community. We conducted a 12-day mesocosm experiment in the Mediterranean Thau Lagoon (France), adding soil (simulated runoff) and fish (different food webs) in a 2 x 2 full factorial design and monitored phytoplankton composition, shade adaptation and stoichiometry. Diatoms (Chaetoceros) increased fourfold immediately after soil addition, prymnesiophytes and dinoflagellates peaked after six- and 12 days, respectively. Soil induced no phytoplanlcton shade adaptation. Fish reduced the positive soil effect on dinoflagellates (Scripsiella, Glenodinium), and diatom abundance in general. Phytoplankton community composition drove seston stoichiometry. In conclusion, pulsed terrestrial runoff can cause rapid, low quality (high carbon: nutrient) diatom blooms. However, bloom duration may be short and reduced in magnitude by fish. Thus, climate change may shift shallow coastal ecosystems towards famine or feast dynamics. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition (up)  
  ISSN 0141-1136 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2063  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Galiana, N.; Lurgi, M.; Claramunt-Lopez, B.; Fortin, M.-J.; Leroux, S.; Cazelles, K.; Gravel, D.; Montoya, J.M. doi  openurl
  Titre The spatial scaling of species interaction networks Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Ecol. Evol.  
  Volume 2 Numéro 5 Pages 782-790  
  Mots-Clés area relationships; biodiversity; competition; diversity; ecological networks; extinction; food-web structure; habitat loss; source-sink metacommunities; trophic interactions  
  Résumé Species-area relationships (SARs) are pivotal to understand the distribution of biodiversity across spatial scales. We know little, however, about how the network of biotic interactions in which biodiversity is embedded changes with spatial extent. Here we develop a new theoretical framework that enables us to explore how different assembly mechanisms and theoretical models affect multiple properties of ecological networks across space. We present a number of testable predictions on network-area relationships (NARs) for multi-trophic communities. Network structure changes as area increases because of the existence of different SARs across trophic levels, the preferential selection of generalist species at small spatial extents and the effect of dispersal limitation promoting beta-diversity. Developing an understanding of NARs will complement the growing body of knowledge on SARs with potential applications in conservation ecology. Specifically, combined with further empirical evidence, NARs can generate predictions of potential effects on ecological communities of habitat loss and fragmentation in a changing world.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition (up)  
  ISSN 2397-334x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2339  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Canard, E.F.; Mouquet, N.; Mouillot, D.; Stanko, M.; Miklisova, D.; Gravel, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Empirical Evaluation of Neutral Interactions in Host-Parasite Networks Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée American Naturalist  
  Volume 183 Numéro 4 Pages 468-479  
  Mots-Clés abundance; animal mutualistic networks; community; dissimilarity; effort; food-web structure; geographical variation; host-parasite network; network structure; neutrality; null model; phylogenetic signal; reconciling niche; sampling; scale-dependence; species abundance distribution  
  Résumé While niche-based processes have been invoked extensively to explain the structure of interaction networks, recent studies propose that neutrality could also be of great importance. Under the neutral hypothesis, network structure would simply emerge from random encounters between individuals and thus would be directly linked to species abundance. We investigated the impact of species abundance distributions on qualitative and quantitative metrics of 113 host-parasite networks. We analyzed the concordance between neutral expectations and empirical observations at interaction, species, and network levels. We found that species abundance accurately predicts network metrics at all levels. Despite host-parasite systems being constrained by physiology and immunology, our results suggest that neutrality could also explain, at least partially, their structure. We hypothesize that trait matching would determine potential interactions between species, while abundance would determine their realization.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition (up)  
  ISSN 0003-0147 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 573  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Albouy, C.; Velez, L.; Coll, M.; Colloca, F.; Le Loc'h, F.; Mouillot, D.; Gravel, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre From projected species distribution to food-web structure under climate change Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Change Biology  
  Volume 20 Numéro 3 Pages 730-741  
  Mots-Clés climate change; connectance; fish body size; food-webs; generality; Mediterranean Sea; metaweb; niche model; vulnerability  
  Résumé  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition (up)  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 324  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
Tout Sélectionner    Désélectionner
 |   | 
Détails
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: