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Auteur Villeger, S.; Brosse, S.; Mouchet, M.; Mouillot, D.; Vanni, M.J. doi  openurl
  Titre Functional ecology of fish: current approaches and future challenges Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquat. Sci.  
  Volume 79 Numéro 4 Pages 783-801  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; centrarchid fishes; coral-reef fishes; dietary-morphological relationships; ecosystem processes; Ecosystem services; fish; food-web; fresh-water fish; functional trait; global change; labrid fishes; life-history strategies; ocean; phosphorus-limitation; population regulation; river  
  Résumé Fish communities face increasing anthropogenic pressures in freshwater and marine ecosystems that modify their biodiversity and threaten the services they supply to human populations. To address these issues, studies have been increasingly focusing on functions of fish that are linked to their main ecological roles in aquatic ecosystems. Fish are indeed known to control other organisms through predation, mediate nutrient fluxes, and can act as ecosystem engineers. Here for each of the key functions played by fish, we present the functional traits that have already been used to assess them. We include traits measurable from observations on living individuals, morphological features measured on preserved organisms or traits categorized using information from the literature, and we discuss their respective advantages and limitations. We then list future research directions to foster a more complete functional approach for fish ecology that needs to incorporate functional traits describing, food provisioning and cultural services while accounting more frequently for intraspecific variability. Finally, we highlight ecological and evolutionary questions that could be addressed using meta-analyses of large trait databases, and how a trait-based framework could provide valuable insights on the mechanistic links between global changes, functional diversity of fish assemblages, and ecosystem services.  
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  ISSN 1015-1621 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2211  
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Auteur Albo-Puigserver, M.; Navarro, J.; Coll, M.; Aguzzi, J.; Cardona, L.; Saez-Liante, R. doi  openurl
  Titre Feeding ecology and trophic position of three sympatric demersal chondrichthyans in the northwestern Mediterranean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 524 Numéro Pages 255-268  
  Mots-Clés Chimaera monstrosa; chimera-monstrosa; discrimination factors; Etmopterus spinax; etmopterus-spinax linnaeus; Feeding niche; fishing impacts; food-web; Galeus melastomus; galeus-melastomus; interpreting stable-isotopes; Isotope analysis; Mediterranean Sea; portuguese continental-slope; sea; top predators  
  Résumé Understanding how marine predators interact is a scientific challenge. In marine ecosystems, segregation in feeding habits has been largely described as a common mechanism to allow the coexistence of several competing marine predators. However, little is known about the feeding ecology of most species of chondrichthyans, which play a pivotal role in the structure of marine food webs worldwide. In this study, we examined the trophic ecology of 3 relatively abundant chondrichthyans coexisting in the Mediterranean Sea: the blackmouth catshark Galeus melastomus, the velvet belly lanternshark Etmopterus spinax and the rabbit fish Chimaera monstrosa. To examine their trophic ecology and interspecific differences in food habits, we combined the analysis of stomach content and stable isotopes. Our results highlighted a trophic segregation between C. monstrosa and the other 2 species. G. melastomus showed a diet composed mainly of cephalopods, while E. spinax preyed mainly on shrimps and C. monstrosa on crabs. Interspecific differences in the trophic niche were likely due to different feeding capabilities and body size. Each species showed different isotopic niche space and trophic level. Specifically, C. monstrosa showed a higher trophic level than E. spinax and G. melastomus. The high trophic levels of the 3 species highlighted their important role as predators in the marine food web. Our results illustrate the utility of using complementary approaches that provide information about the feeding behaviour at short (stomach content) and long-term scales (stable isotopes), which could allow more efficient monitoring of marine food-web changes in the study area.  
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  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1245  
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Auteur Shannon, L.J.; Coll, M.; Yemane, D.; Jouffre, D.; Neira, S.; Bertrand, A.; Diaz, E.; Shin, Y.J. url  doi
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  Titre Comparing data-based indicators across upwelling and comparable systems for communicating ecosystem states and trends Type Article scientifique
  Année 2010 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 67 Numéro 4 Pages 807-832  
  Mots-Clés adriatic sea; central chile; comparative approach; demersal resources; fishing impacts; food-web; global fisheries; humboldt current system; indicator; nw mediterranean sea; pelagic fish; regime shifts; southern benguela; upwelling  
  Résumé Shannon, L. J., Coll, M., Yemane, D., Jouffre, D., Neira, S., Bertrand, A., Diaz, E., and Shin, Y-J. 2010. Comparing data-based indicators across upwelling and comparable systems for communicating ecosystem states and trends. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 67: 807-832.  
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  ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 482  
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Auteur Rossi, F.; Baeta, A.; Marques, J.C. doi  openurl
  Titre Stable isotopes reveal habitat-related diet shifts in facultative deposit-feeders Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Sea Res.  
  Volume 95 Numéro Pages 172-179  
  Mots-Clés Benthos; burying depth; carbon; Estuaries; estuarine habitats; food-web; Macrofauna; marine; polychaete nereis-diversicolor; scrobicularia-plana; Seagrass; seagrass meadows; Sediment; water-flow; zostera-noltii  
  Résumé Seagrass patches interspersed in a sediment matrix may vary environmental conditions and affect feeding habits of consumers and food-web structure. This paper investigates diet shifts between bare sediments and a Zostera noltei (Hornemann, 1832) meadow for three facultative deposit-feeding macrofaunal consumers, notably the bivalve Scrobicularia piano (da Costa, 1778), the polychaete Hediste diversicolor (O.T. Muller, 1776), and the gastropod Hydrobia ulvae (Pennant, 1778). In July 2008, one eelgrass meadow and two bare sediment locations were chosen in the Mondego estuary (40 degrees 08" N, 8 degrees 50'W, Portugal) and sampled for stable isotope signatures (delta C-13 and delta N-15) of macrofauna consumers and some of their potential basal food sources, such as sedimentary organic matter (SOM), microphytobenthos (MPB), seagrass shoots, leaves and seaweeds laying on the surface sediment. The delta N-15 of H. diversicolor was 3% higher in the eelgrass meadow than in bare sediment, indicating a change of trophic position, whereas the Bayesian stable-isotope mixing model showed that S. piano assimilated more macroalgal detritus than microphytobenthos in the eelgrass bed. Such habitat-related diet shifts have the potential to change structure and spatial dynamics of benthic food webs. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.  
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  ISSN 1385-1101 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1549  
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Auteur Valls, A.; Coll, M.; Christensen, V. url  doi
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  Titre Keystone species : toward an operational concept for marine biodiversity conservation Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Ecological Monographs Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 85 Numéro 1 Pages 29-47  
  Mots-Clés classification tree; Ecopath model; food-web structure; index of keystoneness; keystone species; marine ecosystems; Meta-analysis; mixed-trophic impact; rank correlation tests; scoring method  
  Résumé Various definitions and indices have been proposed in the literature to identify keystone species. In this study, we intended to make the concept of keystone species operational for marine biodiversity conservation. We used an exclusive definition of keystone species, based on the original concept of keystone predator, and derived a new functional index of keystoneness (KS) from an ecosystem-modeling approach. First, several KS indices were formulated, by combining measures of the mixed-trophic impact (MTI) and biomass of species. Then, a meta-analysis was performed, based on 101 published Ecopath food-web models, selected with a scoring method, and representative of the variety of marine ecosystems worldwide. The indices were applied to the models, and two statistical methods were compared to select the most promising KS index. Rank correlation tests were performed to assess the balance between the contribution of the impact and biomass components to the different KS indices. In addition, a classification tree was implemented, based on ecosystem-specific thresholds applied to the latter species traits, and used to confirm the identified keystone species. The selected index obtained the highest number of models with positive results from both the rank correlation tests and the classification tree. We also demonstrated the limitations of existing KS indices previously applied in the literature. Species were ranked according to their estimates of keystoneness with the selected KS index, so that potential keystone species were quantitatively identified in the 101 modeled food webs. The standardized modeling approach allowed for a comparison of the identified keystone species across models: cartilaginous fishes and toothed whales obtained the highest occurrences. Finally, the selected KS index was applied to the well-known case study of Prince William Sound (Alaska, USA). Potentially significant anthropogenic (fishing) impacts on keystone species were also considered and discussed. The operational methodology presented is directly applicable to marine food webs, and may be adapted to other (freshwater or terrestrial) systems.  
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  ISSN 0012-9615 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1114  
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