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Auteur Massol, F.; Altermatt, F.; Gounand, I.; Gravel, D.; Leibold, M.A.; Mouquet, N.
Titre How life-history traits affect ecosystem properties: effects of dispersal in meta-ecosystems Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Oikos
Volume 126 Numéro 4 Pages 532-546
Mots-Clés colonization trade-off; ecological stoichiometry; interaction strengths; neutral metacommunities; pond metacommunities; predator-prey interactions; source-sink metacommunities; species-diversity; terrestrial food webs; theoretical framework
Résumé The concept of life-history traits and the study of these traits are the hallmark of population biology. Acknowledging their variability and evolution has allowed us to understand how species adapt in response to their environment. The same traits are also involved in how species alter ecosystems and shape their dynamics and functioning. Some theories, such as the metabolic theory of ecology, ecological stoichiometry or pace-of-life theory, already recognize this junction, but only do so in an implicitly non-spatial context. Meanwhile, for a decade now, it has been argued that ecosystem properties have to be understood at a larger scale using meta-ecosystem theory because source-sink dynamics, community assembly and ecosystem stability are all modified by spatial structure. Here, we argue that some ecosystem properties can be linked to a single life-history trait, dispersal, i.e. the tendency of organisms to live, compete and reproduce away from their birth place. By articulating recent theoretical and empirical studies linking ecosystem functioning and dynamics to species dispersal, we aim to highlight both the known connections between life-history traits and ecosystem properties and the unknown areas, which deserve further empirical and theoretical developments.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0030-1299 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2120
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Auteur Jacquet, C.; Mouillot, D.; Kulbicki, M.; Gravel, D.
Titre Extensions of Island Biogeography Theory predict the scaling of functional trait composition with habitat area and isolation Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Lett.
Volume 20 Numéro 2 Pages 135-146
Mots-Clés Allometric theory; animal abundance; body-size; body-size distributions; complex food webs; coral-reef fishes; diversity; Ecology; evolution; Food web; global patterns; island biogeography; population-density; species richness; tropical reefs
Résumé The Theory of Island Biogeography (TIB) predicts how area and isolation influence species richness equilibrium on insular habitats. However, the TIB remains silent about functional trait composition and provides no information on the scaling of functional diversity with area, an observation that is now documented in many systems. To fill this gap, we develop a probabilistic approach to predict the distribution of a trait as a function of habitat area and isolation, extending the TIB beyond the traditional species-area relationship. We compare model predictions to the body-size distribution of piscivorous and herbivorous fishes found on tropical reefs worldwide. We find that small and isolated reefs have a higher proportion of large-sized species than large and connected reefs. We also find that knowledge of species body-size and trophic position improves the predictions of fish occupancy on tropical reefs, supporting both the allometric and trophic theory of island biogeography. The integration of functional ecology to island biogeography is broadly applicable to any functional traits and provides a general probabilistic approach to study the scaling of trait distribution with habitat area and isolation.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2087
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Auteur Cazelles, K.; Mouquet, N.; Mouillot, D.; Gravel, D.
Titre On the integration of biotic interaction and environmental constraints at the biogeographical scale Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography
Volume 39 Numéro 10 Pages 921-931
Mots-Clés biodiversity; climate-change; cooccurrence; distributions; ecological communities; evolutionary; food webs; networks; niche; species distribution models
Résumé Biogeography is primarily concerned with the spatial distribution of biodiversity, including performing scenarios in a changing environment. The efforts deployed to develop species distribution models have resulted in predictive tools, but have mostly remained correlative and have largely ignored biotic interactions. Here we build upon the theory of island biogeography as a first approximation to the assembly dynamics of local communities embedded within a metacommunity context. We include all types of interactions and introduce environmental constraints on colonization and extinction dynamics. We develop a probabilistic framework based on Markov chains and derive probabilities for the realization of species assemblages, rather than single species occurrences. We consider the expected distribution of species richness under different types of ecological interactions. We also illustrate the potential of our framework by studying the interplay between different ecological requirements, interactions and the distribution of biodiversity along an environmental gradient. Our framework supports the idea that the future research in biogeography requires a coherent integration of several ecological concepts into a single theory in order to perform conceptual and methodological innovations, such as the switch from single-species distribution to community distribution.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1683
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Auteur Jacquet, C.; Moritz, C.; Morissette, L.; Legagneux, P.; Massol, F.; Archambault, P.; Gravel, D.
Titre No complexity-stability relationship in empirical ecosystems Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Commun.
Volume 7 Numéro Pages 12573
Mots-Clés biodiversity; body-size; connectance; diversity; ecopath; interaction strengths; models; perturbations; real food webs; systems
Résumé Understanding the mechanisms responsible for stability and persistence of ecosystems is one of the greatest challenges in ecology. Robert May showed that, contrary to intuition, complex randomly built ecosystems are less likely to be stable than simpler ones. Few attempts have been tried to test May's prediction empirically, and we still ignore what is the actual complexity-stability relationship in natural ecosystems. Here we perform a stability analysis of 116 quantitative food webs sampled worldwide. We find that classic descriptors of complexity (species richness, connectance and interaction strength) are not associated with stability in empirical food webs. Further analysis reveals that a correlation between the effects of predators on prey and those of prey on predators, combined with a high frequency of weak interactions, stabilize food web dynamics relative to the random expectation. We conclude that empirical food webs have several non-random properties contributing to the absence of a complexity-stability relationship.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1638
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Auteur Chouvelon, T.; Brach-Papa, C.; Auger, D.; Bodin, N.; Bruzac, S.; Crochet, S.; Degroote, M.; Hollanda, S.J.; Hubert, C.; Knoery, J.; Munschy, C.; Puech, A.; Rozuel, E.; Thomas, B.; West, W.; Bourjea, J.; Nikolic, N.
Titre Chemical contaminants (trace metals, persistent organic pollutants) in albacore tuna from western Indian and south-eastern Atlantic Oceans: Trophic influence and potential as tracers of populations Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Total Environ.
Volume 596 Numéro Pages 481-495
Mots-Clés Bioaccumulation; biscay northeast atlantic; enhanced bioaccumulation; feeding ecology; Inorganic elements; Intrinsic markers; marine food webs; mercury concentrations; merluccius-merluccius; Organic contaminants; organochlorine compounds; polychlorinated-biphenyls; stable-isotope analysis; Stable isotopes; thunnus-alalunga; Top predator
Résumé Albacore tuna (Thunnus alalunga) is a highly commercial fish species harvested in the world's Oceans. Identifying the potential links between populations is one of the key tools that can improve the current management across fisheries areas. In addition to characterising populations' contamination state, chemical compounds can help refine foraging areas, individual flows and populations' structure, especially when combined with other intrinsic biogeochemical (trophic) markers such as carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes. This study investigated the bioaccumulation of seven selected trace metals – chromium, nickel, copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg) and lead – in the muscle of 443 albacore tunas, collected over two seasons and/or years in the western Indian Ocean (WIO: Reunion Island and Seychelles) and in the south-eastern Atlantic Ocean (SEAO: South Africa). The main factor that explained metal concentration variability was the geographic origin of fish, rather than the size and the sex of individuals, or the season/year of sampling. The elements Cu, Zn, Cd and Hg indicated a segregation of the geographic groups most clearly. For similar sized-individuals, tunas from SEAO had significantly higher concentrations in Cu, Zn and Cd, but lower Hg concentrations than those from WIO. Information inferred from the analysis of trophic markers (delta C-13, delta N-15) and selected persistent organic pollutants, as well as information on stomach contents, corroborated the geographical differences obtained by trace metals. It also highlighted the influence of trophic ecology on metal bioaccumulation. Finally, this study evidenced the potential of metals and chemical contaminants in general as tracers, by segregating groups of individuals using different food webs or habitats, to better understand spatial connectivity at the population scale. Limited flows of individuals between the SEAO and the WIO are suggested. Albacore as predatory fish also provided some information on environmental and food web chemical contamination in the different study areas. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2139
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