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Auteur Lotze, H.K.; Tittensor, D.P.; Bryndum-Buchholz, A.; Eddy, T.D.; Cheung, W.W.L.; Galbraith, E.D.; Barange, M.; Barrier, N.; Bianchi, D.; Blanchard, J.L.; Bopp, L.; Büchner, M.; Bulman, C.M.; Carozza, D.A.; Christensen, V.; Coll, M.; Dunne, J.P.; Fulton, E.A.; Jennings, S.; Jones, M.C.; Mackinson, S.; Maury, O.; Niiranen, S.; Oliveros-Ramos, R.; Roy, T.; Fernandes, J.A.; Schewe, J.; Shin, Y.-J.; Silva, T.A.M.; Steenbeek, J.; Stock, C.A.; Verley, P.; Volkholz, J.; Walker, N.D.; Worm, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Global ensemble projections reveal trophic amplification of ocean biomass declines with climate change Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Pnas  
  Volume 116 Numéro 26 Pages 12907-12912  
  Mots-Clés climate change impacts; global ecosystem modeling; marine food webs; model intercomparison; uncertainty  
  Résumé While the physical dimensions of climate change are now routinely assessed through multimodel intercomparisons, projected impacts on the global ocean ecosystem generally rely on individual models with a specific set of assumptions. To address these single-model limitations, we present standardized ensemble projections from six global marine ecosystem models forced with two Earth system models and four emission scenarios with and without fishing. We derive average biomass trends and associated uncertainties across the marine food web. Without fishing, mean global animal biomass decreased by 5% (±4% SD) under low emissions and 17% (±11% SD) under high emissions by 2100, with an average 5% decline for every 1 °C of warming. Projected biomass declines were primarily driven by increasing temperature and decreasing primary production, and were more pronounced at higher trophic levels, a process known as trophic amplification. Fishing did not substantially alter the effects of climate change. Considerable regional variation featured strong biomass increases at high latitudes and decreases at middle to low latitudes, with good model agreement on the direction of change but variable magnitude. Uncertainties due to variations in marine ecosystem and Earth system models were similar. Ensemble projections performed well compared with empirical data, emphasizing the benefits of multimodel inference to project future outcomes. Our results indicate that global ocean animal biomass consistently declines with climate change, and that these impacts are amplified at higher trophic levels. Next steps for model development include dynamic scenarios of fishing, cumulative human impacts, and the effects of management measures on future ocean biomass trends.  
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  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0027-8424, 1091-6490 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000472719100059 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2586  
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Auteur Duffy, L.M.; Kuhnert, P.; Pethybridge, H.R.; Young, J.W.; Olson, R.J.; Logan, J.M.; Goñi, N.; Romanov, E.; Allain, V.; Staudinger, M.; Abecassis, M.; Choy, C.A.; Hobday, A.J.; Simier, M.; Galván-Magaña, F.; Potier, M.; Ménard, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Global trophic ecology of yellowfin, bigeye, and albacore tunas: understanding predation on micronekton communities at ocean-basin scales Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography  
  Volume 140 Numéro Pages 55-73  
  Mots-Clés classification trees; climate changes; ecosystems; food webs; inter-ocean comparison; macroecology; Meta-analysis; trophic relationships  
  Résumé Predator-prey interactions for three commercially valuable tuna species: yellowfin (Thunnus albacares), bigeye (T. obesus), and albacore (T. alalunga), collected over a 40-year period from the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic Oceans, were used to quantitatively assess broad, macro-scale trophic patterns in pelagic ecosystems. Analysis of over 14,000 tuna stomachs, using a modified classification tree approach, revealed for the first time the global expanse of pelagic predatory fish diet and global patterns of micronekton diversity. Ommastrephid squids were consistently one of the top prey groups by weight across all tuna species and in most ocean bodies. Interspecific differences in prey were apparent, with epipelagic scombrid and mesopelagic paralepidid fishes globally important for yellowfin and bigeye tunas, respectively, while vertically-migrating euphausiid crustaceans were important for albacore tuna in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Diet diversity showed global and regional patterns among tuna species. In the central and western Pacific Ocean, characterized by low productivity, a high diversity of micronekton prey was consumed while low prey diversity was evident in highly productive coastal waters where upwelling occurs. Spatial patterns of diet diversity were most variable in yellowfin and bigeye tunas while a latitudinal diversity gradient was observed with lower diversity in temperate regions for albacore tuna. Sea-surface temperature was a reasonable predictor of the diets of yellowfin and bigeye tunas, whereas chlorophyll-a was the best environmental predictor of albacore diet. These results suggest that the ongoing expansion of warmer, less productive waters in the world’s oceans may alter foraging opportunities for tunas due to regional changes in prey abundances and compositions.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2102  
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Auteur Mostajir, B.; Amblard, C.; Buffan-Dubau, E.; De Wit, R.; Lensi, R.; Sime-Ngando, T. url  isbn
openurl 
  Titre Microbial Food Webs in Aquatic and Terrestrial Ecosystems Type Chapitre de livre
  Année 2015 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée  
  Volume Numéro Pages 485-509  
  Mots-Clés Biodiversity; Biogeochemical cycles; Ecological interactions; Microbial Ecology; Microbial food webs; Microbial loop  
  Résumé In microbial food webs, different types of interactions occur between microorganisms themselves and with meio- and macroorganisms. After an historical and general introduction, the biological components of the microbial food webs in the pelagic and benthic marine and lake ecosystems, as well as in the terrestrial ecosystems, are presented. The functioning of the microbial food webs in different ecosystems is illustrated and explained, including the trophic pathways and transfer of matter from microbial food webs toward meio- and macroorganisms of the superior trophic levels, the nutrient recycling in the aquatic environments, and the decomposition of organic matter in soils. Finally, the factors regulating microbial food webs, primarily “top-down” and “bottom-up” controls, are described with a special focus on the role of viruses in the aquatic microbial food webs.  
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  Editeur Springer Netherlands Lieu de Publication Éditeur Bertrand, J.-C.; Caumette, P.; Lebaron, P.; Matheron, R.; Normand, P.; Sime-Ngando, T.  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé Environmental Microbiology: Fundamentals and Applications  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-94-017-9117-5 978-94-017-9118-2 Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1394  
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Auteur Campbell, S.J.; Darling, E.S.; Pardede, S.; Ahmadia, G.; Mangubhai, S.; Amkieltiela; Estradivari; Maire, E. doi  openurl
  Titre Fishing restrictions and remoteness deliver conservation outcomes for Indonesia's coral reef fisheries Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Conserv. Lett.  
  Volume Numéro Pages e12698  
  Mots-Clés data-poor fisheries; dynamics; food webs; gear restrictions; management; marine protected areas; small-scale fisheries; South East Asia; targets  
  Résumé Coral reef fisheries depend on reef fish biomass to support ecosystem functioning and sustainable fisheries. Here, we evaluated coral reefs across 4,000 km of the Indonesian archipelago to reveal a large gradient of biomass, from 17,000 kg/ha. Trophic pyramids characterized by planktivore dominance emerged at high biomass, suggesting the importance of pelagic pathways for reef productivity. Total biomass and the biomass of most trophic groups were higher within gear restricted and no-take management, but the greatest biomass was found on unmanaged remote reefs. Within marine protected areas (MPAs), 41.6% and 43.6% of gear restricted and no-take zones, respectively, met a global biomass target of 500 kg/ha, compared with 71.8% of remote sites. To improve conservation outcomes for Indonesia's biodiverse and economically important coral reef fisheries, our results suggest to: (1) strengthen management within Indonesia's existing MPAs and (2) precautionarily manage remote reefs with high biomass.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1755-263x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000510789900001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2733  
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Auteur Cresson, P.; Chouvelon, T.; Bustamante, P.; Bănaru, D.; Baudrier, J.; Le Loc'h, F.; Mauffret, A.; Mialet, B.; Spitz, J.; Wessel, N.; Briand, M.J.; Denamiel, M.; Doray, M.; Guillou, G.; Jadaud, A.; Lazard, C.; Noûs, C.; Prieur, S.; Rouquette, M.; Saraux, C.; Serre, S.; Timmerman, C.-A.; Verin, Y.; Harmelin-Vivien, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Primary production and depth drive different trophic structure and functioning of fish assemblages in French marine ecosystems Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Progress in Oceanography  
  Volume Numéro Pages 102343  
  Mots-Clés benthic-pelagic coupling; fish community; food webs; trophodynamics  
  Résumé Investigating the drivers of fish assemblage trophic structure is a critical question, in order to better understand ecosystem functioning, predict the effects of perturbations and implement integrated management of exploited marine ecosystems. Ecosystemic surveys enabled the determination of the trophic structure of the fish assemblages in three French marine ecosystems, namely the Eastern English Channel, the Bay of Biscay and the Gulf of Lions, through the simultaneous collection of qualitative (stable isotopes and energy content) and quantitative (biomass) data. In the Bay of Biscay and in the Gulf of Lions, pelagic primary production supported at least 80% of the fish biomass production, and explained the dominance of pelagic species, but with differences resulting from the different productivity. The lower productivity in the oligotrophic Gulf of Lions led to a lower total biomass, energy density as well as the predominance of zooplankton feeders. In contrast, fluxes in the Bay of Biscay were sufficient to support a higher biomass of pelagic piscivores, and of species with higher energy content. In the shallow Eastern English Channel, the respective contributions of pelagic and benthic sources were similar. Bentho-demersal species of higher trophic level dominated this assemblage, because of their ability to exploit both pathways. Results of the present study confirmed that fisheries-focused surveys can be used as efficient platforms to address questions about ecosystem functioning. Here it confirmed the expected differences between ecosystems and the importance of primary production and environment as drivers of fish assemblage structure and functioning. Future studies should nevertheless develop new methods to better assess the paramount role of low trophic level consumers.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0079-6611 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2765  
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