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Auteur Mostajir, B.; Amblard, C.; Buffan-Dubau, E.; De Wit, R.; Lensi, R.; Sime-Ngando, T. url  isbn
openurl 
  Titre Microbial Food Webs in Aquatic and Terrestrial Ecosystems Type Chapitre de livre
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée  
  Volume Numéro Pages 485-509  
  Mots-Clés Biodiversity; Biogeochemical cycles; Ecological interactions; Microbial Ecology; Microbial food webs; Microbial loop  
  Résumé (up) In microbial food webs, different types of interactions occur between microorganisms themselves and with meio- and macroorganisms. After an historical and general introduction, the biological components of the microbial food webs in the pelagic and benthic marine and lake ecosystems, as well as in the terrestrial ecosystems, are presented. The functioning of the microbial food webs in different ecosystems is illustrated and explained, including the trophic pathways and transfer of matter from microbial food webs toward meio- and macroorganisms of the superior trophic levels, the nutrient recycling in the aquatic environments, and the decomposition of organic matter in soils. Finally, the factors regulating microbial food webs, primarily “top-down” and “bottom-up” controls, are described with a special focus on the role of viruses in the aquatic microbial food webs.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Springer Netherlands Lieu de Publication Éditeur Bertrand, J.-C.; Caumette, P.; Lebaron, P.; Matheron, R.; Normand, P.; Sime-Ngando, T.  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé Environmental Microbiology: Fundamentals and Applications  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-94-017-9117-5 978-94-017-9118-2 Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1394  
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Auteur Cresson, P.; Chouvelon, T.; Bustamante, P.; Bănaru, D.; Baudrier, J.; Le Loc'h, F.; Mauffret, A.; Mialet, B.; Spitz, J.; Wessel, N.; Briand, M.J.; Denamiel, M.; Doray, M.; Guillou, G.; Jadaud, A.; Lazard, C.; Noûs, C.; Prieur, S.; Rouquette, M.; Saraux, C.; Serre, S.; Timmerman, C.-A.; Verin, Y.; Harmelin-Vivien, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Primary production and depth drive different trophic structure and functioning of fish assemblages in French marine ecosystems Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Progress in Oceanography  
  Volume Numéro Pages 102343  
  Mots-Clés benthic-pelagic coupling; fish community; food webs; trophodynamics  
  Résumé (up) Investigating the drivers of fish assemblage trophic structure is a critical question, in order to better understand ecosystem functioning, predict the effects of perturbations and implement integrated management of exploited marine ecosystems. Ecosystemic surveys enabled the determination of the trophic structure of the fish assemblages in three French marine ecosystems, namely the Eastern English Channel, the Bay of Biscay and the Gulf of Lions, through the simultaneous collection of qualitative (stable isotopes and energy content) and quantitative (biomass) data. In the Bay of Biscay and in the Gulf of Lions, pelagic primary production supported at least 80% of the fish biomass production, and explained the dominance of pelagic species, but with differences resulting from the different productivity. The lower productivity in the oligotrophic Gulf of Lions led to a lower total biomass, energy density as well as the predominance of zooplankton feeders. In contrast, fluxes in the Bay of Biscay were sufficient to support a higher biomass of pelagic piscivores, and of species with higher energy content. In the shallow Eastern English Channel, the respective contributions of pelagic and benthic sources were similar. Bentho-demersal species of higher trophic level dominated this assemblage, because of their ability to exploit both pathways. Results of the present study confirmed that fisheries-focused surveys can be used as efficient platforms to address questions about ecosystem functioning. Here it confirmed the expected differences between ecosystems and the importance of primary production and environment as drivers of fish assemblage structure and functioning. Future studies should nevertheless develop new methods to better assess the paramount role of low trophic level consumers.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0079-6611 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2765  
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Auteur Duffy, L.M.; Kuhnert, P.; Pethybridge, H.R.; Young, J.W.; Olson, R.J.; Logan, J.M.; Goñi, N.; Romanov, E.; Allain, V.; Staudinger, M.; Abecassis, M.; Choy, C.A.; Hobday, A.J.; Simier, M.; Galván-Magaña, F.; Potier, M.; Ménard, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Global trophic ecology of yellowfin, bigeye, and albacore tunas: understanding predation on micronekton communities at ocean-basin scales Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography  
  Volume 140 Numéro Pages 55-73  
  Mots-Clés classification trees; climate changes; ecosystems; food webs; inter-ocean comparison; macroecology; Meta-analysis; trophic relationships  
  Résumé (up) Predator-prey interactions for three commercially valuable tuna species: yellowfin (Thunnus albacares), bigeye (T. obesus), and albacore (T. alalunga), collected over a 40-year period from the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic Oceans, were used to quantitatively assess broad, macro-scale trophic patterns in pelagic ecosystems. Analysis of over 14,000 tuna stomachs, using a modified classification tree approach, revealed for the first time the global expanse of pelagic predatory fish diet and global patterns of micronekton diversity. Ommastrephid squids were consistently one of the top prey groups by weight across all tuna species and in most ocean bodies. Interspecific differences in prey were apparent, with epipelagic scombrid and mesopelagic paralepidid fishes globally important for yellowfin and bigeye tunas, respectively, while vertically-migrating euphausiid crustaceans were important for albacore tuna in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Diet diversity showed global and regional patterns among tuna species. In the central and western Pacific Ocean, characterized by low productivity, a high diversity of micronekton prey was consumed while low prey diversity was evident in highly productive coastal waters where upwelling occurs. Spatial patterns of diet diversity were most variable in yellowfin and bigeye tunas while a latitudinal diversity gradient was observed with lower diversity in temperate regions for albacore tuna. Sea-surface temperature was a reasonable predictor of the diets of yellowfin and bigeye tunas, whereas chlorophyll-a was the best environmental predictor of albacore diet. These results suggest that the ongoing expansion of warmer, less productive waters in the world’s oceans may alter foraging opportunities for tunas due to regional changes in prey abundances and compositions.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2102  
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Auteur Albo-Puigserver, M.; Munoz, A.; Navarro, J.; Coll, M.; Pethybridge, H.; Sanchez, S.; Palomera, I. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecological energetics of forage fish from the Mediterranean Sea: Seasonal dynamics and interspecific differences Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.  
  Volume 140 Numéro Pages 74-82  
  Mots-Clés anchovy engraulis-encrasicolus; Bioenergetics; climate-change; diet composition; Energy density; environmental variability; feeding-habits; food webs; horse mackerel; Mediterranean Sea; north aegean sea; osteichthyes carangidae; sardine sardina-pilchardus; small pelagic fish  
  Résumé (up) Small and medium pelagic fishes play a central role in marine food webs by transferring energy from plankton to top predators. In this study, direct calorimetry was used to analyze the energy density of seven pelagic species collected over four seasons from the western Mediterranean Sea: anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus, sardine Sardina pilchardus, round sardinella Sardinella aurita, horse mackerels Trachurus trachurus and T. mediterraneus, and mackerels Scomber scombrus and S. colias. Inter-specific differences in energy density were linked to spawning period, energy allocation strategies for reproduction and growth, and feeding ecologies. Energy density of each species varied over time, with the exception of S. colitis, likely due to its high energetic requirements related to migration throughout the year. In general, higher energy density was observed in spring for all species, regardless of their breeding strategy, probably as a consequence of the late-winter phytoplankton bloom. These results provide new insights into the temporal availability of energy in the pelagic ecosystem of the Mediterranean Sea, which are pivotal for understanding how the population dynamics of small and medium pelagic fishes and their predators may respond to environmental changes and fishing impacts. In addition, the differences found in energy density between species highlighted the importance of using species specific energy values in ecosystem assessment tools such as bioenergetic and food web models.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2176  
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Auteur Massol, F.; Altermatt, F.; Gounand, I.; Gravel, D.; Leibold, M.A.; Mouquet, N. doi  openurl
  Titre How life-history traits affect ecosystem properties: effects of dispersal in meta-ecosystems Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Oikos  
  Volume 126 Numéro 4 Pages 532-546  
  Mots-Clés colonization trade-off; ecological stoichiometry; interaction strengths; neutral metacommunities; pond metacommunities; predator-prey interactions; source-sink metacommunities; species-diversity; terrestrial food webs; theoretical framework  
  Résumé (up) The concept of life-history traits and the study of these traits are the hallmark of population biology. Acknowledging their variability and evolution has allowed us to understand how species adapt in response to their environment. The same traits are also involved in how species alter ecosystems and shape their dynamics and functioning. Some theories, such as the metabolic theory of ecology, ecological stoichiometry or pace-of-life theory, already recognize this junction, but only do so in an implicitly non-spatial context. Meanwhile, for a decade now, it has been argued that ecosystem properties have to be understood at a larger scale using meta-ecosystem theory because source-sink dynamics, community assembly and ecosystem stability are all modified by spatial structure. Here, we argue that some ecosystem properties can be linked to a single life-history trait, dispersal, i.e. the tendency of organisms to live, compete and reproduce away from their birth place. By articulating recent theoretical and empirical studies linking ecosystem functioning and dynamics to species dispersal, we aim to highlight both the known connections between life-history traits and ecosystem properties and the unknown areas, which deserve further empirical and theoretical developments.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0030-1299 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2120  
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