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Auteur Jacquet, C.; Mouillot, D.; Kulbicki, M.; Gravel, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Extensions of Island Biogeography Theory predict the scaling of functional trait composition with habitat area and isolation Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Lett.  
  Volume (down) 20 Numéro 2 Pages 135-146  
  Mots-Clés Allometric theory; animal abundance; body-size; body-size distributions; complex food webs; coral-reef fishes; diversity; Ecology; evolution; Food web; global patterns; island biogeography; population-density; species richness; tropical reefs  
  Résumé The Theory of Island Biogeography (TIB) predicts how area and isolation influence species richness equilibrium on insular habitats. However, the TIB remains silent about functional trait composition and provides no information on the scaling of functional diversity with area, an observation that is now documented in many systems. To fill this gap, we develop a probabilistic approach to predict the distribution of a trait as a function of habitat area and isolation, extending the TIB beyond the traditional species-area relationship. We compare model predictions to the body-size distribution of piscivorous and herbivorous fishes found on tropical reefs worldwide. We find that small and isolated reefs have a higher proportion of large-sized species than large and connected reefs. We also find that knowledge of species body-size and trophic position improves the predictions of fish occupancy on tropical reefs, supporting both the allometric and trophic theory of island biogeography. The integration of functional ecology to island biogeography is broadly applicable to any functional traits and provides a general probabilistic approach to study the scaling of trait distribution with habitat area and isolation.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2087  
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Auteur Elleouet, J.; Albouy, C.; Ben Rais Lasram, F.; Mouillot, D.; Leprieur, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre A trait-based approach for assessing and mapping niche overlap between native and exotic species: the Mediterranean coastal fish fauna as a case study Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Diversity and Distributions  
  Volume (down) 20 Numéro 11 Pages 1333-1344  
  Mots-Clés Biological invasions; coastal fishes; endemic species; exotic species; functional traits; Mediterranean Sea; niche overlap  
  Résumé Aim We propose a trait-based approach for assessing and mapping potential niche overlap between native and exotic species at large spatial scales. Location The Mediterranean Sea. Methods We developed two complementary indices based on ecological, biological and ecomorphological similarities between native and exotic species. The first index (FNNr) allows identifying areas where native species are the most at risk in terms of potential ecological interactions with exotic species. The second index (FGO) is species-specific and allows identifying native species that display the broadest functional niche overlap and range overlap with exotic species. We illustrated our approach using the Mediterranean coastal fish fauna as a case study. Results We found that endemic and exotic fishes had a similar global functional niche at the Mediterranean scale, that is, they filled the same functional space defined by trait axes. FNNr hotspots were found to be moderately congruent with exotic species richness hotspots. Higher values of FNNr were observed along the coasts of the Levantine Sea. The computation of the FGO index showed that the geographical range of a given endemic species overlapped in average with 52 exotic species. Species showing the highest FGO values displayed localized and/or fragmented distributions in the eastern Mediterranean basin. Main conclusions Our findings suggest that the number of exotic species alone cannot be used as a broad-scale indicator of potential impact because this metric does not account for functional relatedness between native and exotic species. The trait-based indices developed in this study can be used for other taxa in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems and should help environmental managers to set up local-scale studies on areas where the potential impact of exotic species on native biodiversity is the highest.  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1472-4642 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1165  
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Auteur Evans, S.M.; McKenna, C.; Simpson, S.D.; Tournois, J.; Genner, M.J. doi  openurl
  Titre Patterns of species range evolution in Indo-Pacific reef assemblages reveal the Coral Triangle as a net source of transoceanic diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Lett.  
  Volume (down) 12 Numéro 6 Pages 20160090  
  Mots-Clés Bayesian skyline plot; biogeography; climate change; coral reef; fishes global patterns; marine biodiversity; ocean; phylogeography; refugia; species distributions  
  Résumé The Coral Triangle in the Indo-Pacific is a region renowned for exceptional marine biodiversity. The area could have acted as a 'centre of origin' where speciation has been prolific or a 'centre of survival' by providing refuge during major environmental shifts such as sea-level changes. The region could also have acted as a 'centre of accumulation' for species with origins outside of the Coral Triangle, owing to it being at a central position between the Indian and Pacific oceans. Here, we investigated support for these hypotheses using population-level DNA sequence-based reconstructions of the range evolution of 45 species (314 populations) of Indo-Pacific reef-associated organisms. Our results show that populations undergoing the most ancient establishment were significantly more likely to be closer to the centre of the Coral Triangle than to peripheral locations. The data are consistent with the Coral Triangle being a net source of coral-reef biodiversity for the Indo-Pacific region, suggesting that the region has acted primarily as a centre of survival, a centre of origin or both. These results provide evidence of how a key location can influence the large-scale distributions of biodiversity over evolutionary timescales.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1694  
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Auteur Juhel, J.-B.; Vigliola, L.; Wantiez, L.; Letessier, T.B.; Meeuwig, J.J.; Mouillot, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Isolation and no-entry marine reserves mitigate anthropogenic impacts on grey reef shark behavior Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep  
  Volume (down) 9 Numéro Pages 2897  
  Mots-Clés conservation; fishes; human disturbance; people; protected areas  
  Résumé Reef sharks are vulnerable predators experiencing severe population declines mainly due to overexploitation. However, beyond direct exploitation, human activities can produce indirect or sublethal effects such as behavioral alterations. Such alterations are well known for terrestrial fauna but poorly documented for marine species. Using an extensive sampling of 367 stereo baited underwater videos systems, we show modifications in grey reef shark (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) occurrence and feeding behavior along a marked gradient of isolation from humans across the New Caledonian archipelago (South-Western Pacific). The probability of occurrence decreased by 68.9% between wilderness areas (more than 25 hours travel time from the capital city) and impacted areas while the few individuals occurring in impacted areas exhibited cautious behavior. We also show that only large no-entry reserves (above 150 km(2)) can protect the behavior of grey reef sharks found in the wilderness. Influencing the fitness, human linked behavioral alterations should be taken into account for management strategies to ensure the persistence of populations.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2539  
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Auteur Andrello, M.; Guilhaumon, F.; Albouy, C.; Parravicini, V.; Scholtens, J.; Verley, P.; Barange, M.; Sumaila, U.R.; Manel, S.; Mouillot, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Global mismatch between fishing dependency and larval supply from marine reserves Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Commun.  
  Volume (down) 8 Numéro Pages 16039  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity conservation; climate-change; Connectivity; dispersal; fisheries management; impacts; Populations; protected areas; reef fishes; world  
  Résumé Marine reserves are viewed as flagship tools to protect exploited species and to contribute to the effective management of coastal fisheries. Yet, the extent to which marine reserves are globally interconnected and able to effectively seed areas, where fisheries are most critical for food and livelihood security is largely unknown. Using a hydrodynamic model of larval dispersal, we predict that most marine reserves are not interconnected by currents and that their potential benefits to fishing areas are presently limited, since countries with high dependency on coastal fisheries receive very little larval supply from marine reserves. This global mismatch could be reversed, however, by placing new marine reserves in areas sufficiently remote to minimize social and economic costs but sufficiently connected through sea currents to seed the most exploited fisheries and endangered ecosystems.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2162  
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