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Auteur Garcon, V.; Karstensen, J.; Palacz, A.; Telszewski, M.; Aparco Lara, T.; Breitburg, D.; Chavez, F.; Coelho, P.; Cornejo-D'Ottone, M.; Santos, C.; Fiedler, B.; Gallo, N.D.; Gregoire, M.; Gutierrez, D.; Hernandez-Ayon, M.; Isensee, K.; Koslow, T.; Levin, L.; Marsac, F.; Maske, H.; Mbaye, B.C.; Montes, I.; Naqvi, W.; Pearlman, J.; Pinto, E.; Pitcher, G.; Pizarro, O.; Rose, K.; Shenoy, D.; Van der Plas, A.; Vito, M.R.; Weng, K. doi  openurl
  Titre Multidisciplinary Observing in the World Ocean's Oxygen Minimum Zone Regions: From Climate to Fish – The VOICE Initiative Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Numéro Pages 722  
  Mots-Clés continental-shelf; demersal fishes; ecosystem; growth; habitat compression; humboldt current system; hypoxia; multidisciplinary; ocean observing system; oxycline; oxygen minimum zones; readiness level; reproduction; responses; variability  
  Résumé Multidisciplinary ocean observing activities provide critical ocean information to satisfy ever-changing socioeconomic needs and require coordinated implementation. The upper oxycline (transition between high and low oxygen waters) is fundamentally important for the ecosystem structure and can be a useful proxy for multiple observing objectives connected to eastern boundary systems (EBSs) that neighbor oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). The variability of the oxycline and its impact on the ecosystem (VOICE) initiative demonstrates how societal benefits drive the need for integration and optimization of biological, biogeochemical, and physical components of regional ocean observing related to EBS. In liaison with the Global Ocean Oxygen Network, VOICE creates a roadmap toward observation-model syntheses for a comprehensive understanding of selected oxycline-dependent objectives. Local to global effects, such as habitat compression or deoxygenation trends, prompt for comprehensive observing of the oxycline on various space and time scales, and for an increased awareness of its impact on ecosystem services. Building on the Framework for Ocean Observing (FOO), we present a first readiness level assessment for ocean observing of the oxycline in EBS. This was to determine current ocean observing design and future needs in EBS regions (e.g., the California Current System, the Equatorial Eastern Pacific off Ecuador, the Peru-Chile Current system, the Northern Benguela off Namibia, etc.) building on the FOO strategy. We choose regional champions to assess the ocean observing design elements proposed in the FOO, namely, requirement processes, coordination of observational elements, and data management and information products and the related best practices. The readiness level for the FOO elements was derived for each EBS through a similar and very general ad hoc questionnaire. Despite some weaknesses in the questionnaire design and its completion, an assessment was achievable. We found that fisheries and ecosystem management are a societal requirement for all regions, but maturity levels of observational elements and data management and information products differ substantially. Identification of relevant stakeholders, developing strategies for readiness level improvements, and building and sustaining infrastructure capacity to implement these strategies are fundamental milestones for the VOICE initiative over the next 2-5 years and beyond.  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2702  
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Auteur Cahill, A.E.; De Jode, A.; Dubois, S.; Bouzaza, Z.; Aurelle, D.; Boissin, E.; Chabrol, O.; David, R.; Egea, E.; Ledoux, J.-B.; Mérigot, B.; Weber, A.A.-T.; Chenuil, A. doi  openurl
  Titre A multispecies approach reveals hot spots and cold spots of diversity and connectivity in invertebrate species with contrasting dispersal modes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Mol. Ecol.  
  Volume 26 Numéro 23 Pages 6563-6577  
  Mots-Clés genetic diversity; dispersal; life-history traits; reef fishes; marine connectivity; pelagic larval duration; mediterranean sea; amphipholis-squamata; brooding brittle star; coralligenous assemblages; larvae; marine invertebrates; phylogeographical breaks; population structure; population genetic-structure; species genetic diversity correlation  
  Résumé Genetic diversity is crucial for species' maintenance and persistence, yet is often overlooked in conservation studies. Species diversity is more often reported due to practical constraints, but it is unknown if these measures of diversity are correlated. In marine invertebrates, adults are often sessile or sedentary and populations exchange genes via dispersal of gametes and larvae. Species with a larval period are expected to have more connected populations than those without larval dispersal. We assessed the relationship between measures of species and genetic diversity, and between dispersal ability and connectivity. We compiled data on genetic patterns and life history traits in nine species across five phyla. Sampling sites spanned 600km in the northwest Mediterranean Sea and focused on a 50-km area near Marseilles, France. Comparative population genetic approaches yielded three main results. (i) Species without larvae showed higher levels of genetic structure than species with free-living larvae, but the role of larval type (lecithotrophic or planktotrophic) was negligible. (ii) A narrow area around Marseilles, subject to offshore advection, limited genetic connectivity in most species. (iii) We identified sites with significant positive contributions to overall genetic diversity across all species, corresponding with areas near low human population densities. In contrast, high levels of human activity corresponded with a negative contribution to overall genetic diversity. Genetic diversity within species was positively and significantly linearly related to local species diversity. Our study suggests that local contribution to overall genetic diversity should be taken into account for future conservation strategies.  
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  ISSN 0962-1083 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2262  
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Auteur Su, G.; Villeger, S.; Brosse, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Morphological sorting of introduced freshwater fish species within and between donor realms Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés biogeographic realms; body-size; ecology; establishment; exported species; functional diversity; hydropower; imputation; invasion steps; invasion success; morphological traits; morphospace; nonnative fishes; rivers; trade; traits; translocated species  
  Résumé Aim: To determine which morphological characteristics make a fish species a good candidate for introduction and establishment, we tested whether (a) introduced species differ in morphology from non-introduced species (species only existing in native areas and not introduced to new areas) in each donor assemblage (biogeographic realm fauna); (b) within the introduced species, the morphology of established species (self-sustaining introduced species) differs from that of the non-established species; (c) within the established species, those exported out of their native realm have more extreme morphological traits than those translocated within their native realm. Major taxa studied: Freshwater fish. Location: Global. Time period: 1960s-2010s. Methods: We used a global database of freshwater fishes from the six realms. Ten morphological traits were measured on 9,150 species. Principal component analysis was conducted to combine the 10 traits into a multidimensional morphospace. We used permutational multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) and permutational analysis for the multivariate homogeneity of dispersions (PERMDISP2) to compare the distribution of species groups in the morphospace and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests to compare their distributions on principal component (PC) axes. Results: The morphology of introduced species differed from that of non-introduced species in all the six biogeographic realms. Among introduced species, established species had more extreme morphological traits than non-established species in most realms. Among established species, exported species had more extreme morphological traits than translocated species. Main conclusions: Morphological differences between introduced and nonintroduced species rely on an anthropogenic trait selection for fisheries and angling, leading to the preference for the introduction of predators with large and laterally compressed bodies. Established introduced species represent a small subset of introduced species morphologies, with these species having more extreme morphological traits, probably making them more efficient in particular habitats than their non-established counterparts. This was particularly marked for fish morphologies adapted to lentic waters. Such a trend was apparent for exported species, which have more extreme traits than translocated species.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000512276700001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2740  
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Auteur Dubois, M.; Rossi, V.; Ser-Giacomi, E.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Lopez, C.; Hernandez-Garcia, E. doi  openurl
  Titre Linking basin-scale connectivity, oceanography and population dynamics for the conservation and management of marine ecosystems Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Global Ecology and Biogeography Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 25 Numéro 5 Pages 503-515  
  Mots-Clés coral-reef fish; dispersal; genetic-structure; Larval dispersal; local retention; local retention; marine connectivity; marine ecosystems; marine protected areas; mediterranean littoral fishes; Mediterranean Sea; metapopulation; pelagic larval duration; population dynamics; Population Genetics; protected-area design; sea; self-recruitment; sink dynamics; source  
  Résumé AimAssessing the spatial structure and dynamics of marine populations is still a major challenge in ecology. The need to manage marine resources from ecosystem and large-scale perspectives is recognized, but our partial understanding of oceanic connectivity limits the implementation of globally pertinent conservation planning. Based on a biophysical model for the entire Mediterranean Sea, this study takes an ecosystem approach to connectivity and provides a systematic characterization of broad-scale larval dispersal patterns. It builds on our knowledge of population dynamics and discusses the ecological and management implications. LocationThe semi-enclosed Mediterranean Sea and its marine ecosystems are used as a case study to investigate broad-scale connectivity patterns and to relate them to oceanography and population dynamics. MethodsA flow network is constructed by evenly subdividing the basin into sub-regions which are interconnected through the transport of larvae by ocean currents. It allows for the computation of various connectivity metrics required to evaluate larval retention and exchange. ResultsOur basin-scale model predicts that retention processes are weak in the open ocean while they are significant in the coastal ocean and are favoured along certain coastlines due to specific oceanographic features. Moreover, we show that wind-driven divergent (convergent, respectively) oceanic regions are systematically characterized by larval sources (sinks, respectively). Finally, although these connectivity metrics have often been studied separately in the literature, we demonstrate they are interrelated under particular conditions. Their integrated analysis facilitates the appraisal of population dynamics, informing both genetic and demographic connectivities. Main conclusionsThis modelling framework helps ecologists and geneticists to formulate improved hypotheses of population structures and gene flow patterns and to design their sampling strategy accordingly. It is also useful in the implementation and assessment of future protection strategies, such as coastal and offshore marine reserves, by accounting for large-scale dispersal patterns, a missing component of current ecosystem management.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1655  
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Auteur Morato, T.; Gonzalez-Irusta, J.-M.; Dominguez-Carrio, C.; Wei, C.-L.; Davies, A.; Sweetman, A.K.; Taranto, G.H.; Beazley, L.; Garcia-Alegre, A.; Grehan, A.; Laffargue, P.; Murillo, F.J.; Sacau, M.; Vaz, S.; Kenchington, E.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Callery, O.; Chimienti, G.; Cordes, E.; Egilsdottir, H.; Freiwald, A.; Gasbarro, R.; Gutierrez-Zarate, C.; Gianni, M.; Gilkinson, K.; Wareham Hayes, V.E.; Hebbeln, D.; Hedges, K.; Henry, L.-A.; Johnson, D.; Koen-Alonso, M.; Lirette, C.; Mastrototaro, F.; Menot, L.; Molodtsova, T.; Duran Munoz, P.; Orejas, C.; Pennino, M.G.; Puerta, P.; Ragnarsson, S. a; Ramiro-Sanchez, B.; Rice, J.; Rivera, J.; Roberts, J.M.; Ross, S.W.; Rueda, J.L.; Sampaio, I.; Snelgrove, P.; Stirling, D.; Treble, M.A.; Urra, J.; Vad, J.; van Oevelen, D.; Watling, L.; Walkusz, W.; Wienberg, C.; Woillez, M.; Levin, L.A.; Carreiro-Silva, M. doi  openurl
  Titre Climate-induced changes in the suitable habitat of cold-water corals and commercially important deep-sea fishes in the North Atlantic Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés calcification rates; climate change; cod gadus-morhua; cold-water corals; deep-sea; envelope models; fisheries; fishes; habitat suitability modelling; lophelia-pertusa; ocean acidification; octocorals; protected areas; scleractinian corals; scleractinians; species distribution models; species distribution models; thermal tolerance; vulnerable marine ecosystems  
  Résumé The deep sea plays a critical role in global climate regulation through uptake and storage of heat and carbon dioxide. However, this regulating service causes warming, acidification and deoxygenation of deep waters, leading to decreased food availability at the seafloor. These changes and their projections are likely to affect productivity, biodiversity and distributions of deep-sea fauna, thereby compromising key ecosystem services. Understanding how climate change can lead to shifts in deep-sea species distributions is critically important in developing management measures. We used environmental niche modelling along with the best available species occurrence data and environmental parameters to model habitat suitability for key cold-water coral and commercially important deep-sea fish species under present-day (1951-2000) environmental conditions and to project changes under severe, high emissions future (2081-2100) climate projections (RCP8.5 scenario) for the North Atlantic Ocean. Our models projected a decrease of 28%-100% in suitable habitat for cold-water corals and a shift in suitable habitat for deep-sea fishes of 2.0 degrees-9.9 degrees towards higher latitudes. The largest reductions in suitable habitat were projected for the scleractinian coral Lophelia pertusa and the octocoral Paragorgia arborea, with declines of at least 79% and 99% respectively. We projected the expansion of suitable habitat by 2100 only for the fishes Helicolenus dactylopterus and Sebastes mentella (20%-30%), mostly through northern latitudinal range expansion. Our results projected limited climate refugia locations in the North Atlantic by 2100 for scleractinian corals (30%-42% of present-day suitable habitat), even smaller refugia locations for the octocorals Acanella arbuscula and Acanthogorgia armata (6%-14%), and almost no refugia for P. arborea. Our results emphasize the need to understand how anticipated climate change will affect the distribution of deep-sea species including commercially important fishes and foundation species, and highlight the importance of identifying and preserving climate refugia for a range of area-based planning and management tools.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000514391400001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2752  
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