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Auteur Su, G.; Villeger, S.; Brosse, S.
Titre (up) Morphological sorting of introduced freshwater fish species within and between donor realms Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés biogeographic realms; body-size; ecology; establishment; exported species; functional diversity; hydropower; imputation; invasion steps; invasion success; morphological traits; morphospace; nonnative fishes; rivers; trade; traits; translocated species
Résumé Aim: To determine which morphological characteristics make a fish species a good candidate for introduction and establishment, we tested whether (a) introduced species differ in morphology from non-introduced species (species only existing in native areas and not introduced to new areas) in each donor assemblage (biogeographic realm fauna); (b) within the introduced species, the morphology of established species (self-sustaining introduced species) differs from that of the non-established species; (c) within the established species, those exported out of their native realm have more extreme morphological traits than those translocated within their native realm. Major taxa studied: Freshwater fish. Location: Global. Time period: 1960s-2010s. Methods: We used a global database of freshwater fishes from the six realms. Ten morphological traits were measured on 9,150 species. Principal component analysis was conducted to combine the 10 traits into a multidimensional morphospace. We used permutational multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) and permutational analysis for the multivariate homogeneity of dispersions (PERMDISP2) to compare the distribution of species groups in the morphospace and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests to compare their distributions on principal component (PC) axes. Results: The morphology of introduced species differed from that of non-introduced species in all the six biogeographic realms. Among introduced species, established species had more extreme morphological traits than non-established species in most realms. Among established species, exported species had more extreme morphological traits than translocated species. Main conclusions: Morphological differences between introduced and nonintroduced species rely on an anthropogenic trait selection for fisheries and angling, leading to the preference for the introduction of predators with large and laterally compressed bodies. Established introduced species represent a small subset of introduced species morphologies, with these species having more extreme morphological traits, probably making them more efficient in particular habitats than their non-established counterparts. This was particularly marked for fish morphologies adapted to lentic waters. Such a trend was apparent for exported species, which have more extreme traits than translocated species.
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ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000512276700001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2740
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Auteur Garcon, V.; Karstensen, J.; Palacz, A.; Telszewski, M.; Aparco Lara, T.; Breitburg, D.; Chavez, F.; Coelho, P.; Cornejo-D'Ottone, M.; Santos, C.; Fiedler, B.; Gallo, N.D.; Gregoire, M.; Gutierrez, D.; Hernandez-Ayon, M.; Isensee, K.; Koslow, T.; Levin, L.; Marsac, F.; Maske, H.; Mbaye, B.C.; Montes, I.; Naqvi, W.; Pearlman, J.; Pinto, E.; Pitcher, G.; Pizarro, O.; Rose, K.; Shenoy, D.; Van der Plas, A.; Vito, M.R.; Weng, K.
Titre (up) Multidisciplinary Observing in the World Ocean's Oxygen Minimum Zone Regions: From Climate to Fish – The VOICE Initiative Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.
Volume 6 Numéro Pages 722
Mots-Clés continental-shelf; demersal fishes; ecosystem; growth; habitat compression; humboldt current system; hypoxia; multidisciplinary; ocean observing system; oxycline; oxygen minimum zones; readiness level; reproduction; responses; variability
Résumé Multidisciplinary ocean observing activities provide critical ocean information to satisfy ever-changing socioeconomic needs and require coordinated implementation. The upper oxycline (transition between high and low oxygen waters) is fundamentally important for the ecosystem structure and can be a useful proxy for multiple observing objectives connected to eastern boundary systems (EBSs) that neighbor oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). The variability of the oxycline and its impact on the ecosystem (VOICE) initiative demonstrates how societal benefits drive the need for integration and optimization of biological, biogeochemical, and physical components of regional ocean observing related to EBS. In liaison with the Global Ocean Oxygen Network, VOICE creates a roadmap toward observation-model syntheses for a comprehensive understanding of selected oxycline-dependent objectives. Local to global effects, such as habitat compression or deoxygenation trends, prompt for comprehensive observing of the oxycline on various space and time scales, and for an increased awareness of its impact on ecosystem services. Building on the Framework for Ocean Observing (FOO), we present a first readiness level assessment for ocean observing of the oxycline in EBS. This was to determine current ocean observing design and future needs in EBS regions (e.g., the California Current System, the Equatorial Eastern Pacific off Ecuador, the Peru-Chile Current system, the Northern Benguela off Namibia, etc.) building on the FOO strategy. We choose regional champions to assess the ocean observing design elements proposed in the FOO, namely, requirement processes, coordination of observational elements, and data management and information products and the related best practices. The readiness level for the FOO elements was derived for each EBS through a similar and very general ad hoc questionnaire. Despite some weaknesses in the questionnaire design and its completion, an assessment was achievable. We found that fisheries and ecosystem management are a societal requirement for all regions, but maturity levels of observational elements and data management and information products differ substantially. Identification of relevant stakeholders, developing strategies for readiness level improvements, and building and sustaining infrastructure capacity to implement these strategies are fundamental milestones for the VOICE initiative over the next 2-5 years and beyond.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2702
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Auteur Sadoul, B.; Geffroy, B.; Lallement, S.; Kearney, M.
Titre (up) Multiple working hypotheses for hyperallometric reproduction in fishes under metabolic theory Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Modelling
Volume 433 Numéro Pages 109228
Mots-Clés Dynamic energy budget; Fishes; Life history; Scaling; Variability
Résumé Hyperallometric reproduction, whereby large females contribute relatively more to the renewal of the population than small females, is purported to be widespread in wild populations, especially in fish species. Bioenergetic models derived from a sufficiently general metabolic theory should be able to capture such a relationship but it was recently stated that no existing models adequately capture hyperallometric reproduction. If this were true it would seriously challenge our capacity to develop robust predictions of the life history and population dynamics in changing environments for many species. Here, using the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) as a test case, we demonstrate multiple ways that hyperallometric reproduction in a population may emerge from the Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) theory, some inherently related to the metabolism and life history and others related to plastic or genetically based intraspecific variation. In addition, we demonstrate an empirical and modelled hypoallometric scaling of reproduction in this species when environment is controlled. This work shows how complex metabolic responses may underlie apparently simple relationships between weight and reproduction in the wild and provides new and testable hypotheses regarding the factors driving reproductive scaling relationships found in the wild.
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ISSN 0304-3800 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000564687300002 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2832
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Auteur Teulier, L.; Thoral, E.; Queiros, Q.; McKenzie, D.J.; Roussel, D.; Dutto, G.; Gasset, E.; Bourjea, J.; Saraux, C.
Titre (up) Muscle bioenergetics of two emblematic Mediterranean fish species: Sardina pilchardus and Sparus aurata Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Comp. Biochem. Physiol. A-Mol. Integr. Physiol.
Volume 235 Numéro Pages 174-179
Mots-Clés aerobic capacity; Bioenergetics; gait transition; Lipids; Marine fishes; metabolic fuels; pathways; physiology; Red muscle; responses; skeletal-muscle; slow; swimming performance; temperature
Résumé We investigated links between swimming behavior and muscle bioenergetics in two emblematic Mediterranean fish species that have very different ecologies and activity levels. European sardines Sardina pilchardus are pelagic, they swim aerobically, school constantly and have high muscle fat content. Gilthead seabream Sparus aurata are bentho-pelagic, they show discontinuous spontaneous swimming patterns and store less fat in their muscle. Estimating the proportion of red and white muscle phenotypes, sardine exhibited a larger proportion of red muscle (similar to 10% of the body mass) compared to gilthead seabream (similar to 5% of the body mass). We firstly studied red and white muscle fiber bioenergetics, using high-resolution respirometers, showing a 4-fold higher oxidation capacity for red compared to white muscle. Secondly, we aimed to compare the red muscle ability to oxidize either lipids or carbohydrates. Sardine red muscle had a 3-fold higher oxidative capacity than gilthead seabream and a greater capacity to oxidize lipids. This study provides novel insights into physiological mechanisms underlying the different lifestyles of these highly-prized species.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1095-6433 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000481561100018 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2629
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Auteur Handal, W.; Szostek, C.; Hold, N.; Andrello, M.; Thiebaut, E.; Harney, E.; Lefebvre, G.; Borcier, E.; Jolivet, A.; Nicolle, A.; Boye, A.; Foucher, E.; Boudry, P.; Charrier, G.
Titre (up) New insights on the population genetic structure of the great scallop (Pecten maximus) in the English Channel, coupling microsatellite data and demogenetic simulations Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquat. Conserv.-Mar. Freshw. Ecosyst.
Volume 30 Numéro 10 Pages 1841-1853
Mots-Clés connectivity; crepidula-fornicata; differentiation; English Channel; flow; gene flow; genetic modelling; genetic resources management; great scallop; larval-dispersal; low genetic structure; marine fishes; microsatellites; patterns; polychaete; seascape genetics; transplanted populations
Résumé The great scallop (Pecten maximus) is a commercially important bivalve in Europe, particularly in the English Channel, where fisheries are managed at regional and local scales through the regulation of fishing effort. In the long term, knowledge about larval dispersal and gene flow between populations is essential to ensure proper stock management. Yet, previous population genetic studies have reported contradictory results. In this study, scallop samples collected across the main fishing grounds along the French and English coasts of the English Channel (20 samples with temporal replicates for three sites,n= 1059 individuals), and the population genetic structure was analysed using 13 microsatellite loci. Coupling empirical genetic data with demogenetic modelling based on a biophysical model simulating larval exchanges among scallop beds revealed a subtle genetic differentiation between south-west English populations and the rest of the English Channel, which was consistent with larval dispersal simulations. The present study provides a step forward in the understanding of great scallop population biology in the English Channel, underlining the fact that even in a context of potentially high gene flow and recent divergence times since the end of the last glacial maximum, weak but significant spatial genetic structure can be identified at a regional scale.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1052-7613 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000566426700001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2866
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