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Auteur Sardenne, F.; Hollanda, S.; Lawrence, S.; Albert-Arrisol, R.; Degroote, M.; Bodin, N. doi  openurl
  Titre Trophic structures in tropical marine ecosystems: a comparative investigation using three different ecological tracers Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Indic.  
  Volume 81 Numéro Pages 315-324  
  Mots-Clés feeding-behavior; Stable isotopes; food webs; Fatty acids; Mercury; western indian-ocean; gulf-of-mexico; amino-acid; stable-isotope; bioaccumulation; fatty-acid compositions; Indian ocean; mercury exposure; pelagic fishes; Tropical food web  
  Résumé We looked at how three ecological tracers may influence the characterization and interpretation of trophic structures in a tropical marine system, with a view to informing tracer(s) selection in future trophic ecology studies. We compared the trophic structures described by stable isotope compositions (carbon and nitrogen), the total mercury concentration (THg) and levels of essential fatty acids (EFA) at both the individual and species level. Analyses were undertaken on muscle tissue samples from fish and crustacean species caught in the waters surrounding the Seychelles. The carbon isotope composition (delta C-13) correlated to the proportion of arachidonic acid (ARA), whereas the nitrogen isotope composition (delta N-15) correlated to the proportion of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and THg. At the individual level, trophic position obtained with these three last tracers are similar. In ' contrast, the eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) was not clearly correlated to any of the tracers. At the species level, the use of EFA (ARA and DHA), as compared to stable isotopes, resulted in slight structural modifications, mainly in the middle trophic levels. For example, the EFA overestimated the trophic positions of Thunnus alalunga and Etelis coruscans but underestimated the trophic positions of other snappers and groupers. While ARA mainly originates from coastal/benthic areas, DHA is conserved throughout the food web and may be used as a proxy indicator of trophic position. However, metabolic disparities can affect ecological tracers and in turn, distort the trophic structures derived from their results. This is especially true for species with close trophic ecologies. Despite these caveats, we think that analysing at the individual level the wealth of ARA, DHA and THg data that has already been obtained through earlier nutrition or food security studies would enhance our understanding of trophic structures.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1470-160x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection (down) 2246  
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Auteur Villeger, S.; Brosse, S.; Mouchet, M.; Mouillot, D.; Vanni, M.J. doi  openurl
  Titre Functional ecology of fish: current approaches and future challenges Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquat. Sci.  
  Volume 79 Numéro 4 Pages 783-801  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; centrarchid fishes; coral-reef fishes; dietary-morphological relationships; ecosystem processes; Ecosystem services; fish; food-web; fresh-water fish; functional trait; global change; labrid fishes; life-history strategies; ocean; phosphorus-limitation; population regulation; river  
  Résumé Fish communities face increasing anthropogenic pressures in freshwater and marine ecosystems that modify their biodiversity and threaten the services they supply to human populations. To address these issues, studies have been increasingly focusing on functions of fish that are linked to their main ecological roles in aquatic ecosystems. Fish are indeed known to control other organisms through predation, mediate nutrient fluxes, and can act as ecosystem engineers. Here for each of the key functions played by fish, we present the functional traits that have already been used to assess them. We include traits measurable from observations on living individuals, morphological features measured on preserved organisms or traits categorized using information from the literature, and we discuss their respective advantages and limitations. We then list future research directions to foster a more complete functional approach for fish ecology that needs to incorporate functional traits describing, food provisioning and cultural services while accounting more frequently for intraspecific variability. Finally, we highlight ecological and evolutionary questions that could be addressed using meta-analyses of large trait databases, and how a trait-based framework could provide valuable insights on the mechanistic links between global changes, functional diversity of fish assemblages, and ecosystem services.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1015-1621 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection (down) 2211  
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Auteur Lucena-Fredou, F.; Kell, L.; Fredou, T.; Gaertner, D.; Potier, M.; Bach, P.; Travassos, P.; Hazin, F.; Menard, F. doi  openurl
  Titre Vulnerability of teleosts caught by the pelagic tuna longline fleets in South Atlantic and Western Indian Oceans Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.  
  Volume 140 Numéro Pages 230-241  
  Mots-Clés Bycatch; climate-change; ecological risk-assessment; exploitation status; Fishery management; impact; life-history strategies; management; marine fishes; Productivity and Susceptibility Analysis; risk; Sustainability; trawl fishery  
  Résumé Productivity and Susceptibility Analysis (PSA) is a methodology for evaluating the vulnerability of a stock based on its biological productivity and susceptibility to fishing. In this study, we evaluated the vulnerability of 60 stocks of tuna, billfishes and other teleosts caught by the tuna longline fleets operating in the South Atlantic and Indian Ocean using a semi-quantitative PSA. We (a) evaluated the vulnerability of the species in the study areas; (b) compared the vulnerability of target and non-target species and oceans; (c) analyzed the sensitivity of data entry; and (d) compared the results of the PSA to other fully quantitative assessment methods. Istiophoridae exhibited the highest scores for vulnerability. The top 10 species at risk were: Atlantic Istiophorus albicans; Indian Ocean Istiompax indica; Atlantic Makaira nigricans and Thunnus alalunga; Indian Ocean Xiphias gladius; Atlantic T. albacares, Gempylus serpens, Ranzania laevis and X. gladius; and Indian Ocean T. alalunga. All species considered at high risk were targeted or were commercialized bycatch, except for the Atlantic G. serpens and R. laevis which.were discarded, and may be considered as a false positive. Those species and others at high risk should be prioritized for further assessment and/or data collection. Most species at moderate risk were bycatch species kept for sale. Conversely, species classified at low risk were mostly discarded. Overall, species at high risk were overfished and/or subjected to overfishing. Moreover, all species considered to be within extinction risk (Critically Endangered, Endangered and Vulnerable) were in the high risk category. The good concordance between approaches corroborates the results of our analysis. PSA is not a replacement for traditional stock assessments, where a stock is assessed at regular intervals to provide management advice. It is of importance, however, where there is uncertainty about catches and life history parameters, since it can identify species at risk, and where management action and data collection is required, e.g. for many species at high and most at moderate risk in the South Atlantic and Indian oceans.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection (down) 2179  
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Auteur Massol, F.; Dubart, M.; Calcagno, V.; Cazelles, K.; Jacquet, C.; Kefi, S.; Gravel, D. isbn  openurl
  Titre Island Biogeography of Food Webs Type Chapitre de livre
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée  
  Volume Numéro Pages 183-262  
  Mots-Clés animal abundance; body-size; complex networks; coral-reef fishes; coupled chemical-reactions; ecological communities; experimental zoogeography; habitat loss; power-laws; species-area relationship  
  Résumé To understand why and how species invade ecosystems, ecologists have made heavy use of observations of species colonization on islands. The theory of island biogeography, developed in the 1960s by R.H. MacArthur and E.O. Wilson, has had a tremendous impact on how ecologists understand the link between species diversity and characteristics of the habitat such as isolation and size. Recent developments have described how the inclusion of information on trophic interactions can further inform our understanding of island biogeography dynamics. Here, we extend the trophic theory of island biogeography to assess whether certain food web properties on the mainland affect colonization/extinction dynamics of species on islands. Our results highlight that both food web connectance and size on the mainland increase species diversity on islands. We also highlight that more heavily tailed degree distributions in the mainland food web correlate with less frequent but potentially more important extinction cascades on islands. The average shortest path to a basal species on islands follows a hump-shaped curve as a function of realized species richness, with food chains slightly longer than on the mainland at intermediate species richness. More modular mainland webs are also less persistent on islands. We discuss our results in the context of global changes and from the viewpoint of community assembly rules, aiming at pinpointing further theoretical developments needed to make the trophic theory of island biogeography even more useful for fundamental and applied ecology.  
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  Editeur Elsevier Academic Press Inc Lieu de Publication San Diego Éditeur Bohan, D.A.; Dumbrell, A.J.; Massol, F.  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé Networks of Invasion: A Synthesis of Concepts  
  Volume de collection 56 Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-0-12-804331-8 978-0-12-804338-7 Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection (down) 2174  
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Auteur Andrello, M.; Guilhaumon, F.; Albouy, C.; Parravicini, V.; Scholtens, J.; Verley, P.; Barange, M.; Sumaila, U.R.; Manel, S.; Mouillot, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Global mismatch between fishing dependency and larval supply from marine reserves Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Commun.  
  Volume 8 Numéro Pages 16039  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity conservation; climate-change; Connectivity; dispersal; fisheries management; impacts; Populations; protected areas; reef fishes; world  
  Résumé Marine reserves are viewed as flagship tools to protect exploited species and to contribute to the effective management of coastal fisheries. Yet, the extent to which marine reserves are globally interconnected and able to effectively seed areas, where fisheries are most critical for food and livelihood security is largely unknown. Using a hydrodynamic model of larval dispersal, we predict that most marine reserves are not interconnected by currents and that their potential benefits to fishing areas are presently limited, since countries with high dependency on coastal fisheries receive very little larval supply from marine reserves. This global mismatch could be reversed, however, by placing new marine reserves in areas sufficiently remote to minimize social and economic costs but sufficiently connected through sea currents to seed the most exploited fisheries and endangered ecosystems.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection (down) 2162  
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