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Auteur Jacquet, C.; Mouillot, D.; Kulbicki, M.; Gravel, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Extensions of Island Biogeography Theory predict the scaling of functional trait composition with habitat area and isolation Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Lett.  
  Volume 20 Numéro 2 Pages 135-146  
  Mots-Clés Allometric theory; animal abundance; body-size; body-size distributions; complex food webs; coral-reef fishes; diversity; Ecology; evolution; Food web; global patterns; island biogeography; population-density; species richness; tropical reefs  
  Résumé The Theory of Island Biogeography (TIB) predicts how area and isolation influence species richness equilibrium on insular habitats. However, the TIB remains silent about functional trait composition and provides no information on the scaling of functional diversity with area, an observation that is now documented in many systems. To fill this gap, we develop a probabilistic approach to predict the distribution of a trait as a function of habitat area and isolation, extending the TIB beyond the traditional species-area relationship. We compare model predictions to the body-size distribution of piscivorous and herbivorous fishes found on tropical reefs worldwide. We find that small and isolated reefs have a higher proportion of large-sized species than large and connected reefs. We also find that knowledge of species body-size and trophic position improves the predictions of fish occupancy on tropical reefs, supporting both the allometric and trophic theory of island biogeography. The integration of functional ecology to island biogeography is broadly applicable to any functional traits and provides a general probabilistic approach to study the scaling of trait distribution with habitat area and isolation.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2087  
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Auteur Goetze, J.S.; Claudet, J.; Januchowski-Hartley, F.; Langlois, T.J.; Wilson, S.K.; White, C.; Weeks, R.; Jupiter, S.D. doi  openurl
  Titre Demonstrating multiple benefits from periodically harvested fisheries closures Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Appl. Ecol.  
  Volume 55 Numéro 3 Pages 1102-1113  
  Mots-Clés analytical framework; conservation; coral-reef fishes; customary management; fisheries management; food security; locally managed marine areas; long-term; management; marine protected areas; marine reserve; matter; meta-analysis; metaanalysis; partially protected areas; periodically harvested closures; populations; reserves; small-scale fisheries; video  
  Résumé 1. Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) are one of the most common forms of fisheries management in Melanesia, demonstrating multiple objectives, including sustaining fish stocks and increasing catch efficiency to support small-scale fisheries. No studies have comprehensively assessed their ability to provide short-term fisheries benefits across the entire harvest regime. 2. We present a novel analytical framework to guide a meta-analysis and assist future research in conceptualizing and assessing the potential of PHCs to deliver benefits for multiple fisheries-related objectives. 3. Ten PHCs met our selection criteria and on average, they provided a 48% greater abundance and 92% greater biomass of targeted fishes compared with areas open to fishing prior to being harvested. 4. This translated into tangible harvest benefits, with fishers removing 21% of the abundance and 49% of the biomass within PHCs, resulting in few post-harvest protection benefits. 5. When PHCs are larger, closed for longer periods or well enforced, short-term fisheries benefits are improved. However, an increased availability of fish within PHCs leads to greater removal during harvests. 6. Synthesis and applications. Periodically harvested closures (PHCs) can provide short-term fisheries benefits. Use of the analytical framework presented here will assist in determining long-term fisheries and conservation benefits. We recommend PHCs be closed to fishing for as long as possible, be as large as possible, that compliance be encouraged via community engagement and enforcement, and strict deadlines/goals for harvesting set to prevent overfishing.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8901 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2345  
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Auteur Bonnet, D.; Molinero, J.C.; Schohn, T.; Yahia, M.N.D. url  openurl
  Titre Seasonal changes in the population dynamics of Aurelia aurita in Thau lagoon Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Cah. Biol. Mar.  
  Volume 53 Numéro 3 Pages 343-347  
  Mots-Clés Aurelia aurita; Mediterranean Sea; abundance; fishes; jellyfish; lagoon; scyphomedusae; sea  
  Résumé Seasonal dynamics of the scyphomedusae, Aurelia aurita, was investigated twice a month from January 2010 to June 2011 and related to environmental conditions in Thau lagoon, southwestern Mediterranean Sea. Strobilation, indicated by the presence of 1 mm ephyrae, occurred from November to the middle of April. Maximum abundances up to 330 ind.100 m(-3) were reached in May 2011, few weeks after the last ephyrae release. The population declines afterwards steadily until disappearing from the water column. Concurrent with increased water temperature and mesozooplankton predation during May, growth rates increased from 0.04 mm.day(-1) to a peak of 4.5 mm.day(-1), with a maximum bell diameter of 11.3 cm reached on the 7th May. During the study period, there was no advection of A. aurita between Thau lagoon and the coastal waters.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0007-9723 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 820  
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Auteur Durand, J.-D.; Hubert, N.; Shen, K.-N.; Borsa, P. doi  openurl
  Titre DNA barcoding grey mullets Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Rev. Fish. Biol. Fish.  
  Volume 27 Numéro 1 Pages 233-243  
  Mots-Clés coi; fish assemblages; genetics; identification; level; management; marine fishes; maximum-parsimony methods; mitochondrial phylogeny; Mugilidae; new-caledonia; south-america; species diversity; Taxonomy; teleostei mugilidae  
  Résumé Despite the ecological and commercial importance of grey mullets (fish family Mugilidae), their taxonomy and systematics are still much debated. Reasons for this are the low level of morphometric variability and the relatively poor phylogenetic information borne by the morpho-anatomical characters used thus far in diagnosing species. Here, we evaluate the potential of DNA barcoding to accurately delineate species and assign unknown specimens to taxa in the family Mugilidae. Our reference sample consists of 257 individuals from 91 lineages characterized by their nucleotide sequences at the COI, cytochrome b, and 16S rRNA loci. These lineages correspond to 55 species according to the current taxonomy, and 36 presumed cryptic species. All known and presumed cryptic species within the 'Mugil cephalus' (n = 15) and 'M. curema' (n = 6) species complexes, as well as within genera Chelon (n = 10), Crenimugil (n = 6), Osteomugil (n = 6), and Planiliza (n = 18) were successfully recovered as distinct lineages by COI gene sequences (598 bp), demonstrating the utility of this marker to delineate species in the family Mugilidae. Inconsistencies in the labeling of sequences deposited in GenBank were ascribed to species misidentification. A proportion of these misidentifications occurred in the course of dedicated barcoding surveys, further emphasizing the need for an accurate and exhaustive reference barcoding database for Mugilidae.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0960-3166 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2109  
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Auteur Trystram, C.; Rogers, K.M.; Soria, M.; Jaquemet, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Feeding patterns of two sympatric shark predators in coastal ecosystems of an oceanic island Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci.  
  Volume 74 Numéro 2 Pages 216-227  
  Mots-Clés Bull shark; carcharhinus-leucas; elasmobranch fishes; galeocerdo-cuvier; individual specialization; Reunion island; south-africa; stable-isotope analyses; tiger shark; western indian-ocean  
  Résumé Stomach contents and stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses (delta C-13 and delta N-15) were used to investigate the trophic ecology of two apex predators, tiger sharks (Galeocerdo cuvier) and bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas), from Reunion Island to describe their dietary habits at both the population and individual levels. In this oceanic island, the tiger and bull sharks were more piscivorous and teutophagous than noted in previous research from other localities. The delta C-13 values suggested that bull sharks depended on more neritic organic matter sources than tiger sharks, confirming a coastal habitat preference for bull sharks. Moreover, the total length of the bull shark influenced delta C-13 values, with smaller individuals being more coastal than larger individuals. All indicators suggest that there is a higher degree of similarity between individual tiger sharks compared with the more heterogeneous bull shark population, which is composed of individuals who specialize on different prey. These results suggest that the two species have different functions in these coastal habitats, and thus, they must be considered independently in terms of conservation and management.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0706-652x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2111  
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