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Auteur Su, G.; Villeger, S.; Brosse, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Morphological sorting of introduced freshwater fish species within and between donor realms Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.  
  Volume Numéro (up) Pages  
  Mots-Clés biogeographic realms; body-size; ecology; establishment; exported species; functional diversity; hydropower; imputation; invasion steps; invasion success; morphological traits; morphospace; nonnative fishes; rivers; trade; traits; translocated species  
  Résumé Aim: To determine which morphological characteristics make a fish species a good candidate for introduction and establishment, we tested whether (a) introduced species differ in morphology from non-introduced species (species only existing in native areas and not introduced to new areas) in each donor assemblage (biogeographic realm fauna); (b) within the introduced species, the morphology of established species (self-sustaining introduced species) differs from that of the non-established species; (c) within the established species, those exported out of their native realm have more extreme morphological traits than those translocated within their native realm. Major taxa studied: Freshwater fish. Location: Global. Time period: 1960s-2010s. Methods: We used a global database of freshwater fishes from the six realms. Ten morphological traits were measured on 9,150 species. Principal component analysis was conducted to combine the 10 traits into a multidimensional morphospace. We used permutational multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA) and permutational analysis for the multivariate homogeneity of dispersions (PERMDISP2) to compare the distribution of species groups in the morphospace and Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests to compare their distributions on principal component (PC) axes. Results: The morphology of introduced species differed from that of non-introduced species in all the six biogeographic realms. Among introduced species, established species had more extreme morphological traits than non-established species in most realms. Among established species, exported species had more extreme morphological traits than translocated species. Main conclusions: Morphological differences between introduced and nonintroduced species rely on an anthropogenic trait selection for fisheries and angling, leading to the preference for the introduction of predators with large and laterally compressed bodies. Established introduced species represent a small subset of introduced species morphologies, with these species having more extreme morphological traits, probably making them more efficient in particular habitats than their non-established counterparts. This was particularly marked for fish morphologies adapted to lentic waters. Such a trend was apparent for exported species, which have more extreme traits than translocated species.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000512276700001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2740  
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Auteur Morato, T.; Gonzalez-Irusta, J.-M.; Dominguez-Carrio, C.; Wei, C.-L.; Davies, A.; Sweetman, A.K.; Taranto, G.H.; Beazley, L.; Garcia-Alegre, A.; Grehan, A.; Laffargue, P.; Murillo, F.J.; Sacau, M.; Vaz, S.; Kenchington, E.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Callery, O.; Chimienti, G.; Cordes, E.; Egilsdottir, H.; Freiwald, A.; Gasbarro, R.; Gutierrez-Zarate, C.; Gianni, M.; Gilkinson, K.; Wareham Hayes, V.E.; Hebbeln, D.; Hedges, K.; Henry, L.-A.; Johnson, D.; Koen-Alonso, M.; Lirette, C.; Mastrototaro, F.; Menot, L.; Molodtsova, T.; Duran Munoz, P.; Orejas, C.; Pennino, M.G.; Puerta, P.; Ragnarsson, S. a; Ramiro-Sanchez, B.; Rice, J.; Rivera, J.; Roberts, J.M.; Ross, S.W.; Rueda, J.L.; Sampaio, I.; Snelgrove, P.; Stirling, D.; Treble, M.A.; Urra, J.; Vad, J.; van Oevelen, D.; Watling, L.; Walkusz, W.; Wienberg, C.; Woillez, M.; Levin, L.A.; Carreiro-Silva, M. doi  openurl
  Titre Climate-induced changes in the suitable habitat of cold-water corals and commercially important deep-sea fishes in the North Atlantic Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.  
  Volume Numéro (up) Pages  
  Mots-Clés calcification rates; climate change; cod gadus-morhua; cold-water corals; deep-sea; envelope models; fisheries; fishes; habitat suitability modelling; lophelia-pertusa; ocean acidification; octocorals; protected areas; scleractinian corals; scleractinians; species distribution models; species distribution models; thermal tolerance; vulnerable marine ecosystems  
  Résumé The deep sea plays a critical role in global climate regulation through uptake and storage of heat and carbon dioxide. However, this regulating service causes warming, acidification and deoxygenation of deep waters, leading to decreased food availability at the seafloor. These changes and their projections are likely to affect productivity, biodiversity and distributions of deep-sea fauna, thereby compromising key ecosystem services. Understanding how climate change can lead to shifts in deep-sea species distributions is critically important in developing management measures. We used environmental niche modelling along with the best available species occurrence data and environmental parameters to model habitat suitability for key cold-water coral and commercially important deep-sea fish species under present-day (1951-2000) environmental conditions and to project changes under severe, high emissions future (2081-2100) climate projections (RCP8.5 scenario) for the North Atlantic Ocean. Our models projected a decrease of 28%-100% in suitable habitat for cold-water corals and a shift in suitable habitat for deep-sea fishes of 2.0 degrees-9.9 degrees towards higher latitudes. The largest reductions in suitable habitat were projected for the scleractinian coral Lophelia pertusa and the octocoral Paragorgia arborea, with declines of at least 79% and 99% respectively. We projected the expansion of suitable habitat by 2100 only for the fishes Helicolenus dactylopterus and Sebastes mentella (20%-30%), mostly through northern latitudinal range expansion. Our results projected limited climate refugia locations in the North Atlantic by 2100 for scleractinian corals (30%-42% of present-day suitable habitat), even smaller refugia locations for the octocorals Acanella arbuscula and Acanthogorgia armata (6%-14%), and almost no refugia for P. arborea. Our results emphasize the need to understand how anticipated climate change will affect the distribution of deep-sea species including commercially important fishes and foundation species, and highlight the importance of identifying and preserving climate refugia for a range of area-based planning and management tools.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000514391400001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2752  
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Auteur Juhel, J.-B.; Vigliola, L.; Wantiez, L.; Letessier, T.B.; Meeuwig, J.J.; Mouillot, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Isolation and no-entry marine reserves mitigate anthropogenic impacts on grey reef shark behavior Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep  
  Volume 9 Numéro (up) Pages 2897  
  Mots-Clés conservation; fishes; human disturbance; people; protected areas  
  Résumé Reef sharks are vulnerable predators experiencing severe population declines mainly due to overexploitation. However, beyond direct exploitation, human activities can produce indirect or sublethal effects such as behavioral alterations. Such alterations are well known for terrestrial fauna but poorly documented for marine species. Using an extensive sampling of 367 stereo baited underwater videos systems, we show modifications in grey reef shark (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) occurrence and feeding behavior along a marked gradient of isolation from humans across the New Caledonian archipelago (South-Western Pacific). The probability of occurrence decreased by 68.9% between wilderness areas (more than 25 hours travel time from the capital city) and impacted areas while the few individuals occurring in impacted areas exhibited cautious behavior. We also show that only large no-entry reserves (above 150 km(2)) can protect the behavior of grey reef sharks found in the wilderness. Influencing the fitness, human linked behavioral alterations should be taken into account for management strategies to ensure the persistence of populations.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2539  
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Auteur Durand, J.-D.; Hubert, N.; Shen, K.-N.; Borsa, P. doi  openurl
  Titre DNA barcoding grey mullets Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Rev. Fish. Biol. Fish.  
  Volume 27 Numéro (up) 1 Pages 233-243  
  Mots-Clés coi; fish assemblages; genetics; identification; level; management; marine fishes; maximum-parsimony methods; mitochondrial phylogeny; Mugilidae; new-caledonia; south-america; species diversity; Taxonomy; teleostei mugilidae  
  Résumé Despite the ecological and commercial importance of grey mullets (fish family Mugilidae), their taxonomy and systematics are still much debated. Reasons for this are the low level of morphometric variability and the relatively poor phylogenetic information borne by the morpho-anatomical characters used thus far in diagnosing species. Here, we evaluate the potential of DNA barcoding to accurately delineate species and assign unknown specimens to taxa in the family Mugilidae. Our reference sample consists of 257 individuals from 91 lineages characterized by their nucleotide sequences at the COI, cytochrome b, and 16S rRNA loci. These lineages correspond to 55 species according to the current taxonomy, and 36 presumed cryptic species. All known and presumed cryptic species within the 'Mugil cephalus' (n = 15) and 'M. curema' (n = 6) species complexes, as well as within genera Chelon (n = 10), Crenimugil (n = 6), Osteomugil (n = 6), and Planiliza (n = 18) were successfully recovered as distinct lineages by COI gene sequences (598 bp), demonstrating the utility of this marker to delineate species in the family Mugilidae. Inconsistencies in the labeling of sequences deposited in GenBank were ascribed to species misidentification. A proportion of these misidentifications occurred in the course of dedicated barcoding surveys, further emphasizing the need for an accurate and exhaustive reference barcoding database for Mugilidae.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0960-3166 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2109  
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Auteur Brosse, S.; Beauchard, O.; Blanchet, S.; Dürr, H.H.; Grenouillet, G.; Hugueny, B.; Lauzeral, C.; Leprieur, F.; Tedesco, P.A.; Villeger, S.; Oberdorff, T. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Fish-SPRICH: a database of freshwater fish species richness throughout the World Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Hydrobiologia  
  Volume 700 Numéro (up) 1 Pages 343-349  
  Mots-Clés Endemic; Global extent; Native; Non-native; River drainage basin; fishes  
  Résumé There is growing interest in large-scale approaches to ecology, for both plants and animals. In particular, macroecological studies enable examination of the patterns and determinants of species richness of a variety of groups of organism throughout the world, which might have important implications for prediction and mitigation of the consequences of global change. Here, we provide richness data for freshwater fishes, which, with more than 13,000 described species, comprise a quarter of all vertebrate species. We conducted an extensive literature survey of native, non-native (exotic), and endemic freshwater fish species richness. The resulting database, called Fish-SPRICH, contains data from more than 400 bibliographic sources including published papers, books, and grey literature sources. Fish-SPRICH contains richness values at the river basin grain for 1,054 river basins covering more than 80% of the earth's continental surface. This database is currently the most comprehensive global database of native, non-native and endemic freshwater fish richness available at the river basin grain.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0018-8158 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 604  
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