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Auteur Olson, R.J.; Young, J.W.; Menard, F.; Potier, M.; Allain, V.; Goni, N.; Logan, J.M.; Galvan-Magana, F.
Titre Bioenergetics, Trophic Ecology, and Niche Separation of Tunas Type Chapitre de livre
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée
Volume Numéro Pages (down) 199-344
Mots-Clés albacore thunnus-alalunga; atlantic bluefin tuna; eastern tropical pacific; fish aggregation devices; gulf-of-mexico; large pelagic fishes; oceanic top predators; predator-prey interactions; satellite archival tags; western indian-ocean
Résumé Tunas are highly specialized predators that have evolved numerous adaptations for a lifestyle that requires large amounts of energy consumption. Here we review our understanding of the bioenergetics and feeding dynamics of tunas on a global scale, with an emphasis on yellowfin, bigeye, skipjack, albacore, and Atlantic bluefin tunas. Food consumption balances bioenergetics expenditures for respiration, growth (including gonad production), specific dynamic action, egestion, and excretion. Tunas feed across the micronekton and some large zooplankton. Some tunas appear to time their life history to take advantage of ephemeral aggregations of crustacean, fish, and molluscan prey. Ontogenetic and spatial diet differences are substantial, and significant interdecadal changes in prey composition have been observed. Diet shifts from larger to smaller prey taxa highlight ecosystem-wide changes in prey availability and diversity and provide implications for changing bioenergetics requirements into the future. Where tunas overlap, we show evidence of niche separation between them; resources are divided largely by differences in diet percentages and size ranges of prey taxa. The lack of long-term data limits the ability to predict impacts of climate change on tuna feeding behaviour. We note the need for systematic collection of feeding data as part of routine monitoring of these species, and we highlight the advantages of using biochemical techniques for broad-scale analyses of trophic relations. We support the continued development of ecosystem models, which all too often lack the regional-specific trophic data needed to adequately investigate climate and fishing impacts.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Elsevier Academic Press Inc Lieu de Publication San Diego Éditeur Curry, B.E.
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé Advances in Marine Biology, Vol 74
Volume de collection 74 Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-0-12-803607-5 Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1661
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Auteur Massol, F.; Dubart, M.; Calcagno, V.; Cazelles, K.; Jacquet, C.; Kefi, S.; Gravel, D.
Titre Island Biogeography of Food Webs Type Chapitre de livre
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée
Volume Numéro Pages (down) 183-262
Mots-Clés animal abundance; body-size; complex networks; coral-reef fishes; coupled chemical-reactions; ecological communities; experimental zoogeography; habitat loss; power-laws; species-area relationship
Résumé To understand why and how species invade ecosystems, ecologists have made heavy use of observations of species colonization on islands. The theory of island biogeography, developed in the 1960s by R.H. MacArthur and E.O. Wilson, has had a tremendous impact on how ecologists understand the link between species diversity and characteristics of the habitat such as isolation and size. Recent developments have described how the inclusion of information on trophic interactions can further inform our understanding of island biogeography dynamics. Here, we extend the trophic theory of island biogeography to assess whether certain food web properties on the mainland affect colonization/extinction dynamics of species on islands. Our results highlight that both food web connectance and size on the mainland increase species diversity on islands. We also highlight that more heavily tailed degree distributions in the mainland food web correlate with less frequent but potentially more important extinction cascades on islands. The average shortest path to a basal species on islands follows a hump-shaped curve as a function of realized species richness, with food chains slightly longer than on the mainland at intermediate species richness. More modular mainland webs are also less persistent on islands. We discuss our results in the context of global changes and from the viewpoint of community assembly rules, aiming at pinpointing further theoretical developments needed to make the trophic theory of island biogeography even more useful for fundamental and applied ecology.
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Editeur Elsevier Academic Press Inc Lieu de Publication San Diego Éditeur Bohan, D.A.; Dumbrell, A.J.; Massol, F.
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé Networks of Invasion: A Synthesis of Concepts
Volume de collection 56 Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-0-12-804331-8 978-0-12-804338-7 Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2174
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Auteur Mérigot, B.; Frédou, F.L.; Viana, A.P.; Ferreira, B.P.; do Nascimento Costa Junior, E.; Beserra da Silva Júnior, C.A.; Frédou, T.
Titre Fish assemblages in tropical estuaries of northeast Brazil: A multi-component diversity approach Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Ocean & Coastal Management
Volume 143 Numéro Pages (down) 175-183
Mots-Clés Diversity indices; Double principal coordinate analysis; ecosystem-based fisheries management; Estuaries; Fishes; monitoring; taxonomic diversity
Résumé Biodiversity in estuarine ecosystems suffers from the impact of environmental changes and human activities. This mainly involves changes in temperature, salinity, pollution, habitat degradation or loss and fishing activities. The diversity of species communities is traditionally assessed on the basis of their species richness and composition. However, there is growing interest in taking into account complementary components dealing with species differences (e.g. taxonomic relatedness). In spite of their social, ecological and economic importance, the diversity of tropical estuarine fish assemblages has rarely been monitored by means of a multi-component approach under different human pressure and environmental conditions. We analysed the diversity of exploited fish communities (both target and non-target species) sampled during scientific surveys within four estuarine complexes in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil: Itapissuma, Suape, Sirinhaém, and Rio Formoso. A total of 122 species were collected within 34 samples. Overall, diversity indices and species models fitting dominance-evenness profiles mainly revealed differences between assemblages from Itapissuma, being the largest estuary with wide areas of mangrove, and the other estuaries. While assemblages from Itapissuma generally encompassed more species and individuals than the other estuaries, species were more closely related from a taxonomic point of view. In addition, a Double Principal Coordinate Analysis (DPCoA) established a typology of assemblages, useful for management purposes, and linked to particular fish families: it highlighted differences between Itapissuma, Suape, Sirinhaém and Rio Formoso. This method combines matrices of species abundances and differences (here taxonomic distances according to the Linnean classification). It was particularly accurate with a first factorial plane explaining 73% of the total inertia, while only 17% was achieved by a traditional Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Overall, this study provides an assessment of the state of fish assemblage diversity in Pernambuco estuaries where contrasted human and environmental conditions occur. It underscores the accuracy of using a multi-component diversity approach, with a multivariate analysis that is not yet widely used, for monitoring the diversity of estuaries for ecosystem-based fisheries management purposes.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection The challenge of developing policies and management strategies under changing baselines and unbounded boundaries Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection 143 Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0964-5691 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2137
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Auteur Guilhaumon, F.; Albouy, C.; Claudet, J.; Velez, L.; Ben Rais Lasram, F.; Tomasini, J.-A.; Douzery, E.J.P.; Meynard, C.N.; Mouquet, N.; Troussellier, M.; Araújo, M.B.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Representing taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversity: new challenges for Mediterranean marine-protected areas Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Diversity Distrib.
Volume 21 Numéro 2 Pages (down) 175-187
Mots-Clés Functional diversity; Gap analysis; marine-protected area; Mediterranean fishes; phylogenetic diversity; reserves; taxonomic diversity
Résumé Aim To assess gaps in the representation of taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversity among coastal fishes in Mediterranean marine-protected areas (MPAs). Location Mediterranean Sea. Methods We first assessed gaps in the taxonomic representation of the 340 coastal fish species in Mediterranean MPAs, with representation targets (the species range proportion to be covered by MPAs) set to be inversely proportional to species' range sizes. We then asked whether MPAs favoured representation of phylogenetically and functionally more distinct species or whether there was a tendency to favour less distinctive ones. We finally evaluated the overall conservation effectiveness of the MPAs using a metric that integrates species' phylogenetic and functional relationships and targets achievement. The effectiveness of the MPA system at protecting biodiversity was assessed by comparison of its achievements against a null model obtained by siting current MPAs at random over the study area. Results Among the coastal fish species analysed, 16 species were not covered by any MPA. All the remaining species only partially achieved the pre-defined representation target. The current MPA system missed fewer species than expected from siting MPAs at random. However, c. 70% of the species did not achieve better protection in the current MPAs than expected from siting MPAs at random. Functional and evolutionary distinctiveness were weakly correlated with target achievement. The observed coverage of taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversity was not different or lower than expected from siting MPAs at random. Main conclusions The Mediterranean MPA system falls short in meeting conservation targets for coastal fish taxonomic diversity, phylogenetic diversity and functional diversity. Mediterranean MPAs do not encompass more biodiversity than expected by chance. This study reveals multiple ongoing challenges and calls for regional collaboration for the extension of the Mediterranean system of MPAs to meet international commitments and reduce the ongoing loss of marine biodiversity.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1472-4642 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1254
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Auteur Teulier, L.; Thoral, E.; Queiros, Q.; McKenzie, D.J.; Roussel, D.; Dutto, G.; Gasset, E.; Bourjea, J.; Saraux, C.
Titre Muscle bioenergetics of two emblematic Mediterranean fish species: Sardina pilchardus and Sparus aurata Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Comp. Biochem. Physiol. A-Mol. Integr. Physiol.
Volume 235 Numéro Pages (down) 174-179
Mots-Clés aerobic capacity; Bioenergetics; gait transition; Lipids; Marine fishes; metabolic fuels; pathways; physiology; Red muscle; responses; skeletal-muscle; slow; swimming performance; temperature
Résumé We investigated links between swimming behavior and muscle bioenergetics in two emblematic Mediterranean fish species that have very different ecologies and activity levels. European sardines Sardina pilchardus are pelagic, they swim aerobically, school constantly and have high muscle fat content. Gilthead seabream Sparus aurata are bentho-pelagic, they show discontinuous spontaneous swimming patterns and store less fat in their muscle. Estimating the proportion of red and white muscle phenotypes, sardine exhibited a larger proportion of red muscle (similar to 10% of the body mass) compared to gilthead seabream (similar to 5% of the body mass). We firstly studied red and white muscle fiber bioenergetics, using high-resolution respirometers, showing a 4-fold higher oxidation capacity for red compared to white muscle. Secondly, we aimed to compare the red muscle ability to oxidize either lipids or carbohydrates. Sardine red muscle had a 3-fold higher oxidative capacity than gilthead seabream and a greater capacity to oxidize lipids. This study provides novel insights into physiological mechanisms underlying the different lifestyles of these highly-prized species.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1095-6433 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000481561100018 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2629
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