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Auteur Massol, F.; Dubart, M.; Calcagno, V.; Cazelles, K.; Jacquet, C.; Kefi, S.; Gravel, D. isbn  openurl
  Titre Island Biogeography of Food Webs Type Chapitre de livre
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée  
  Volume Numéro Pages 183-262  
  Mots-Clés animal abundance; body-size; complex networks; coral-reef fishes; coupled chemical-reactions; ecological communities; experimental zoogeography; habitat loss; power-laws; species-area relationship  
  Résumé To understand why and how species invade ecosystems, ecologists have made heavy use of observations of species colonization on islands. The theory of island biogeography, developed in the 1960s by R.H. MacArthur and E.O. Wilson, has had a tremendous impact on how ecologists understand the link between species diversity and characteristics of the habitat such as isolation and size. Recent developments have described how the inclusion of information on trophic interactions can further inform our understanding of island biogeography dynamics. Here, we extend the trophic theory of island biogeography to assess whether certain food web properties on the mainland affect colonization/extinction dynamics of species on islands. Our results highlight that both food web connectance and size on the mainland increase species diversity on islands. We also highlight that more heavily tailed degree distributions in the mainland food web correlate with less frequent but potentially more important extinction cascades on islands. The average shortest path to a basal species on islands follows a hump-shaped curve as a function of realized species richness, with food chains slightly longer than on the mainland at intermediate species richness. More modular mainland webs are also less persistent on islands. We discuss our results in the context of global changes and from the viewpoint of community assembly rules, aiming at pinpointing further theoretical developments needed to make the trophic theory of island biogeography even more useful for fundamental and applied ecology.  
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  Editeur Elsevier Academic Press Inc Lieu de Publication San Diego Éditeur Bohan, D.A.; Dumbrell, A.J.; Massol, F.  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé Networks of Invasion: A Synthesis of Concepts  
  Volume de collection 56 Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN ISBN 978-0-12-804331-8 978-0-12-804338-7 Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2174  
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Auteur Annasawmy, P.; Ternon, J.F.; Marsac, F.; Cherel, Y.; Behagle, N.; Roudaut, G.; Lebourges-Dhaussy, A.; Demarcq, H.; Moloney, C.L.; Jaquemet, S.; Menard, F. doi  openurl
  Titre Micronekton diel migration, community composition and trophic position within two biogeochemical provinces of the South West Indian Ocean: Insight from acoustics and stable isotopes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part I-Oceanogr. Res. Pap.  
  Volume 138 Numéro Pages 85-97  
  Mots-Clés Diel vertical migration; East African Coastal province; equatorial atlantic; feeding ecology; Indian South Subtropical Gyre; large pelagic fishes; mesopelagic fishes; mesoscale features; Micronekton; mozambique channel; myctophid fishes; north-atlantic ocean; respiratory carbon; Trophic level; vertical-distribution  
  Résumé Spatial distribution, community composition and trophic roles of micronekton (crustaceans, fishes and squids) were investigated in the Indian South Subtropical Gyre (ISSG) province and the East African Coastal province (EAFR), by combining acoustic surveys, mid-water trawls and stable isotope analyses from scientific cruises conducted in 2009 and 2010. Mesopelagic micronekton performed diel vertical migrations in both provinces, from deep (400-740 m) to surface (0-200 m) layers at dusk and in the opposite direction at dawn, with some species migrating below 740 m. The EAFR province was more dynamic than the oligotrophic ISSG province, with enhanced eddy activity and enhanced yearly productivity. The active enrichment mechanisms in the EAFR, in terms of available primary production, led to high micronekton acoustic density (as a proxy of micronekton abundance) and large micronekton weight and abundance estimates from trawl data. Particulate organic matter in the EAFR exhibited greater enrichment in C-13 and N-15 compared to the ISSG and, consequently, tissues of selected micronekton organisms in the EAFR were more enriched in N-15 (higher delta N-15 values). In both provinces, micronekton encompassed a wide range of isotopic niches, with large overlaps between species. Micronekton and swordfish in the EAFR had an overlapping range of delta N-15 values, contrasting with the ISSG province where swordfish were two trophic levels higher than the sampled micronekton. Our results provide some evidence that the combined action of riverine input and the dynamics of eddies might influence productivity in the EAFR, and hence the abundance of micronekton and the enrichment of tissues in N-15, compared to the oligotrophic ISSG province.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0637 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2431  
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Auteur Leprieur, F.; Oikonomou, A. url  doi
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  Titre The need for richness-independent measures of turnover when delineating biogeographical regions Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Biogeography  
  Volume 41 Numéro 2 Pages 417-420  
  Mots-Clés Beta diversity; bioregionalization; clustering; compositional dissimilarity; freshwater fishes; species richness; species turnover; β-3 index; βsim index  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1365-2699 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 896  
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Auteur Lucena-Fredou, F.; Kell, L.; Fredou, T.; Gaertner, D.; Potier, M.; Bach, P.; Travassos, P.; Hazin, F.; Menard, F. doi  openurl
  Titre Vulnerability of teleosts caught by the pelagic tuna longline fleets in South Atlantic and Western Indian Oceans Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.  
  Volume 140 Numéro Pages 230-241  
  Mots-Clés Bycatch; climate-change; ecological risk-assessment; exploitation status; Fishery management; impact; life-history strategies; management; marine fishes; Productivity and Susceptibility Analysis; risk; Sustainability; trawl fishery  
  Résumé Productivity and Susceptibility Analysis (PSA) is a methodology for evaluating the vulnerability of a stock based on its biological productivity and susceptibility to fishing. In this study, we evaluated the vulnerability of 60 stocks of tuna, billfishes and other teleosts caught by the tuna longline fleets operating in the South Atlantic and Indian Ocean using a semi-quantitative PSA. We (a) evaluated the vulnerability of the species in the study areas; (b) compared the vulnerability of target and non-target species and oceans; (c) analyzed the sensitivity of data entry; and (d) compared the results of the PSA to other fully quantitative assessment methods. Istiophoridae exhibited the highest scores for vulnerability. The top 10 species at risk were: Atlantic Istiophorus albicans; Indian Ocean Istiompax indica; Atlantic Makaira nigricans and Thunnus alalunga; Indian Ocean Xiphias gladius; Atlantic T. albacares, Gempylus serpens, Ranzania laevis and X. gladius; and Indian Ocean T. alalunga. All species considered at high risk were targeted or were commercialized bycatch, except for the Atlantic G. serpens and R. laevis which.were discarded, and may be considered as a false positive. Those species and others at high risk should be prioritized for further assessment and/or data collection. Most species at moderate risk were bycatch species kept for sale. Conversely, species classified at low risk were mostly discarded. Overall, species at high risk were overfished and/or subjected to overfishing. Moreover, all species considered to be within extinction risk (Critically Endangered, Endangered and Vulnerable) were in the high risk category. The good concordance between approaches corroborates the results of our analysis. PSA is not a replacement for traditional stock assessments, where a stock is assessed at regular intervals to provide management advice. It is of importance, however, where there is uncertainty about catches and life history parameters, since it can identify species at risk, and where management action and data collection is required, e.g. for many species at high and most at moderate risk in the South Atlantic and Indian oceans.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2179  
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Auteur Anderson, P.S.L.; Claverie, T.; Patek, S.N. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Levers And Linkages: Mechanical Trade-Offs In A Power-Amplified System Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Evolution  
  Volume 68 Numéro 7 Pages 1919-1933  
  Mots-Clés amplification; Biomechanics; comparative methods; evolution; kinematic transmission; labrid fishes; mantis shrimp; modularity; morphology; phylogenetic; stomatopods; strike; trade-offs  
  Résumé Mechanical redundancy within a biomechanical system (e. g., many-to-one mapping) allows morphologically divergent organisms to maintain equivalent mechanical outputs. However, most organisms depend on the integration of more than one biomechanical system. Here, we test whether coupled mechanical systems follow a pattern of amplification (mechanical changes are congruent and evolve toward the same functional extreme) or independence (mechanisms evolve independently). We examined the correlated evolution and evolutionary pathways of the coupled four-bar linkage and lever systems in mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda) ultrafast raptorial appendages. We examined models of character evolution in the framework of two divergent groups of stomatopods-“smashers” (hammer-shaped appendages) and “spearers” (bladed appendages). Smashers tended to evolve toward force amplification, whereas spearers evolved toward displacement amplification. These findings show that coupled biomechanical systems can evolve synergistically, thereby resulting in functional amplification rather than mechanical redundancy.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0014-3820 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes <p>ISI Document Delivery No.: AL3TK<br/>Times Cited: 1<br/>Cited Reference Count: 40<br/>Anderson, Philip S. L. Claverie, Thomas Patek, S. N.<br/>National Science Foundation [IOS-1149748]<br/>The authors would like to thank S. Price for extensive assistance on phylogenetic comparative methods and L. Revell for help and advice for using his Phytools package for R. We would also like to thank M. Porter, M. Rosario, P. Green, S. Cox, and K. Kagaya for helpful discussions on stomatopod biology as well as two anonymous reviewers for their insightful comments, which have greatly improved the quality of this article. We also thank K. Reed (National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC) and S. Keable (Australian Museum of Natural History, Sydney) for access to their specimen collections. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation (IOS-1149748) to SNP. The authors declare no conflict of interest.<br/>Wiley-blackwell<br/>Hoboken</p> Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1156  
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