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Auteur Rossi, F.; Gribsholt, B.; Gazeau, F.; Di Santo, V.; Middelburg, J.J.
Titre Complex Effects of Ecosystem Engineer Loss on Benthic Ecosystem Response to Detrital Macroalgae Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée PLoS One
Volume 8 Numéro 6 Pages
Mots-Clés Community structure; assemblages; biodiversity; carbon flow; diversity; experiment; field; impact; marine-sediments; species richness; stability
Résumé Ecosystem engineers change abiotic conditions, community assembly and ecosystem functioning. Consequently, their loss may modify thresholds of ecosystem response to disturbance and undermine ecosystem stability. This study investigates how loss of the bioturbating lugworm Arenicola marina modifies the response to macroalgal detrital enrichment of sediment biogeochemical properties, microphytobenthos and macrofauna assemblages. A field manipulative experiment was done on an intertidal sandflat (Oosterschelde estuary, The Netherlands). Lugworms were deliberately excluded from 1x m sediment plots and different amounts of detrital Ulva (0, 200 or 600 g Wet Weight) were added twice. Sediment biogeochemistry changes were evaluated through benthic respiration, sediment organic carbon content and porewater inorganic carbon as well as detrital macroalgae remaining in the sediment one month after enrichment. Microalgal biomass and macrofauna composition were measured at the same time. Macroalgal carbon mineralization and transfer to the benthic consumers were also investigated during decomposition at low enrichment level (200 g WW). The interaction between lugworm exclusion and detrital enrichment did not modify sediment organic carbon or benthic respiration. Weak but significant changes were instead found for porewater inorganic carbon and microalgal biomass. Lugworm exclusion caused an increase of porewater carbon and a decrease of microalgal biomass, while detrital enrichment drove these values back to values typical of lugworm-dominated sediments. Lugworm exclusion also decreased the amount of macroalgae remaining into the sediment and accelerated detrital carbon mineralization and CO2 release to the water column. Eventually, the interaction between lugworm exclusion and detrital enrichment affected macrofauna abundance and diversity, which collapsed at high level of enrichment only when the lugworms were present. This study reveals that in nature the role of this ecosystem engineer may be variable and sometimes have no or even negative effects on stability, conversely to what it should be expected based on current research knowledge.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1932-6203 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 513
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Auteur Liess, A.; Faithfull, C.; Reichstein, B.; Rowe, O.; Guo, J.; Pete, R.; Thomsson, G.; Uszko, W.; Francoeur, S.N.
Titre Terrestrial runoff may reduce microbenthic net community productivity by increasing turbidity: a Mediterranean coastal lagoon mesocosm experiment Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Hydrobiologia
Volume 753 Numéro 1 Pages 205-218
Mots-Clés Bacteria; Dissolved organic carbon (DOC); Ecology; Enclosure experiment; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Microbenthos; Nutrient subsidy; Terrestrial subsidy; Zoology
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ISSN 0018-8158, 1573-5117 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1338
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Auteur Sebastian, M.; Smith, A.F.; Gonzalez, J.M.; Fredricks, H.F.; Van Mooy, B.; Koblizek, M.; Brandsma, J.; Koster, G.; Mestre, M.; Mostajir, B.; Pitta, P.; Postle, A.D.; Sanchez, P.; Gasol, J.M.; Scanlan, D.J.; Chen, Y.
Titre Lipid remodelling is a widespread strategy in marine heterotrophic bacteria upon phosphorus deficiency Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Isme J.
Volume 10 Numéro 4 Pages 968-978
Mots-Clés 2 enzymes; agrobacterium-tumefaciens; bacterioplankton groups; Ecology; Mediterranean Sea; mesocosm experiment; microbial food-web; north-atlantic ocean; nutrient limitation; phosphate starvation
Résumé Upon phosphorus (P) deficiency, marine phytoplankton reduce their requirements for P by replacing membrane phospholipids with alternative non-phosphorus lipids. It was very recently demonstrated that a SAR11 isolate also shares this capability when phosphate starved in culture. Yet, the extent to which this process occurs in other marine heterotrophic bacteria and in the natural environment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the substitution of membrane phospholipids for a variety of non-phosphorus lipids is a conserved response to P deficiency among phylogenetically diverse marine heterotrophic bacteria, including members of the Alphaproteobacteria and Flavobacteria. By deletion mutagenesis and complementation in the model marine bacterium Phaeobacter sp. MED193 and heterologous expression in recombinant Escherichia coli, we confirm the roles of a phospholipase C (PlcP) and a glycosyltransferase in lipid remodelling. Analyses of the Global Ocean Sampling and Tara Oceans metagenome data sets demonstrate that PlcP is particularly abundant in areas characterized by low phosphate concentrations. Furthermore, we show that lipid remodelling occurs seasonally and responds to changing nutrient conditions in natural microbial communities from the Mediterranean Sea. Together, our results point to the key role of lipid substitution as an adaptive strategy enabling heterotrophic bacteria to thrive in the vast P-depleted areas of the ocean.
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ISSN 1751-7362 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1624
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Auteur van Gils, J.A.; van der Geest, M.; Jansen, E.J.; Govers, L.L.; de Fouw, J.; Piersma, T.
Titre Trophic cascade induced by molluscivore predator alters pore-water biogeochemistry via competitive release of prey Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Ecology
Volume 93 Numéro Pages 1143-1152
Mots-Clés Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania bivalves (Dosinia isocardia, Loripes lucinalis) facilitation growth rate hydrogen sulfide interspecific competition predation predator-exclosure experiment Red Knot, Calidris canutus canutus seagrass beds top-down effect toxicity knots calidris-canutus food webs ecological consequences habitat communities coexistence depletion bivalvia sulfide diet
Résumé Effects of predation may cascade down the food web. By alleviating interspecific competition among prey, predators may promote biodiversity, but the precise mechanisms of how predators alter competition have remained elusive. Here we report on a predator-exclosure experiment carried out in a tropical intertidal ecosystem, providing evidence for a three-level trophic cascade induced by predation by molluscivore Red Knots (Calidris canutus) that affects pore water biogeochemistry. In the exclosures the knots' favorite prey (Dosinia isocardia) became dominant and reduced the individual growth rate in an alternative prey (Loripes lucinalis). Dosinia, a suspension feeder, consumes suspended particulate organic matter (POM), whereas Loripes is a facultative mixotroph, partly living on metabolites produced by sulfur-oxidizing chemoautotrophic bacteria, but also consuming suspended POM. Reduced sulfide concentrations in the exclosures suggest that, without predation on Dosinia, stronger competition for suspended POM forces Loripes to rely on energy produced by endosymbiotic bacteria, thus leading to an enhanced uptake of sulfide from the surrounding pore water. As sulfide is toxic to most organisms, this competition-induced diet shift by Loripes may detoxify the environment, which in turn may facilitate other species. The inference that predators affect the toxicity of their environment via a multi-level trophic cascade is novel, but we believe it may be a general phenomenon in detritus-based ecosystems.
Adresse [van Gils, Jan A.; van der Geest, Matthijs; Jansen, Erik J.; de Fouw, Jimmy; Piersma, Theunis] NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. [Govers, Laura L.] Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Fac Sci, Inst Water & Wetland Res, Dept Environm Sci, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen, Netherlands. [Piersma, Theunis] Univ Groningen, CEES, Anim Ecol Grp, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. van der Geest, M (reprint author), NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, POB 59, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands matthijs.van.der.geest@nioz.nl
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ISSN 0012-9658 ISBN Médium
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Notes ISI Document Delivery No.: 946QK Times Cited: 0 Cited Reference Count: 60 van Gils, Jan A. van der Geest, Matthijs Jansen, Erik J. Govers, Laura L. de Fouw, Jimmy Piersma, Theunis Nwo-wotro[w.01.65.221.00] We are grateful to the staff of the Parc National du Banc d'Arguin for allowing us to work and stay in the area under their management. In 2009 we had the pleasant company of Tjisse van der Heide, Han Olff, and Erik Rosendaal, and in 2010 Brecht De Meulenaer joined us. Erik Rosendaal processed fecal samples, and Jeroen Onrust determined shell dry masses. Dick Visser redrew the figures. This work was funded by the NWO-WOTRO Integrated Programme grant W.01.65.221.00 awarded to T. Piersma. Ecological soc amer Washington Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ 722 collection 1384
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Auteur Massol, F.; Dubart, M.; Calcagno, V.; Cazelles, K.; Jacquet, C.; Kefi, S.; Gravel, D.
Titre Island Biogeography of Food Webs Type Chapitre de livre
Année 2017 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée
Volume Numéro Pages 183-262
Mots-Clés animal abundance; body-size; complex networks; coral-reef fishes; coupled chemical-reactions; ecological communities; experimental zoogeography; habitat loss; power-laws; species-area relationship
Résumé To understand why and how species invade ecosystems, ecologists have made heavy use of observations of species colonization on islands. The theory of island biogeography, developed in the 1960s by R.H. MacArthur and E.O. Wilson, has had a tremendous impact on how ecologists understand the link between species diversity and characteristics of the habitat such as isolation and size. Recent developments have described how the inclusion of information on trophic interactions can further inform our understanding of island biogeography dynamics. Here, we extend the trophic theory of island biogeography to assess whether certain food web properties on the mainland affect colonization/extinction dynamics of species on islands. Our results highlight that both food web connectance and size on the mainland increase species diversity on islands. We also highlight that more heavily tailed degree distributions in the mainland food web correlate with less frequent but potentially more important extinction cascades on islands. The average shortest path to a basal species on islands follows a hump-shaped curve as a function of realized species richness, with food chains slightly longer than on the mainland at intermediate species richness. More modular mainland webs are also less persistent on islands. We discuss our results in the context of global changes and from the viewpoint of community assembly rules, aiming at pinpointing further theoretical developments needed to make the trophic theory of island biogeography even more useful for fundamental and applied ecology.
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Editeur Elsevier Academic Press Inc Lieu de Publication San Diego Éditeur Bohan, D.A.; Dumbrell, A.J.; Massol, F.
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé Networks of Invasion: A Synthesis of Concepts
Volume de collection 56 Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN ISBN 978-0-12-804331-8 978-0-12-804338-7 Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2174
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