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Auteur Borsa, P.; Durand, J.-D.; Chen, W.-J.; Hubert, N.; Muths, D.; Mou-Tham, G.; Kulbicki, M.
Titre Comparative phylogeography of the western Indian Ocean reef fauna Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Acta Oecologica
Volume Numéro Pages 72-86
Mots-Clés Biogeographic province; Endemism; Indo-West Pacific; Mitochondrial DNA; Parsimony network; Reef fish
Résumé Assessing patterns of connectivity at the community and population levels is relevant to marine resource management and conservation. The present study reviews this issue with a focus on the western Indian Ocean (WIO) biogeographic province. This part of the Indian Ocean holds more species than expected from current models of global reef fish species richness. In this study, checklists of reef fish species were examined to determine levels of endemism in each of 10 biogeographic provinces of the Indian Ocean. Results showed that the number of endemic species was higher in the WIO than in any other region of the Indian Ocean. Endemic species from the WIO on the average had a larger body size than elsewhere in the tropical Indian Ocean. This suggests an effect of peripheral speciation, as previously documented in the Hawaiian reef fish fauna, relative to other sites in the tropical western Pacific. To explore evolutionary dynamics of species across biogeographic provinces and infer mechanisms of speciation, we present and compare the results of phylogeographic surveys based on compilations of published and unpublished mitochondrial DNA sequences for 19 Indo-Pacific reef-associated fishes (rainbow grouper Cephalopholis argus, scrawled butterflyfish Chaetodon meyeri, bluespot mullet Crenimugil sp. A, humbug damselfish Dascyllus abudafur/Dascyllus aruanus, areolate grouper Epinephelus areolatus, blacktip grouper Epinephelus fasciatus, honeycomb grouper Epinephelus merra, bluespotted cornetfish Fistularia commersonii, cleaner wrasse Labroides sp. 1, longface emperor Lethrinus sp. A, bluestripe snapper Lutjanus kasmira, unicornfishes Naso brevirosris, Naso unicornis and Naso vlamingii, blue-spotted maskray Neotrygon kuhlii, largescale mullet Planiliza macrolepis, common parrotfish Scarus psicattus, crescent grunter Terapon jarbua, whitetip reef shark Triaenodon obesus) and three coastal Indo-West Pacific invertebrates (blue seastar Linckia laevigata, spiny lobster Panulirus homarus, small giant clam Tridacna maxima). Heterogeneous and often unbalanced sampling design, paucity of data in a number of cases, and among-species discrepancy in phylogeographic structure precluded any generalization regarding phylogeographic patterns. Nevertheless, the WIO might have been a source of haplotypes in some cases and it also harboured an endemic clade in at least one case. The present survey also highlighted likely cryptic species. This may eventually affect the accuracy of the current checklists of species, which form the basis of some of the recent advances in Indo-West Pacific marine ecology and biogeography.
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Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Îles Éparses (French Scattered Islands, SW Indian Ocean) as reference ecosystems for environmental research. Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection 72 Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1146-609x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1489
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Auteur Dias, M.S.; Oberdorff, T.; Hugueny, B.; Leprieur, F.; Jezequel, C.; Cornu, J.F.; Brosse, S.; Grenouillet, G.; Tedesco, P.A.
Titre Global imprint of historical connectivity on freshwater fish biodiversity Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology Letters
Volume 17 Numéro 9 Pages 1130-1140
Mots-Clés Alpha diversity; Beta diversity; Biogeography; Quaternary climate changes; africa; climate changes; contemporary; diversity patterns; endemism; evolution; freshwater fish; global; history; north-america; richness; river systems; scale; sea-level changes; species turnover; species-richness
Résumé The relative importance of contemporary and historical processes is central for understanding biodiversity patterns. While several studies show that past conditions can partly explain the current biodiversity patterns, the role of history remains elusive. We reconstructed palaeo-drainage basins under lower sea level conditions (Last Glacial Maximum) to test whether the historical connectivity between basins left an imprint on the global patterns of freshwater fish biodiversity. After controlling for contemporary and past environmental conditions, we found that palaeo-connected basins displayed greater species richness but lower levels of endemism and beta diversity than did palaeo-disconnected basins. Palaeo-connected basins exhibited shallower distance decay of compositional similarity, suggesting that palaeo-river connections favoured the exchange of fish species. Finally, we found that a longer period of palaeo-connection resulted in lower levels of beta diversity. These findings reveal the first unambiguous results of the role played by history in explaining the global contemporary patterns of biodiversity.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 631
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Auteur Gaboriau, T.; Leprieur, F.; Mouillot, D.; Hubert, N.
Titre Influence of the geography of speciation on current patterns of coral reef fish biodiversity across the Indo-Pacific Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography
Volume 41 Numéro 8 Pages 1295-1306
Mots-Clés damselfishes pomacentridae; evolutionary history; family labridae; global patterns; marine biodiversity; maximum-likelihood; peripheral endemism; phylogenies; species richness; west pacific
Résumé The role of speciation processes in shaping current biodiversity patterns represents a major scientific question for ecologists and biogeographers. Hence, numerous methods have been developed to determine the geography of speciation based on co-occurrence between sister-species. Most of these methods rely on the correlation between divergence time and several metrics based on the geographic ranges of sister-taxa (i.e. overlap, asymmetry). The relationship between divergence time and these metrics has scarcely been examined in a spatial context beyond regression curves. Mapping this relationship across spatial grids, however, may unravel how speciation processes have shaped current biodiversity patterns through space and time. This can be particularly relevant for coral reef fishes of the Indo-Pacific since the origin of the exceptional concentration of biodiversity in the Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA) has been actively debated, with several alternative hypotheses involving species diversification and dispersal. We reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships between three species-rich families of coral reef fish (Chaetodontidae, Labridae, Pomacentridae) and calculated co-occurrence metrics between closely related lineages of those families. We demonstrated that repeated biogeographic processes can be identified in present-day species distribution by projecting co-occurrence metrics between related lineages in a geographical context. Our study also evidence that sister-species do not co-occur randomly across the Indo-Pacific, but tend to overlap their range within the IAA. We identified the imprint of two important biogeographic processes that caused this pattern in 48% of the sister-taxa considered: speciation events within the IAA and repeated divergence between the Indian and Pacific Ocean, with subsequent secondary contact in the IAA.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2388
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Auteur Mazel, F.; Guilhaumon, F.; Mouquet, N.; Devictor, V.; Gravel, D.; Renaud, J.; Cianciaruso, M.V.; Loyola, R.; Diniz, J.A.F.; Mouillot, D.; Thuiller, W.
Titre Multifaceted diversity-area relationships reveal global hotspots of mammalian species, trait and lineage diversity Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography
Volume 23 Numéro 8 Pages 836-847
Mots-Clés Conservation biogeography; Hill's numbers; biodiversity hotspots; congruent; conservation priorities; diversity indices; ecoregions; endemism; evolutionary; functional diversity-area; histories; mammals; phylogenetic diversity; phylogenetic diversity-area; relationship; richness gradients; spatial-patterns; species-area relationship
Résumé Aim To define biome-scale hotspots of phylogenetic and functional mammalian biodiversity (PD and FD, respectively) and compare them with 'classical' hotspots based on species richness (SR) alone. Location Global. Methods SR, PD and FD were computed for 782 terrestrial ecoregions using the distribution ranges of 4616 mammalian species. We used a set of comprehensive diversity indices unified by a recent framework incorporating the relative species coverage in each ecoregion. We built large-scale multifaceted diversity-area relationships to rank ecoregions according to their levels of biodiversity while accounting for the effect of area on each facet of diversity. Finally we defined hotspots as the top-ranked ecoregions. Results While ignoring relative species coverage led to a fairly good congruence between biome-scale top ranked SR, PD and FD hotspots, ecoregions harbouring a rich and abundantly represented evolutionary history and FD did not match with the top-ranked ecoregions defined by SR. More importantly PD and FD hotspots showed important spatial mismatches. We also found that FD and PD generally reached their maximum values faster than SR as a function of area. Main conclusions The fact that PD/FD reach their maximum value faster than SR could suggest that the two former facets might be less vulnerable to habitat loss than the latter. While this point is expected, it is the first time that it has been quantified at a global scale and should have important consequences for conservation. Incorporating relative species coverage into the delineation of multifaceted hotspots of diversity led to weak congruence between SR, PD and FD hotspots. This means that maximizing species number may fail to preserve those nodes (in the phylogenetic or functional tree) that are relatively abundant in the ecoregion. As a consequence it may be of prime importance to adopt a multifaceted biodiversity perspective to inform conservation strategies at a global scale.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 722
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Auteur Oikonomou, A.; Leprieur, F.; Leonardos, I.D.
Titre Biogeography of freshwater fishes of the Balkan Peninsula Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Hydrobiologia
Volume 738 Numéro 1 Pages 205-220
Mots-Clés Balkan Peninsula; Beta diversity; Bioregionalisation; Conservation biogeography; Vulnerability; ancient lakes; biodiversity conservation; endemism; freshwater fish; global patterns; mitochondrial-dna sequences; north-america; phylogeography; species richness
Résumé Delineating biogeographical regions is a critical step towards the establishment and evaluation of conservation priorities. In the present study, we analysed the distribution patterns of the freshwater fish of an understudied European biodiversity hotspot, the Balkan Peninsula. Based on the most extensive available database of native freshwater fish species distributions, we performed a hierarchical clustering analysis to identify the major biogeographical regions of the Balkan Peninsula. We also highlighted the 'hottest hotspots' of freshwater fish diversity across the delimited biogeographical regions by describing the patterns of species richness, endemic and vulnerable species; indicator species were also determined. The bioregionalisation scheme consisted of eight groups of drainage basins that correspond to distinct regions of the Balkan Peninsula. Overall, the delineated biogeographical regions varied in terms of species richness, endemism, vulnerability (i.e. extinction threats) and indicator species composition. From a conservation perspective, this study emphasises the prioritisation of areas characterised by high levels of irreplaceability (endemism) and vulnerability (i.e. the Attikobeotia region, Ionian Sea and Prespa Lakes) and stresses the necessity of implementing a network of protected freshwater areas across the Balkan Peninsula.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0018-8158 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 454
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