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Auteur Longépée, E.; Ahmed Abdallah, A.; Jeanson, M.; Golléty, C. url  doi
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  Titre Local Ecological Knowledge on Mangroves in Mayotte Island (Indian Ocean) and Influencing Factors Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2021 Publication Revue Abrégée Forests  
  Volume 12 Numéro 1 Pages 53  
  Mots-Clés ecosystem services; ethnoscience; interdisciplinary; socio-ecological systems  
  Résumé The majority of studies on local ecological knowledge (LEK) relate to communities or groups relying on ecosystem(s) for their livelihood. In our case study, Mayotte Island, a French overseas department, very few people rely on mangrove ecosystem for natural resources but most of them are attached to it because of leisure activities and beliefs. The questions on mangrove LEK generally deal with a single aspect of ecological knowledge of surveyed people and is mixed with other information such as harvesting practices, anthropogenic impacts, and management issues. The aim of our study is to better understand the level of ecological knowledge of surveyed inhabitants of Mayotte and to assess whether factors linked to the profile of respondents have an influence on it. For this purpose, we carried out two main survey campaigns in three villages fringing two stable mangroves of Mayotte: the first one consisted of qualitative interviews and the second one, questionnaires lending quantitative results. Cross tabulations and Chi square tests of independence were carried out to determine the link between LEK and influencing factors. Results show that some LEK implying localized observation, such as the identification of mangrove trees and the knowledge of the coastal protection role of the mangrove, are well shared by surveyed people whereas others, such as the number and the name of mangrove tree species, are poorly known. The results also highlight the difficulty of questions implying observation at the landscape level and interpretation of observation. All the influencing factors selected have a significant influence on, at least, one LEK variable. The results highlight differences in LEK of villages bordering two nearby mangroves calling for a local management of these systems.  
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  Notes WOS:000610230100001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2938  
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Auteur Sy, M.M.; Rey-Valette, H.; Figuières, C.; Simier, M.; De Wit, R. url  doi
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  Titre The impact of academic information supply and familiarity on preferences for ecosystem services Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2021 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecological Economics  
  Volume 183 Numéro Pages 106959  
  Mots-Clés Citizens’ workshop; Coastal lagoons; Cultural ecosystem services (CES); Paternalism; Preference elicitation; Veil of ignorance  
  Résumé Preferences elicitation can be a challenging exercise for citizens participating in assessment surveys. It is even more challenging when it comes to complex and unfamiliar ecosystems and the threatened ecosystem services they provide. Making people aware of the characteristics of the ecosystem services being valued is determinant for the assessment process. We investigated the impact of familiarity and academic information supply on people's preferences for twenty selected ecosystem services of French Mediterranean coastal lagoons. The results show that regardless of familiarity and information supply, there is a strong consensus about the highest importance of regulation and maintenance ecosystem services as well as environmental education and research opportunity ecosystem services. By contrast, nine of the cultural ecosystem services, together with two provisioning ecosystem services showed heterogeneous preferences among the different citizen groups. Using a combination of descriptive and inferential statistics these eleven ecosystem services split up into three clusters characterized as (i) contemplative leisure, (ii) heritage, and (iii) consumptive activities. Familiarity and academic information supply had a strong impact on the preferences for these three clusters of ecosystem services.  
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  ISSN 0921-8009 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2939  
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Auteur Dittami, S.M.; Arboleda, E.; Auguet, J.-C.; Bigalke, A.; Briand, E.; Cardenas, P.; Cardini, U.; Decelle, J.; Engelen, A.H.; Eveillard, D.; Gachoni, C.M.M.; Griffiths, S.M.; Harder, T.; Kayal, E.; Kazamia, E.; Lathier, F.H.; Medina, M.; Marzinelli, E.M.; Morganti, T.M.; Pons, L.N.; Prado, S.; Pintado, J.; Saha, M.; selosse, M.-A.; Skillings, D.; Stock, W.; Sunagawa, S.; Toulza, E.; Vorobev, A.; Leblanc, C.; Not, F. doi  openurl
  Titre A community perspective on the concept of marine holobionts: current status, challenges, and future directions Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2021 Publication Revue Abrégée PeerJ  
  Volume 9 Numéro Pages e10911  
  Mots-Clés animals; bacterial interactions; coral-reef fish; diversity; Dysbiosis; ecology; Ecosystem services; evolution; Evolution; Host-microbiota interactions; Marine holobionts; microbiome; microorganisms; plant; symbiosis; Symbiosis  
  Résumé Host-microbe interactions play crucial roles in marine ecosystems. However, we still have very little understanding of the mechanisms that govern these relationships, the evolutionary processes that shape them, and their ecological consequences. The holobiont concept is a renewed paradigm in biology that can help to describe and understand these complex systems. It posits that a host and its associated microbiota with which it interacts, form a holobiont, and have to be studied together as a coherent biological and functional unit to understand its biology, ecology, and evolution. Here we discuss critical concepts and opportunities in marine holobiont research and identify key challenges in the field. We highlight the potential economic, sociological, and environmental impacts of the holobiont concept in marine biological, evolutionary, and environmental sciences. Given the connectivity and the unexplored biodiversity specific to marine ecosystems, a deeper understanding of such complex systems requires further technological and conceptual advances, e.g., the development of controlled experimental model systems for holobionts from all major lineages and the modeling of (info)chemical-mediated interactions between organisms. Here we propose that one significant challenge is to bridge cross-disciplinary research on tractable model systems in order to address key ecological and evolutionary questions. This first step is crucial to decipher the main drivers of the dynamics and evolution of holobionts and to account for the holobiont concept in applied areas, such as the conservation, management, and exploitation of marine ecosystems and resources, where practical solutions to predict and mitigate the impact of human activities are more important than ever.  
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  ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes WOS:000621591900009 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2995  
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Auteur Arneth, A.; Shin, Y.-J.; Leadley, P.; Rondinini, C.; Bukvareva, E.; Kolb, M.; Midgley, G.F.; Oberdorff, T.; Palomo, I.; Saito, O. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Post-2020 biodiversity targets need to embrace climate change Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Pnas  
  Volume 117 Numéro 49 Pages 30882-30891  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; ecosystem services; policy; sustainability  
  Résumé Recent assessment reports by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) have highlighted the risks to humanity arising from the unsustainable use of natural resources. Thus far, land, freshwater, and ocean exploitation have been the chief causes of biodiversity loss. Climate change is projected to be a rapidly increasing additional driver for biodiversity loss. Since climate change and biodiversity loss impact human societies everywhere, bold solutions are required that integrate environmental and societal objectives. As yet, most existing international biodiversity targets have overlooked climate change impacts. At the same time, climate change mitigation measures themselves may harm biodiversity directly. The Convention on Biological Diversity’s post-2020 framework offers the important opportunity to address the interactions between climate change and biodiversity and revise biodiversity targets accordingly by better aligning these with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Paris Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals. We identify the considerable number of existing and proposed post-2020 biodiversity targets that risk being severely compromised due to climate change, even if other barriers to their achievement were removed. Our analysis suggests that the next set of biodiversity targets explicitly addresses climate change-related risks since many aspirational goals will not be feasible under even lower-end projections of future warming. Adopting more flexible and dynamic approaches to conservation, rather than static goals, would allow us to respond flexibly to changes in habitats, genetic resources, species composition, and ecosystem functioning and leverage biodiversity’s capacity to contribute to climate change mitigation and adaptation.  
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  ISSN 0027-8424, 1091-6490 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes WOS:000598977500007 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2922  
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Auteur Beckensteiner, J.; Kaplan, D.M.; Scheld, A.M. doi  openurl
  Titre Barriers to Eastern Oyster Aquaculture Expansion in Virginia Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 7 Numéro Pages 53  
  Mots-Clés beta regression; Chesapeake Bay; conservation; Crassostrea virginica; crassostrea-virginica; ecosystem services; impact; management; marine aquaculture; oyster aquaculture; political economics; restoration; social acceptability; spatial management; user conflicts  
  Résumé The eastern oyster once provided major societal and ecosystem benefits, but these benefits have been threatened in recent decades by large declines in oyster harvests. In many areas, recovery of oyster aquaculture faces significant societal opposition and spatial constraints limiting its ability to meet expectations regarding future food needs and provision of ecosystem services. In Virginia, oyster aquaculture has begun to expand, concurrent with an increase in subaqueous leased areas (over 130,000 acres of grounds are currently leased). Though private leases must in theory be used for oyster production, in practice, they can be held for other reasons, such as speculation or intentional exclusion of others. These factors have led to large variation over time and space in the use of leases in lower Chesapeake Bay; and privately leased grounds are now thought to be underutilized for oyster production. This research examined potential barriers to expansion of oyster aquaculture in Virginia. We first evaluated if a lack of space was limiting industry expansion and quantified temporal and spatial trends in the use and productivity of leases. Then, differences in used and non-used leases were investigated in relation to variables thought to be related to “not in my backyard” attitudes, congestion, speculation, local economic and environmental conditions. Finally, the performance of the Virginia leasing system was compared with those in other states along the U.S. East and Gulf Coasts. We found limited evidence for spatial constraints on aquaculture leasing, but strong evidence for social and regulatory inefficiencies. Although rates of lease use increased from 2006 to 2016, only 33% of leases were ever used for oyster production and about 63% of leaseholders reported no commercial harvests. Non-used leases tended to be smaller, and were found in more populated, high-income regions, consistent with both speculative and exclusionary uses. Virginia had the second lowest level of total production of cultured oysters per leased acre among the states on the East and Gulf Coasts of the United States. These results indicate that there is room for oyster aquaculture expansion in Virginia if societal, regulatory, and economic barriers can be reduced or if existing leased areas are used more efficiently.  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2748  
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