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Auteur Maire, E.; Villeger, S.; Graham, N.A.J.; Hoey, A.S.; Cinner, J.; Ferse, S.C.A.; Aliaume, C.; Booth, D.J.; Feary, D.A.; Kulbicki, M.; Sandin, S.A.; Vigliola, L.; Mouillot, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Community-wide scan identifies fish species associated with coral reef services across the Indo-Pacific Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.  
  Volume (down) 285 Numéro 1883 Pages 20181167  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; climate-change; coral reefs; diversity; ecosystem functioning; ecosystem services; ecosystem-function; fish community; impact; key species; multifunctionality; productivity; redundancy; resilience; resistance  
  Résumé Determining whether many functionally complementary species or only a subset of key species are necessary to maintain ecosystem functioning and services is a critical question in community ecology and biodiversity conservation. Identifying such key species remains challenging, especially in the tropics where many species co-occur and can potentially support the same or different processes. Here, we developed a new community-wide scan CWS) approach, analogous to the genome-wide scan, to identify fish species that significantly contribute, beyond the socio-environmental and species richness effects, to the biomass and coral cover on Indo-Pacific reefs. We found that only a limited set of species (51 out of approx. 400, = approx. 13%), belonging to various functional groups and evolutionary lineages, are strongly and positively associated with fish biomass and live coral cover. Many of these species have not previously been identified as functionally important, and thus may be involved in unknown, yet important, biological mechanisms that help sustain healthy and productive coral reefs. CWS has the potential to reveal species that are key to ecosystem functioning and services and to guide management strategies as well as new experiments to decipher underlying causal ecological processes.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2392  
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Auteur Mouquet, N.; Devictor, V.; Meynard, C.N.; Munoz, F.; Bersier, L.-F.; Chave, J.; Couteron, P.; Dalecky, A.; Fontaine, C.; Gravel, D.; Hardy, O.J.; Jabot, F.; Lavergne, S.; Leibold, M.; Mouillot, D.; Münkemüller, T.; Pavoine, S.; Prinzing, A.; Rodrigues, A.S.L.; Rohr, R.P.; Thébault, E.; Thuiller, W. url  doi
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  Titre Ecophylogenetics: advances and perspectives Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Biological Reviews  
  Volume (down) 87 Numéro 4 Pages 769-785  
  Mots-Clés community ecology; conservation biology; ecological networks; ecophylogenetics; Ecosystem functioning; evolution; phylogenetics  
  Résumé Ecophylogenetics can be viewed as an emerging fusion of ecology, biogeography and macroevolution. This new and fast-growing field is promoting the incorporation of evolution and historical contingencies into the ecological research agenda through the widespread use of phylogenetic data. Including phylogeny into ecological thinking represents an opportunity for biologists from different fields to collaborate and has provided promising avenues of research in both theoretical and empirical ecology, towards a better understanding of the assembly of communities, the functioning of ecosystems and their responses to environmental changes. The time is ripe to assess critically the extent to which the integration of phylogeny into these different fields of ecology has delivered on its promise. Here we review how phylogenetic information has been used to identify better the key components of species interactions with their biotic and abiotic environments, to determine the relationships between diversity and ecosystem functioning and ultimately to establish good management practices to protect overall biodiversity in the face of global change. We evaluate the relevance of information provided by phylogenies to ecologists, highlighting current potential weaknesses and needs for future developments. We suggest that despite the strong progress that has been made, a consistent unified framework is still missing to link local ecological dynamics to macroevolution. This is a necessary step in order to interpret observed phylogenetic patterns in a wider ecological context. Beyond the fundamental question of how evolutionary history contributes to shape communities, ecophylogenetics will help ecology to become a better integrative and predictive science.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1469-185x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 556  
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Auteur Violle, C.; Thuiller, W.; Mouquet, N.; Munoz, F.; Kraft, N.J.B.; Cadotte, M.W.; Livingstone, S.W.; Mouillot, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Functional Rarity: The Ecology of Outliers Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Trends Ecol. Evol.  
  Volume (down) 32 Numéro 5 Pages 356-367  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; community ecology; Conservation; ecosystem function; intraspecific variability; niche; phylogenetic diversity; plant-communities; spatial mismatch; trait  
  Résumé Rarity has been a central topic for conservation and evolutionary biologists aiming to determine the species characteristics that cause extinction risk. More recently, beyond the rarity of species, the rarity of functions or functional traits, called functional rarity, has gained momentum in helping to understand the impact of biodiversity decline on ecosystem functioning. However, a conceptual framework for defining and quantifying functional rarity is still lacking. We introduce 12 different forms of functional rarity along gradients of species scarcity and trait distinctiveness. We then highlight the potential key role of functional rarity in the long-term and large-scale maintenance of ecosystem processes, as well as the necessary linkage between functional and evolutionary rarity.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0169-5347 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2131  
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Auteur McLean, M.; Mouillot, D.; Lindegren, M.; Villeger, S.; Engelhard, G.; Murgier, J.; Auber, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Fish communities diverge in species but converge in traits over three decades of warming Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.  
  Volume (down) 25 Numéro 11 Pages 3972-3984  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; biotic homogenization; climate change; climate-change; community ecology; consequences; ecological traits; ecology; ecosystem functioning; fisheries; functional diversity; north-sea; patterns; plant traits; regime shift; shelf seas; spatio-temporal dynamics  
  Résumé Describing the spatial and temporal dynamics of communities is essential for understanding the impacts of global environmental change on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Trait-based approaches can provide better insight than species-based (i.e. taxonomic) approaches into community assembly and ecosystem functioning, but comparing species and trait dynamics may reveal important patterns for understanding community responses to environmental change. Here, we used a 33-year database of fish monitoring to compare the spatio-temporal dynamics of taxonomic and trait structure in North Sea fish communities. We found that the majority of variation in both taxonomic and trait structure was explained by a pronounced spatial gradient, with distinct communities in the southern and northern North Sea related to depth, sea surface temperature, salinity and bed shear stress. Both taxonomic and trait structure changed significantly over time; however taxonomically, communities in the south and north diverged towards different species, becoming more dissimilar over time, yet they converged towards the same traits regardless of species differences. In particular, communities shifted towards smaller, faster growing species with higher thermal preferences and pelagic water column position. Although taxonomic structure changed over time, its spatial distribution remained relatively stable, whereas in trait structure, the southern zone of the North Sea shifted northward and expanded, leading to homogenization. Our findings suggest that global environmental change, notably climate warming, will lead to convergence towards traits more adapted for novel environments regardless of species composition.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000482780600001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2639  
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Auteur McLean, M.; Auber, A.; Graham, N.A.J.; Houk, P.; Villeger, S.; Violle, C.; Thuiller, W.; Wilson, S.K.; Mouillot, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Trait structure and redundancy determine sensitivity to disturbance in marine fish communities Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.  
  Volume (down) 25 Numéro 10 Pages 3424-3437  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; climate change; climate-change; coral reefs; coral-reef fish; diversity stability; ecological traits; ecosystem functioning; ecosystem productivity; egg buoyancy; English Channel; functional diversity; functional redundancy; north-sea; regime shifts; response diversity; vulnerability  
  Résumé Trait diversity is believed to influence ecosystem dynamics through links between organismal traits and ecosystem processes. Theory predicts that key traits and high trait redundancy-large species richness and abundance supporting the same traits-can buffer communities against environmental disturbances. While experiments and data from simple ecological systems lend support, large-scale evidence from diverse, natural systems under major disturbance is lacking. Here, using long-term data from both temperate (English Channel) and tropical (Seychelles Islands) fishes, we show that sensitivity to disturbance depends on communities' initial trait structure and initial trait redundancy. In both ecosystems, we found that increasing dominance by climatically vulnerable traits (e.g., small, fast-growing pelagics/corallivores) rendered fish communities more sensitive to environmental change, while communities with higher trait redundancy were more resistant. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the influence of trait structure and redundancy on community sensitivity over large temporal and spatial scales in natural systems. Our results exemplify a consistent link between biological structure and community sensitivity that may be transferable across ecosystems and taxa and could help anticipate future disturbance impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000486150200018 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2652  
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