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Auteur McLean, M.; Mouillot, D.; Villeger, S.; Graham, N.A.J.; Auber, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Interspecific differences in environmental response blur trait dynamics in classic statistical analyses Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Biol.  
  Volume 166 Numéro 12 Pages 152  
  Mots-Clés climate-change; community composition; ecology; framework; functional diversity; impact; rules  
  Résumé Trait-based ecology strives to better understand how species, through their bio-ecological traits, respond to environmental changes, and influence ecosystem functioning. Identifying which traits are most responsive to environmental changes can provide insight for understanding community structuring and developing sustainable management practices. However, misinterpretations are possible, because standard statistical methods (e.g., principal component analysis and linear regression) for identifying and ranking the responses of different traits to environmental changes ignore interspecific differences. Here, using both artificial data and real-world examples from marine fish communities, we show how considering species-specific responses can lead to drastically different results than standard community-level methods. By demonstrating the potential impacts of interspecific differences on trait dynamics, we illuminate a major, yet rarely discussed issue, highlighting how analytical misinterpretations can confound our basic understanding of trait responses, which could have important consequences for biodiversity conservation.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0025-3162 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000496131000001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2660  
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Auteur Lagarde, F.; Fiandrino, A.; Ubertini, M.; d'Orbcastel, E.R.; Mortreux, S.; Chiantella, C.; Bec, B.; Bonnet, D.; Roques, C.; Bernard, I.; Richard, M.; Guyondet, T.; Pouvreau, S.; Lett, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Duality of trophic supply and hydrodynamic connectivity drives spatial patterns of Pacific oyster recruitment Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Ecology Progress Series  
  Volume 632 Numéro Pages 81-100  
  Mots-Clés Coastal lagoon; Connectivity; Crassostrea gigas; Larval ecology; Oligotrophication; Recruitment; Settlement; Spatial patterns  
  Résumé The recent discovery of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas (also known as Magallana gigas) spatfields in a Mediterranean lagoon intensely exploited for shellfish farming (Thau lagoon) revealed significant contrasts in spatial patterns of recruitment. We evaluated the processes that drive spatial patterns in oyster recruitment by comparing observed recruitment, simulated hydrodynamic connectivity and ecological variables. We hypothesized that spatial variability of recruitment depends on (1) hydrodynamic connectivity and (2) the ecology of the larval supply, settlement, metamorphosis, survival and biotic environmental parameters. We assessed recruitment at 6-8 experimental sites by larval sampling and spat collection inside and outside oyster farming areas and on an east-west gradient, from 2012-2014. Hydrodynamic connectivity was simulated using a numerical 3D transport model assessed with a Eulerian indicator. The supply of large umbo larvae did not differ significantly inside and outside oyster farming areas, whereas the supply of pediveligers to sites outside shellfish farms was structured by hydrodynamic connectivity. Inside shellfish farming zones, unfavorable conditions due to trophic competition with filter-feeders jeopardized their settlement. In this case, our results suggest loss of settlement competence by oyster larvae. This confirms our hypothesis of top-down trophic control by the oysters inside farming zones of Thau lagoon in summer that fails to meet the ecological requirements of these areas as oyster nurseries. Knowledge of oyster dispersal, connectivity and recruitment in coastal lagoons will help local development of sustainable natural spat collection. On a global scale, our method could be transposed to other basins or used for other species such as mussels, clams or scallops, to better understand the spatial patterns of bivalve recruitment. Management of the oyster industry based on natural spat collection will help develop a sustainable activity, based on locally adapted oyster strains but also by reducing the risks of transferring pathogens between basins and the global carbon footprint of this industry.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630, 1616-1599 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2673  
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Auteur Manna, L.R.; Villeger, S.; Rezende, C.F.; Mazzoni, R. doi  openurl
  Titre High intraspecific variability in morphology and diet in tropical stream fish communities Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Freshw. Fish  
  Volume 28 Numéro 1 Pages 41-52  
  Mots-Clés approach reveals; assemblages; body-size; community ecology; competition; ecology; functional diversity; functional traits; habitat use; originality; plasticity; rainforest stream; savannah stream; specialisation; specialization; traits  
  Résumé Functional diversity of fish communities has been measured according to (a) interspecific variability, assuming that intraspecific variability is negligible, or (b) morphological differences, as good descriptors of complex functions, such as diet. These two assumptions have been scarcely tested on the individual level, especially in species-rich tropical ecosystems. Here, we adapted intraspecific specialisation (ISpe) and intraspecific originality indices (IOri) to assess complementary components of intraspecific variability. Next, we applied these indices to evaluate the intra- and interspecific variability of morphological and diet traits in two contrasting Brazilian stream-dwelling fish assemblages (rainforest and savannah). We also compared correlations between morphology and diet at the individual and species level to test whether accounting for intraspecific variability increases the predictability of diet due to morphological differences. Significant contributions of intraspecific variability to differences between fish were revealed for morphology and diet. Intraspecific variability in the diet was higher than that in morphology in both assemblages. The ISpe was positively correlated to IOri in the diet of both ecosystems. The morphological-dietary relationships were significant but weak at both individual and species levels. Our findings highlight the importance of measuring individual variability and accounting for complementary components of the intraspecific variability (ISpe and IOri). Importantly, we showed that the variability in morphology does not predict diet variability at both intra- and interspecific levels. Thus, high intraspecific variability in morphology and diet challenges the use of functional traits measured at the species level to describe the functional diversity of different fish assemblages.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0906-6691 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2472  
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Auteur Su, G.; Villeger, S.; Brosse, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Morphological diversity of freshwater fishes differs between realms, but morphologically extreme species are widespread Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 28 Numéro 2 Pages 211-221  
  Mots-Clés diet; ecology; patterns; vulnerability; richness; freshwater fish; functional diversity; extinction risk; traits; biogeographical realms; functional redundancy; functional vulnerability; mismatch; morphological traits; morphologically extreme species; rivers  
  Résumé Aim The aim was to analyse the morphological diversity of the world freshwater fish fauna. We tested to which extent the distributions of morphological traits are supported by extreme morphologies and how those extreme morphologies are distributed among realms and affect the functional vulnerability. We also analysed the contribution of between- and within-order morphological variability to the morphological differences between realms. Major taxa studied Freshwater fish. Location Global. Time period 1960s-2010s. Methods We used a global database of freshwater fishes from the six realms. Ten morphological traits were measured on 9,150 species, that is, 75% of the ca. 13,000 freshwater fish species. A principal components analysis was conducted to combine the 10 traits into a multidimensional space. We used Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests to compare the difference in morphological diversity between the six realms and between and within the major fish orders. We then identified the morphologically extreme species and quantified their contributions to the morphological range to assess the functional vulnerability and redundancy of fish faunas in the six biogeographical realms for freshwater ecosystems. Results We report a strong morphological variability among freshwater fishes of the world, with significant morphological differences among realm fish faunas, caused by an interplay between taxonomic composition of the realm faunas and morphological differences within orders among the realms. Morphologically extreme species accounted for a large percentage of the filling of the global morphological space and are distributed throughout the world. Main conclusions Fish morphological diversity is largely supported by a few species with extreme trait combinations, indicating that functional vulnerability exists throughout the world. Our results suggest that more attention should be paid to these morphologically extreme species and that they should be protected to ensure the sustainability of functions they support.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-822x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2528  
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Auteur Aubin, J.; Callier, M.; Rey-Valette, H.; Mathe, S.; Wilfart, A.; Legendre, M.; Slembrouck, J.; Caruso, D.; Chia, E.; Masson, G.; Blancheton, J.P.; Ediwarman; Haryadi, J.; Prihadi, T.H.; Casaca, J. de M.; Tamassia, S.T.J.; Tocqueville, A.; Fontaine, P. doi  openurl
  Titre Implementing ecological intensification in fish farming: definition and principles from contrasting experiences Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Rev. Aquac.  
  Volume 11 Numéro 1 Pages 149-167  
  Mots-Clés agriculture; agroecology; animal production; aquaculture systems; ecosystem services; emergy accounting; environmental-impact; information; life cycle assessment; life-cycle assessment; mekong delta; perception; responsible aquaculture; sustainable aquaculture; system  
  Résumé Ecological intensification is a new concept in agriculture that addresses the double challenge of maintaining a level of production sufficient to support needs of human populations and respecting the environment in order to conserve the natural world and human quality of life. This article adapts this concept to fish farming using agroecological principles and the ecosystem services framework. The method was developed from the study of published literature and applications at four study sites chosen for their differences in production intensity: polyculture ponds in France, integrated pig and pond polyculture in Brazil, the culture of striped catfish in Indonesia and a recirculating salmon aquaculture system in France. The study of stakeholders' perceptions of ecosystem services combined with environmental assessment through Life Cycle Assessment and Emergy accounting allowed development of an assessment tool that was used as a basis for co-building evolution scenarios. From this experience, ecological intensification of aquaculture was defined as the use of ecological processes and functions to increase productivity, strengthen ecosystem services and decrease disservices. It is based on aquaecosystem and biodiversity management and the use of local and traditional knowledge. Expected consequences for farming systems consist of greater autonomy, efficiency and better integration into their surrounding territories. Ecological intensification requires territorial governance and helps improve it from a sustainable development perspective.  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1753-5123 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2537  
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