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Auteur Navarro, J.; López, L.; Coll, M.; Barría, C.; Sáez-Liante, R.
Titre Short- and long-term importance of small sharks in the diet of the rare deep-sea shark Dalatias licha Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar Biol
Volume (down) 161 Numéro 7 Pages 1697-1707
Mots-Clés Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Marine & Freshwater Sciences; Microbiology; Oceanography; Zoology
Résumé Knowing the trophic ecology of marine predators is essential to develop an understanding of their ecological role in ecosystems. Research conducted on deep-sea and threatened shark species is limited. Here, by combining analyses of individual stomach contents and stable isotope values, we examined the trophic ecology (dietary composition and trophic position) of the kitefin shark Dalatias licha, a deep-sea shark considered as near threatened globally and as data deficient in the Mediterranean Sea. Results revealed the importance of small sharks in the diet of the kitefin shark at short- and long-term scales, although fin-fish, crustaceans and cephalopods were also found. Predation on sharks reveals the high trophic position of the kitefin shark within the food web of the western Mediterranean Sea. Stable isotope values from liver and muscle tissues confirmed our results from stomach content analysis and the high trophic position.
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ISSN 0025-3162, 1432-1793 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 385
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Auteur Escalas, A.; Ferraton, F.; Paillon, C.; Vidy, G.; Carcaillet, F.; Salen-Picard, C.; Le Loc'h, F.; Richard, P.; Darnaude, A.M.
Titre Spatial variations in dietary organic matter sources modulate the size and condition of fish juveniles in temperate lagoon nursery sites Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci.
Volume (down) 152 Numéro Pages 78-90
Mots-Clés coastal lagoon; continental inputs; diet; fish; food webs; fresh-water flow; gilthead sea bream; isotope ratios; lagoon; marine nurseries; nursery; sole solea-solea; sparus-aurata; Stable isotopes; stable-isotopes; trophic ecology
Résumé Effective conservation of marine fish stocks involves understanding the impact, on population dynamics, of intra-specific variation in nursery habitats use at the juvenile stage. In some regions, an important part of the catching effort is concentrated on a small number of marine species that colonize coastal lagoons during their first year of life. To determine the intra-specific variation in lagoon use by these fish and their potential demographic consequences, we studied diet spatiotemporal variations in the group 0 juveniles of a highly exploited sparid, the gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L), during their similar to 6 months stay in a NW Mediterranean lagoon (N = 331, SL = 25-198 mm) and traced the origin of the organic matter in their food webs, at two lagoon sites with contrasted continental inputs. This showed that the origin (marine, lagoonal or continental) of the organic matter (OM) available in the water column and the sediment can vary substantially within the same lagoon, in line with local variations in the intensity of marine and continental inputs. The high trophic plasticity of S. aurata allows its juveniles to adapt to resulting differences in prey abundances at each site during their lagoon residency, thereby sustaining high growth irrespective of the area inhabited within the lagoon. However, continental POM incorporation by the juveniles through their diet (of 21-37% on average depending on the site) is proportional to its availability in the environment and could be responsible for the greater fish sizes (of 28 mm SL on average) and body weights (of 40.8 g on average) observed at the site under continental influence in the autumn, when the juveniles are ready to leave the lagoon. This suggests that continental inputs in particulate OM, when present, could significantly enhance fish growth within coastal lagoons, with important consequences on the local population dynamics of the fish species that use them as nurseries. As our results indicate that continental OM can represent up to 62% of the flesh of the juveniles originating from these ecosystems, particular care should be taken to preserve or improve the chemical quality of riverine inputs to coastal lagoons. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1192
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Auteur Bertrand, A.; Habasque, J.; Hattab, T.; Hintzen, N.T.; Oliveros-Ramos, R.; Gutierrez, M.; Demarcq, H.; Gerlotto, F.
Titre 3-D habitat suitability of jack mackerel Trachurus murphyi in the Southeastern Pacific, a comprehensive study Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Prog. Oceanogr.
Volume (down) 146 Numéro Pages 199-211
Mots-Clés anchovy; carangidae; chile; distribution models; distributions; dynamics; Ecology; ecosystem; peru; population-structure
Résumé South Pacific jack mackerel, Trachurus murphyi, has an ocean-scale distribution, from the South American coastline to New Zealand and Tasmania. This fish, captured by Humans since the Holocene, is nowadays heavily exploited and its population has decreased substantially since the mid-1990s. The uncertainty associated to jack mackerel population structure currently hampers management. Several hypotheses have been proposed from a single population up to several discrete populations. Still no.definitive answer was given. Determining how environmental conditions drive jack mackerel distribution can provide insights on its population structure. To do so, here we performed in three steps. First, we used satellite data to develop a statistical model of jack mackerel horizontal habitat suitability. Model predictions based on interaction between temperature and chlorophyll-a match the observed jack mackerel distribution, even during extreme El Nino event. Second, we studied the impact of oxygen and show that jack mackerel distribution and abundance is correlated to oxygen over a wide variety of scales and avoid low oxygen areas and periods. Third, on the basis of the above we built a conceptual 3D model of jack mackerel habitat in the Southeastern Pacific. We reveal the presence of a low suitable habitat along the Chilean and Peruvian coast, figuratively presenting a closed door caused by a gap in the horizontal habitat at 19-22 S and a shallow oxycline off south-centre Peru. This kind of situation likely occurs on a seasonal basis, in austral summer but also at longer temporal scales. A lack of exchanges at some periods/seasons partially isolate jack mackerel distributed off Peru. On the other hand the continuity in the habitat during most of the year explains why exchanges occur. We conclude that the more likely population structure for jack mackerel is a pelagic metapopulation. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0079-6611 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1639
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Auteur Duffy, L.M.; Kuhnert, P.; Pethybridge, H.R.; Young, J.W.; Olson, R.J.; Logan, J.M.; Goñi, N.; Romanov, E.; Allain, V.; Staudinger, M.; Abecassis, M.; Choy, C.A.; Hobday, A.J.; Simier, M.; Galván-Magaña, F.; Potier, M.; Ménard, F.
Titre Global trophic ecology of yellowfin, bigeye, and albacore tunas: understanding predation on micronekton communities at ocean-basin scales Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography
Volume (down) 140 Numéro Pages 55-73
Mots-Clés classification trees; climate changes; ecosystems; food webs; inter-ocean comparison; macroecology; Meta-analysis; trophic relationships
Résumé Predator-prey interactions for three commercially valuable tuna species: yellowfin (Thunnus albacares), bigeye (T. obesus), and albacore (T. alalunga), collected over a 40-year period from the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic Oceans, were used to quantitatively assess broad, macro-scale trophic patterns in pelagic ecosystems. Analysis of over 14,000 tuna stomachs, using a modified classification tree approach, revealed for the first time the global expanse of pelagic predatory fish diet and global patterns of micronekton diversity. Ommastrephid squids were consistently one of the top prey groups by weight across all tuna species and in most ocean bodies. Interspecific differences in prey were apparent, with epipelagic scombrid and mesopelagic paralepidid fishes globally important for yellowfin and bigeye tunas, respectively, while vertically-migrating euphausiid crustaceans were important for albacore tuna in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Diet diversity showed global and regional patterns among tuna species. In the central and western Pacific Ocean, characterized by low productivity, a high diversity of micronekton prey was consumed while low prey diversity was evident in highly productive coastal waters where upwelling occurs. Spatial patterns of diet diversity were most variable in yellowfin and bigeye tunas while a latitudinal diversity gradient was observed with lower diversity in temperate regions for albacore tuna. Sea-surface temperature was a reasonable predictor of the diets of yellowfin and bigeye tunas, whereas chlorophyll-a was the best environmental predictor of albacore diet. These results suggest that the ongoing expansion of warmer, less productive waters in the world’s oceans may alter foraging opportunities for tunas due to regional changes in prey abundances and compositions.
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Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2102
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Auteur Navarro, J.; Saez-Liante, R.; Albo-Puigserver, M.; Coll, M.; Palomera, I.
Titre Feeding strategies and ecological roles of three predatory pelagic fish in the western Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.
Volume (down) 140 Numéro Pages 9-17
Mots-Clés diet; ecosystem structure; iberian peninsula; indian-ocean; isotope ratios; Marine predators; Pelagic ecosystem; Stable isotopes; stable-isotopes; Stomach contents; swordfish; top predators; Trophic ecology; trophic level; xiphias-gladius; Yellowfin tuna
Résumé Knowing the feeding ecology of marine predators is pivotal to developing an understanding of their ecological role in the ecosystem and determining the trophic relationships between them. Despite the ecological importance of predatory pelagic fish species, research on these species in the Mediterranean Sea is limited. Here, by combining analyses of stomach contents and stable isotope values, we examined the feeding strategies of swordfish, Xiphias gladius, little tunny, Euthynnus alletteratus and Atlantic bonito, Sarda sarda, in the western Mediterranean Sea. We also compared the trophic niche and trophic level of these species with published information of other sympatric pelagic predators present in the ecosystem. Results indicated that, although the diet of the three species was composed mainly by fin-fish species, a clear segregation in their main feeding strategies was found. Swordfish showed a generalist diet including demersal species such as blue whiting, Micromesistius poutassou, and European hake, Merluccius merluccius, and pelagic fin-fish such as barracudina species (Arctozenus risso and Lestidiops jayakari) or small pelagic fish species. Little tunny and Atlantic bonito were segregated isotopically between them and showed a diet basically composed of anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus, and round sardinella, Sardinella aurita, and sardines, Sardina pilchardus, respectively. This trophic segregation, in addition to potential segregation by depth, is likely a mechanism that allows their potential coexistence within the same pelagic habitat. When the trophic position of these three predatory pelagic fish species is compared with other pelagic predators such as bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, and dolphinfish, Coryphaena hippurus, present in the western Mediterranean Sea, we found that they show similar intermediate trophic position in the ecosystem. In conclusion, the combined stomach and isotopic results highlight, especially for little tunny and Atlantic bonito, the trophic importance of Clupeoid species in their diet. In addition, the importance of demersal resources for swordfish provides evidence for the pelagic-demersal coupling of the ecosystem and the need to manage marine resources in an integrated way. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2175
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