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Auteur Mouquet, N.; Devictor, V.; Meynard, C.N.; Munoz, F.; Bersier, L.-F.; Chave, J.; Couteron, P.; Dalecky, A.; Fontaine, C.; Gravel, D.; Hardy, O.J.; Jabot, F.; Lavergne, S.; Leibold, M.; Mouillot, D.; Münkemüller, T.; Pavoine, S.; Prinzing, A.; Rodrigues, A.S.L.; Rohr, R.P.; Thébault, E.; Thuiller, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Ecophylogenetics: advances and perspectives Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Biological Reviews  
  Volume 87 Numéro 4 Pages 769-785  
  Mots-Clés community ecology; conservation biology; ecological networks; ecophylogenetics; Ecosystem functioning; evolution; phylogenetics  
  Résumé Ecophylogenetics can be viewed as an emerging fusion of ecology, biogeography and macroevolution. This new and fast-growing field is promoting the incorporation of evolution and historical contingencies into the ecological research agenda through the widespread use of phylogenetic data. Including phylogeny into ecological thinking represents an opportunity for biologists from different fields to collaborate and has provided promising avenues of research in both theoretical and empirical ecology, towards a better understanding of the assembly of communities, the functioning of ecosystems and their responses to environmental changes. The time is ripe to assess critically the extent to which the integration of phylogeny into these different fields of ecology has delivered on its promise. Here we review how phylogenetic information has been used to identify better the key components of species interactions with their biotic and abiotic environments, to determine the relationships between diversity and ecosystem functioning and ultimately to establish good management practices to protect overall biodiversity in the face of global change. We evaluate the relevance of information provided by phylogenies to ecologists, highlighting current potential weaknesses and needs for future developments. We suggest that despite the strong progress that has been made, a consistent unified framework is still missing to link local ecological dynamics to macroevolution. This is a necessary step in order to interpret observed phylogenetic patterns in a wider ecological context. Beyond the fundamental question of how evolutionary history contributes to shape communities, ecophylogenetics will help ecology to become a better integrative and predictive science.  
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  ISSN 1469-185x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 556  
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Auteur Toussaint, A.; Beauchard, O.; Oberdorff, T.; Brosse, S.; Villeger, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Historical assemblage distinctiveness and the introduction of widespread non-native species explain worldwide changes in freshwater fish taxonomic dissimilarity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography  
  Volume 23 Numéro 5 Pages 574-584  
  Mots-Clés Beta diversity; differentiation; freshwater fish; homogenization; macroecology; partitioning; turnover  
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  ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1174  
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Auteur Thiebault, A.; Tremblay, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Splitting animal trajectories into fine-scale behaviorally consistent movement units: breaking points relate to external stimuli in a foraging seabird Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Behav Ecol Sociobiol  
  Volume 67 Numéro 6 Pages 1013-1026  
  Mots-Clés Animal behavior; Biologging; Gps; Movement ecology; Segmentation  
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  ISSN 0340-5443 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 263  
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Auteur REYGONDEAU, G.; MAURY, O.; BEAUGRAND, G.; FROMENTIN, J.-M.; FONTENEAU, A.; CURY, P. url  openurl
  Titre Biogeography of tuna and billfish communities Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Journal Of Biogeography Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 39 Numéro 1 Pages 114-129  
  Mots-Clés Biogeochemical provinces; global ocean; Istiophorus; Katsuwonus; macroecology; Makaira; marine biogeography; Tetrapturus; Thunnus; Xiphias  
  Résumé Aim The aims of this study were: (1) to identify global communities of tuna and billfish species through quantitative statistical analyses of global fisheries data; (2) to describe the spatial distribution, main environmental drivers and species composition of each community detected; and (3) to determine whether the spatial distribution of each community could be linked to the environmental conditions that affect lower trophic levels by comparing the partitions identified in this study with Longhursts biogeochemical provinces. Location The global ocean from 60 degrees S to 65 degrees N. Methods We implemented a new numerical procedure based on a hierarchical clustering method and a nonparametric probabilistic test to divide the oceanic biosphere into biomes and ecoregions. This procedure was applied to a database that comprised standardized data on commercial longline catches for 15 different species of tuna and billfish over a period of more than 50 years (i.e. 1953-2007). For each ecoregion identified (i.e. characteristic tuna and billfish community), we analysed the relationships between species composition and environmental factors. Finally, we compared the biogeochemical provinces of Longhurst with the ecoregions that we identified. Results Tuna and billfish species form nine well-defined communities across the global ocean. Each community occurs in regions with specific environmental conditions and shows a distinctive species composition. High similarity (68.8% homogeneity) between the spatial distribution of the communities of tuna and billfish and the biogeochemical provinces suggests a strong relationship between these species and the physical and chemical characteristics of the global ocean. Main conclusions Despite their high tolerance for a wide range of environmental conditions, these highly migratory species are partitioned into clear geographical communities in the ocean at a global scale. The similarity between biogeochemical and biotic divisions in the ocean suggests that the global ocean is a mosaic of large biogeographical ecosystems, each characterized by specific environmental conditions that have a strong effect on the composition of the trophic web.  
  Adresse IFREMER, Ctr Rech Halieut Mediterraneennes & Trop, UMR EME 212, F-34203 Sete, France.  
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  Editeur Wiley-blackwell Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
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  ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ 17141 collection 1002  
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Auteur Wang, T.; Lefevre, S.; Iversen, N.K.; Findorf, I.; Buchanan, R.; McKenzie, D.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Anaemia only causes a small reduction in the upper critical temperature of sea bass: is oxygen delivery the limiting factor for tolerance of acute warming in fishes? Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Experimental Biology  
  Volume 217 Numéro 24 Pages 4275-4278  
  Mots-Clés aerobic scope; cardiac-performance; Cardiovascular; climate-change; dicentrarchus-labrax; ecology; exp. biol. 216; fish; Haematocrit; metabolism; Oxygen transport; phenylhydrazine-induced anemia; thermal tolerance; trout  
  Résumé To address how the capacity for oxygen transport influences tolerance of acute warming in fishes, we investigated whether a reduction in haematocrit, by means of intra-peritoneal injection of the haemolytic agent phenylhydrazine, lowered the upper critical temperature of sea bass. A reduction in haematocrit from 42 +/- 2% to 20 +/- 3% (mean +/- s.e.m.) caused a significant but minor reduction in upper critical temperature, from 35.8 +/- 0.1 to 35.1 +/- 0.2 degrees C, with no correlation between individual values for haematocrit and upper thermal limit. Anaemia did not influence the rise in oxygen uptake between 25 and 33 degrees C, because the anaemic fish were able to compensate for reduced blood oxygen carrying capacity with a significant increase in cardiac output. Therefore, in sea bass the upper critical temperature, at which they lost equilibrium, was not determined by an inability of the cardio-respiratory system to meet the thermal acceleration of metabolic demands.  
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  ISSN 0022-0949 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes <p>ISI Document Delivery No.: AW7BT<br/>Times Cited: 1<br/>Cited Reference Count: 44<br/>Wang, Tobias Lefevre, Sjannie Iversen, Nina K. Findorf, Inge Buchanan, Rasmus McKenzie, David J.<br/>Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS); Danish Research Council; Region Languedoc-Roussillon (RLR); Ambassade de France in Copenhagen; Universite Montpellier 2<br/>This research was supported by the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), the Danish Research Council, The Ambassade de France in Copenhagen and Universite Montpellier 2. T.W. was supported by a fellowship from Region Languedoc-Roussillon (RLR) as a visiting professor at Universite Montpellier 2. I.F. and N.K.I. were supported by a student grant from The Ambassade de France in Copenhagen.<br/>Company of biologists ltd<br/>Cambridge</p> Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1181  
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