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Auteur Bodin, N.; Chassot, E.; Sardenne, F.; Zudaire, I.; Grande, M.; Dhurmeea, Z.; Murua, H.; Barde, J.
Titre (up) Ecological data for western Indian Ocean tuna Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology
Volume 99 Numéro 5 Pages 1245-1245
Mots-Clés energetics; fatty acids; lipids; morphometrics; multi-tissues; proteins; stable isotopes; trophic ecology; tropical marine ecosystems; tuna fisheries
Résumé Tuna are marine apex predators that inhabit the tropical and sub-tropical waters of the Indian Ocean where they support socially and economically important fisheries. Key component of pelagic communities, tuna are bioindicator species of anthropogenic and climate-induced changes through modifications of the structure and related energy-flow of food webs and ecosystems. The IndianEcoTuna dataset provides a panel of ecological tracers measured in four soft tissues (white muscle, red muscle, liver, gonads) from 1,364 individuals of four species, i.e., the albacore (ALB, Thunnus alalunga), the bigeye (BET, T. obesus), the skipjack (SKJ, Katsuwomus pelamis), and the yellowfin (YFT, T. albacares), collected throughout the western Indian Ocean from 2009 to 2015. Sampling was carried out during routine monitoring programs, at sea by observers onboard professional vessels or at landing. For each record, the type of fishing gear, the conservation mode, as well as the fishing date and catch location are provided. Individuals were sampled to span a wide range of body sizes: 565 ALB with fork length from 58 to 118 cm, 155 BET from 29.5 to 173 cm, 304 SKJ from 30 to 74 cm, and 340 YFT from 29 to 171.5 cm. The IndianEcoTuna dataset combines: (1) 9,512 records of carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes (percent element weights, δ13C and δ15N values) in 1,185 fish, (2) 887 concentrations of total proteins in 242 fish, (3) 8,356 concentrations of total lipids and three lipid classes (triacylglycerols TAG; phospholipids PL; sterols ST) in 695 fish, and (4) 1,150 and 1,033 profiles of neutral and polar fatty acids in 397 and 342 fish, respectively. Information on sex and weights of the whole fish, gonads, liver and stomach is provided. Because of the essential trophic role and wide-ranging of tuna in marine systems, and the large panel of tropho-energetic tracers and derived-key quantitative parameters provided (e.g., niche width, trophic position, condition indices), the IndianEcoTuna dataset should be of high interest for global and regional research on marine trophic ecology and food web analysis, as well as on the impacts of anthropogenic changes on Indian Ocean marine ecosystems. There are no copyright restrictions for research and/or teaching purposes. Usage of the dataset must include citation of this Data Paper.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1939-9170 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2373
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Auteur Mouquet, N.; Devictor, V.; Meynard, C.N.; Munoz, F.; Bersier, L.-F.; Chave, J.; Couteron, P.; Dalecky, A.; Fontaine, C.; Gravel, D.; Hardy, O.J.; Jabot, F.; Lavergne, S.; Leibold, M.; Mouillot, D.; Münkemüller, T.; Pavoine, S.; Prinzing, A.; Rodrigues, A.S.L.; Rohr, R.P.; Thébault, E.; Thuiller, W.
Titre (up) Ecophylogenetics: advances and perspectives Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Biological Reviews
Volume 87 Numéro 4 Pages 769-785
Mots-Clés community ecology; conservation biology; ecological networks; ecophylogenetics; Ecosystem functioning; evolution; phylogenetics
Résumé Ecophylogenetics can be viewed as an emerging fusion of ecology, biogeography and macroevolution. This new and fast-growing field is promoting the incorporation of evolution and historical contingencies into the ecological research agenda through the widespread use of phylogenetic data. Including phylogeny into ecological thinking represents an opportunity for biologists from different fields to collaborate and has provided promising avenues of research in both theoretical and empirical ecology, towards a better understanding of the assembly of communities, the functioning of ecosystems and their responses to environmental changes. The time is ripe to assess critically the extent to which the integration of phylogeny into these different fields of ecology has delivered on its promise. Here we review how phylogenetic information has been used to identify better the key components of species interactions with their biotic and abiotic environments, to determine the relationships between diversity and ecosystem functioning and ultimately to establish good management practices to protect overall biodiversity in the face of global change. We evaluate the relevance of information provided by phylogenies to ecologists, highlighting current potential weaknesses and needs for future developments. We suggest that despite the strong progress that has been made, a consistent unified framework is still missing to link local ecological dynamics to macroevolution. This is a necessary step in order to interpret observed phylogenetic patterns in a wider ecological context. Beyond the fundamental question of how evolutionary history contributes to shape communities, ecophylogenetics will help ecology to become a better integrative and predictive science.
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Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1469-185x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 556
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Auteur Cruaud, P.; Decker, C.; Olu, K.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Papot, C.; Le Baut, J.; Vigneron, A.; Khripounoff, A.; Gayet, N.; Cathalot, C.; Caprais, J.-C.; Pignet, P.; Godfroy, A.; Cambon-Bonavita, M.-A.
Titre (up) Ecophysiological differences between vesicomyid species and metabolic capabilities of their symbionts influence distribution patterns of the deep-sea clams Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Evol. Persp.
Volume 40 Numéro 3 Pages e12541
Mots-Clés calyptogena-magnifica; chemoautotrophic bacteria; cold seeps; community structure; deep-sea ecosystems; evolutionary relationships; guaymas basin; Guaymas Basin; gulf-of-california; hydrothermal vent clam; macrofaunal communities; marine ecology; pliocardinae bivalve; sulfide-rich sediments; sulfur storage; vesicomyid movements
Résumé This study provides an analysis of vesicomyid bivalve-symbiont community distribution across cold seep and hydrothermal vent areas in the Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico). Using a combination of morphological and molecular approaches including fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and electronic microscopy observations, vesicomyid clam species and their associated symbionts were characterized and results were analyzed in light of geochemical conditions and other on-site observations. A greater diversity of vesicomyids was found at cold seep areas, where three different species were present (Phreagena soyoae [syn. kilmeri], Archivesica gigas, and Calyptogena pacifica). In contrast, A. gigas was the only species sampled across the hydrothermal vent area. The same haplotype of A. gigas was found in both hydrothermal vent and cold seep areas, highlighting possible contemporary exchanges among neighboring vents and seeps. In either ecosystem, molecular characterization of the symbionts confirmed the specificity between symbionts and hosts and supported the hypothesis of a predominantly vertical transmission. In addition, patterns of clams could reflect potential niche preferences for each species. The occurrence of numerous traces of vesicomyid movements on sediments in the sites colonized by A. gigas seemed to indicate that this species might have a better ability to move. Furthermore, variation in gill sulfur content could reveal a higher plasticity and sulfur storage capacity in A. gigas. Thus, the distribution of vesicomyid species across the chemosynthetic areas of the Guaymas Basin could be explained by differences in biological traits of the vesicomyid species that would allow A. gigas to more easily exploit transient and punctual sources of available sulfide than P. soyoae.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0173-9565 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000472949800006 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2605
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Auteur Soissons, L.M.; van Katwijk, M.M.; Li, B.; Han, Q.; Ysebaert, T.; Herman, P.M.J.; Bouma, T.J.
Titre (up) Ecosystem engineering creates a new path to resilience in plants with contrasting growth strategies Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Oecologia
Volume 191 Numéro 4 Pages 1015-1024
Mots-Clés competition; dynamics; ecology; eelgrass zostera-marina; exposure; indicators; organisms; Recovery from disturbance; Resistance to stress; Seagrass; seagrass beds; sediment-nutrient; stiffness; Sulphide intrusion
Résumé Plant species can be characterized by different growth strategies related to their inherent growth and recovery rates, which shape their responses to stress and disturbance. Ecosystem engineering, however, offers an alternative way to cope with stress: modifying the environment may reduce stress levels. Using an experimental study on two seagrass species with contrasting traits, the slow-growing Zostera marina vs. the fast-growing Zostera japonica, we explored how growth strategies versus ecosystem engineering may affect their resistance to stress (i.e. addition of organic material) and recovery from disturbance (i.e. removal of above-ground biomass). Ecosystem engineering was assessed by measuring sulphide levels in the sediment porewater, as seagrass plants can keep sulphide levels low by aerating the rhizosphere. Consistent with predictions, we observed that the fast-growing species had a high capacity to recover from disturbance. It was also more resistant to stress and still able to maintain high standing stock with increasing stress levels because of its ecosystem engineering capacity. The slow-growing species was not able to maintain its standing stock under stress, which we ascribe to a weak capacity for ecosystem engineering regarding this particular stress. Overall, our study suggests that the combination of low-cost investment in tissues with ecosystem engineering to alleviate stress creates a new path in the growth trade-off between investment in strong tissues or fast growth. It does so by being both fast in recovery and more resistant. As such low-cost ecosystem engineering may occur in more species, we argue that it should be considered in assessing plant resilience.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000496412400025 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2659
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Auteur KIVELA, M.; ARNAUD-HAOND, S.; SARAMAKI, J.
Titre (up) EDENetworks: A user-friendly software to build and analyse networks in biogeography, ecology and population genetics Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Molecular Ecology Resources
Volume 15 Numéro 1 Pages 117-122
Mots-Clés Biogeography; biological communities; graph theory; microbial ecology; network analysis; population genetics
Résumé The recent application of graph-based network theory analysis to biogeography, community ecology and population genetics has created a need for user-friendly software, which would allow a wider accessibility to and adaptation of these methods. EDENetworks aims to fill this void by providing an easy-to-use interface for the whole analysis pipeline of ecological and evolutionary networks starting from matrices of species distributions, genotypes, bacterial OTUs or populations characterized genetically. The user can choose between several different ecological distance metrics, such as Bray-Curtis or Sorensen distance, or population genetic metrics such as FST or Goldstein distances, to turn the raw data into a distance/dissimilarity matrix. This matrix is then transformed into a network by manual or automatic thresholding based on percolation theory or by building the minimum spanning tree. The networks can be visualized along with auxiliary data and analysed with various metrics such as degree, clustering coefficient, assortativity and betweenness centrality. The statistical significance of the results can be estimated either by resampling the original biological data or by null models based on permutations of the data.
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ISSN 1755-098x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1119
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