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Auteur Parravicini, V.; Villeger, S.; McClanahan, T.R.; Arias-Gonzalez, J.E.; Bellwood, D.R.; Belmaker, J.; Chabanet, P.; Floeter, S.R.; Friedlander, A.M.; Guilhaumon, F.; Vigliola, L.; Kulbicki, M.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Global mismatch between species richness and vulnerability of reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Ecology Letters
Volume 17 Numéro 9 Pages 1101-1110
Mots-Clés Vulnerability; biodiversity; biodiversity loss; conservation; coral-reefs; extinction; fisheries; functional diversity; hotspots; macroecology; marine; patterns; protected areas; risk assessment; sensitivity
Résumé The impact of anthropogenic activity on ecosystems has highlighted the need to move beyond the biogeographical delineation of species richness patterns to understanding the vulnerability of species assemblages, including the functional components that are linked to the processes they support. We developed a decision theory framework to quantitatively assess the global taxonomic and functional vulnerability of fish assemblages on tropical reefs using a combination of sensitivity to species loss, exposure to threats and extent of protection. Fish assemblages with high taxonomic and functional sensitivity are often exposed to threats but are largely missed by the global network of marine protected areas. We found that areas of high species richness spatially mismatch areas of high taxonomic and functional vulnerability. Nevertheless, there is strong spatial match between taxonomic and functional vulnerabilities suggesting a potential win-win conservation-ecosystem service strategy if more protection is set in these locations.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 630
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Auteur Toussaint, A.; Charpin, N.; Beauchard, O.; Grenouillet, G.; Oberdorff, T.; Tedesco, P.A.; Brosse, S.; Villeger, S.
Titre Non-native species led to marked shifts in functional diversity of the world freshwater fish faunas Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Ecol. Lett.
Volume 21 Numéro 11 Pages 1649-1659
Mots-Clés assemblages; biodiversity; Biotic exchanges; communities; extinction; extirpations; functional richness; functional divergence; homogenization; hydropower; introduction; invasion; islands; macroecology; patterns; richness
Résumé Global spread of non-native species profoundly changed the world biodiversity patterns, but how it translates into functional changes remains unanswered at the world scale. We here show that while in two centuries the number of fish species per river increased on average by 15% in 1569 basins worldwide, the diversity of their functional attributes (i.e. functional richness) increased on average by 150%. The inflation of functional richness was paired with changes in the functional structure of assemblages, with shifts of species position toward the border of the functional space of assemblages (i.e. increased functional divergence). Non-native species moreover caused shifts in functional identity toward higher body sized and less elongated species for most of assemblages throughout the world. Although varying between rivers and biogeographic realms, such changes in the different facets of functional diversity might still increase in the future through increasing species invasion and may further modify ecosystem functioning.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2425
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Auteur Sirot, C.; Gronkjaer, P.; Pedersen, J.B.; Panfili, J.; Zetina-Rejon, M.; Tripp-Valdez, A.; Ramos-Miranda, J.; Flores-Hernandez, D.; Sosa-Lopez, A.; Darnaude, A.M.
Titre Using otolith organic matter to detect diet shifts in Bardiella chrysoura, during a period of environmental changes Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.
Volume 575 Numéro Pages 137-152
Mots-Clés aquatic ecosystems; Bairdiella chrysoura; climate-change; Coastal ecosystem; fish otoliths; food-web; movement patterns; prey availability; Stable isotope analysis; stable-isotope analysis; survival; temporal-changes; terminos lagoon; Trophic ecology; Trophic interactions
Résumé Accurate knowledge on fish trophic ecology and its modifications is crucial for understanding the impact of global change on ecosystems. In this context, we investigated the value of the delta C-13 and delta N-15 of otolith soluble organic matter (SOM) for identifying temporal diet shifts in American silver perch Bairdiella chrysoura over a 30-yr period characterized by strong changes in its population size and habitats within the Terminos Lagoon (Mexico). We first compared the otolith SOM isotopic signatures from present-clay adults to those of muscle and the main local prey. Our results suggest that otolith SOM can be confidently extracted and analyzed for both present and past otoliths of this species. The mean otolith SOM signatures obtained (-15.92 +/- 1.35%, for delta C-13 and 9.38 +/- 0.93%, for delta N-15) were consistent with those of the diet as 85% of the individual signatures were included within the prey isotopic niche area. Moreover, this study supports a trophic enrichment factor between diet and otolith (TEFdiet-otolith) close to 0 for delta N-15, while for delta C-13, the TEFololith-muscle of +0.02% warrants further investigation. Then, we compared past and contemporary otolith SOM signatures to investigate temporal diet shifts in B. chrysoura. This showed that 613C and delta N-15 differed significantly between the past and present period even if the temporal shift remained relatively small (respectively +1.17%, and 0.55%). The present study substantiates the use of otolith SOM delta C-13 and delta N-15 as a proxy of fish present and past trophic position, opening the possibility for major progress in studies of temporal changes in food web ecology.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2172
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Auteur Cox, S.L.; Embling, C.B.; Hosegood, P.J.; Votier, S.C.; Ingram, S.N.
Titre Oceanographic drivers of marine mammal and seabird habitat-use across shelf-seas: A guide to key features and recommendations for future research and conservation management Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci.
Volume 212 Numéro Pages 294-310
Mots-Clés Bio-physical coupling; bottle-nosed dolphins; california current system; coastal upwelling system; Conservation management; ecosystem-based management; Foraging ecology; Habitat selection; Marine mammals; Oceanography; porpoise phocoena-phocoena; predator-prey interactions; Seabirds; southeastern bering-sea; st-george island; thin zooplankton layers; tidal-stream environments
Résumé Mid-latitude (similar to 30-60 degrees) seasonally stratifying shelf-seas support a high abundance and diversity of marine predators such as marine mammals and seabirds. However, anthropogenic activities and climate change impacts are driving changes in the distributions and population dynamics of these animals, with negative consequences for ecosystem functioning. Across mid-latitude shelf-seas marine mammals and seabirds are known to forage across a number of oceanographic habitats that structure the spatio-temporal distributions of prey fields. Knowledge of these and the bio-physical mechanisms driving such associations are needed to improve marine management and policy. Here, we provide a concise and easily accessible guide for both researchers and managers of marine systems on the predominant oceanographic habitats that are favoured for foraging by marine mammals and seabirds across mid-latitude shelf-seas. We (1) identify and describe key discrete physical features present across the continental shelf, working inshore from the shelf-edge to the shore line, (2) provide an overview of findings relating to associations between these habitats and marine mammals and seabirds, (3) identify areas for future research and (4) discuss the relevance of such information to conservation management. We show that oceanographic features preferentially foraged at by marine mammals and seabirds include shelf edge fronts, upwelling and tidal-mixing fronts, offshore banks and internal waves, regions of stratification, and topographically complex coastal areas subject to strong tidal flow. Whilst associations were variable across taxa and through space and time, in the majority of cases interactions between bathymetry and tidal currents appear to play a dominant role, alongside patterns in seasonal stratification and shelf-edge upwelling. We suggest that the ecological significance of these bio-physical structures stems from a capacity to alter the densities, distributions (both horizontally and vertically) and/or behaviours of prey in a persistent and/or predictable manner that increases accessibility for predators, and likely enhances foraging efficiency. Future conservation management should aim to preserve and protect these habitats. This will require adaptive and holistic strategies that are specifically tailored to the characteristics of an oceanographic feature, and where necessary, evolve through space and time in response to spatio-temporal variability. Improved monitoring of animal movements and biophysical conditions across shelf-seas would aid in this. Areas for future research include multi-disciplinary/ trophic studies of the mechanisms linking bio-physical processes, prey and marine mammals and seabirds (which may elucidate the importance of lesser studied features such as bottom fronts and Langmuir circulation cells), alongside a better understanding of how predators perceive their environment and develop foraging strategies during immature/juvenile stages. Estimates of the importance of oceanographic habitat features at a population level should also be obtained. Such information is vital to ensuring the future health of these complex ecosystems, and can be used to assess how anthropogenic activities and future environmental changes will impact the functioning and spatio-temporal dynamics of these bio-physical features and their use by marine predators.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2428
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Auteur Navarro, J.; Saez-Liante, R.; Albo-Puigserver, M.; Coll, M.; Palomera, I.
Titre Feeding strategies and ecological roles of three predatory pelagic fish in the western Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.
Volume 140 Numéro Pages 9-17
Mots-Clés diet; ecosystem structure; iberian peninsula; indian-ocean; isotope ratios; Marine predators; Pelagic ecosystem; Stable isotopes; stable-isotopes; Stomach contents; swordfish; top predators; Trophic ecology; trophic level; xiphias-gladius; Yellowfin tuna
Résumé Knowing the feeding ecology of marine predators is pivotal to developing an understanding of their ecological role in the ecosystem and determining the trophic relationships between them. Despite the ecological importance of predatory pelagic fish species, research on these species in the Mediterranean Sea is limited. Here, by combining analyses of stomach contents and stable isotope values, we examined the feeding strategies of swordfish, Xiphias gladius, little tunny, Euthynnus alletteratus and Atlantic bonito, Sarda sarda, in the western Mediterranean Sea. We also compared the trophic niche and trophic level of these species with published information of other sympatric pelagic predators present in the ecosystem. Results indicated that, although the diet of the three species was composed mainly by fin-fish species, a clear segregation in their main feeding strategies was found. Swordfish showed a generalist diet including demersal species such as blue whiting, Micromesistius poutassou, and European hake, Merluccius merluccius, and pelagic fin-fish such as barracudina species (Arctozenus risso and Lestidiops jayakari) or small pelagic fish species. Little tunny and Atlantic bonito were segregated isotopically between them and showed a diet basically composed of anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus, and round sardinella, Sardinella aurita, and sardines, Sardina pilchardus, respectively. This trophic segregation, in addition to potential segregation by depth, is likely a mechanism that allows their potential coexistence within the same pelagic habitat. When the trophic position of these three predatory pelagic fish species is compared with other pelagic predators such as bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, and dolphinfish, Coryphaena hippurus, present in the western Mediterranean Sea, we found that they show similar intermediate trophic position in the ecosystem. In conclusion, the combined stomach and isotopic results highlight, especially for little tunny and Atlantic bonito, the trophic importance of Clupeoid species in their diet. In addition, the importance of demersal resources for swordfish provides evidence for the pelagic-demersal coupling of the ecosystem and the need to manage marine resources in an integrated way. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2175
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