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Auteur Fournier, B.; Mouquet, N.; Leibold, M.A.; Gravel, D.
Titre An integrative framework of coexistence mechanisms in competitive metacommunities Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Ecography
Volume 40 Numéro 5 Pages 630-641
Mots-Clés assembly processes; biodiversity; community ecology; dispersal; metapopulation dynamics; neutral metacommunities; niche; recruitment limitation; Restoration; species-diversity
Résumé Species distribution in a metacommunity varies according to their traits, the distribution of environmental conditions and connectivity among localities. These ingredients contribute to coexistence across spatial scales via species sorting, patch dynamics, mass effects and neutral dynamics. These mechanisms however seldom act in isolation and the impact of landscape configuration on their relative importance remains poorly understood. We present a new model of metacommunity dynamics that simultaneously considers these four possible mechanisms over spatially explicit landscapes and propose a statistical approach to partition their contribution to species distribution. We find that landscape configuration can induce dispersal limitations that have negative consequences for local species richness. This result was more pronounced with neutral dynamics and mass effect than with species sorting or patch dynamics. We also find that the relative importance of the four mechanisms varies not only among landscape configurations, but also among species, with some species being mostly constrained by dispersal and/or drift and others by sorting. Changes in landscape properties might lead to a shift in coexistence mechanisms and, by extension, to a change in community composition. This confirms the importance of considering landscape properties for conservation and management. Our results illustrate the idea that ecological communities are the results of multiple mechanisms acting at the same time and complete our understanding of spatial processes in competitive metacommunities.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2141
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Auteur Lett, C.; Semeria, M.; Thiebault, A.; Tremblay, Y.
Titre Effects of successive predator attacks on prey aggregations Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Theor Ecol
Volume 7 Numéro 3 Pages 239-252
Mots-Clés Animal aggregation; Animal group; Attraction-repulsion model; Flock; Plant Sciences; School; Swarm; Theoretical Ecology/Statistics; Zoology
Résumé We study the cumulative effect of successive predator attacks on the disturbance of a prey aggregation using a modelling approach. Our model intends to represent fish schools attacked by both aerial and underwater predators. This individual-based model uses long-distance attraction and short-distance repulsion between prey, which leads to prey aggregation and swarming in the absence of predators. When intermediate-distance alignment is added to the model, the prey aggregation displays a cohesive displacement, i.e., schooling, instead of swarming. Including predators, i.e. with repulsion behaviour for prey to predators in the model, leads to flash expansion of the prey aggregation after a predator attack. When several predators attack successively, the prey aggregation dynamics is a succession of expanding-grouping-swarming/schooling phases. We quantify this dynamics by recording the changes in the simulated prey aggregation radius over time. This radius is computed as the longest distance of individual prey to the aggregation centroid, and it is assumed to increase along with prey disturbance. The prey aggregation radius generally increases during flash expansion, then decreases during grouping until reaching a constant lowest level during swarming/schooling. This general dynamics is modulated by several parameters: the frequency, direction (vertical vs. horizontal) and target (centroid of the prey aggregation vs. random prey) of predator attacks; the distance at which prey detect predators; the number of prey and predators. Our results suggest that both aerial and underwater predators are more efficient at disturbing fish schools by increasing their attack frequency at such level that the fish cannot return to swarming/schooling. We find that a mix between aerial and underwater predators is more efficient at disturbing a fish school than a single type of attack, suggesting that aerial and underwater foragers may gain mutual benefits in forming foraging groups.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1874-1738, 1874-1746 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 350
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Auteur Leprieur, F.; Colosio, S.; Descombes, P.; Parravicini, V.; Kulbicki, M.; Cowman, P.F.; Bellwood, D.R.; Mouillot, D.; Pellissier, L.
Titre Historical and contemporary determinants of global phylogenetic structure in tropical reef fish faunas Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Ecography
Volume 39 Numéro 9 Pages 825-835
Mots-Clés biodiversity hotspots; climate-change; community ecology; coral-reefs; damselfishes teleostei; evolutionary origins; genetic-structure; indo-pacific; latitudinal diversity gradient; species richness
Résumé Identifying the main determinants of tropical marine biodiversity is essential for devising appropriate conservation measures mitigating the ongoing degradation of coral reef habitats. Based on a gridded distribution database and phylogenetic information, we compared the phylogenetic structure of assemblages for three tropical reef fish families (Labridae: wrasses, Pomacentridae: damselfishes and Chaetodontidae: butterflyfishes) using the net relatedness (NRI) and nearest taxon (NTI) indices. We then related these indices to contemporary and historical environmental conditions of coral reefs using spatial regression analyses. Higher levels of phylogenetic clustering were found for fish assemblages in the Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA), and more particularly when considering the NTI index. The phylogenetic structure of the Pomacentridae, and to a lower extent of the Chaeotodontidae and Labridae, was primarily associated with the location of refugia during the Quaternary period. Phylogenetic clustering in the IAA may partly result from vicariance events associated with coral reef fragmentation during the glacial periods of the Quaternary. Variation in the patterns among fish families further suggest that dispersal abilities may have interacted with past habitat availability in shaping the phylogenetic structure of tropical reef fish assemblages.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1633
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Auteur Boyd, C.; Punt, A.E.; Weimerskirch, H.; Bertrand, S.
Titre Movement models provide insights into variation in the foraging effort of central place foragers Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Ecological Modelling
Volume 286 Numéro Pages 13-25
Mots-Clés Animal movement; Foraging ecology; Hidden Markov model; Provisioning theory; Seabirds; Sula variegata
Résumé Ecology and conservation depend on an understanding of how animals adjust their behaviour patterns in response to changes in their environment. Central place foragers (CPFs) are well-suited for developing ecological models of adaptive processes because their objective functions and operational constraints can be reasonably inferred. Central place foraging and provisioning theory provide the theoretical framework for this analysis. Analysis of CPF time allocation and energy budgets can provide insights into their strategies for responding to environmental variation. However, until recently, suitable high-resolution data on the behaviour of seabirds and other CPFs at sea have not been available. Previous studies of breeding seabirds have investigated variation in foraging trip duration and colony attendance, but few studies have analyzed variation in time allocation within foraging trips. Here, we develop a conceptual energy-based model for analysing variation in the time allocation of CPFs during foraging trips, and apply it to the movement patterns of Peruvian boobies (Sula variegata). Foraging trips of Peruvian boobies, recorded using high-resolution global positioning systems (GPS), were first partitioned into movement modes consistent with travel and foraging behaviours using a hidden Markov model (HMM) adapted to account for gaps in the GPS tracks associated with diving behaviour. Analysis of the HMM results based on the conceptual model indicated that differences in foraging effort between two treatments were best explained by a combination of differences in travel time and in time spent searching for prey. The conceptual model provides the basis for an integrated approach to analysis of variation in foraging strategies in which identification of various behaviours is coupled with assessments of time and energy budgets. This integrated approach can contribute to greater understanding of the processes determining foraging strategies and the limits to these strategies in the context of competition for resources and global climate change.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0304-3800 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 355
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Auteur Espinoza, P.; Bertrand, A.
Titre Ontogenetic and spatiotemporal variability in anchoveta Engraulis ringens diet off Peru Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication (up) Revue Abrégée Journal of Fish Biology
Volume 84 Numéro 2 Pages 422-435
Mots-Clés euphausiids; Humboldt Current system; oxygen; Peruvian anchovy; spatiotemporal variability; trophic ecology
Résumé In this study, historical data available since 1954 were used to get new insight to ontogenetic and spatiotemporal variability in Peruvian anchovy or anchoveta Engraulis ringens diet. Whatever the period, E. ringens foraged mainly on macrozooplankton and the importance of euphausiids in E. ringens diet appears directly related to euphausiids abundance. This bottom-up effect is also observed at smaller scale because the euphausiids fraction increased with E. ringens total length and euphausiids accessibility. Selecting the largest prey, the euphausiids, provides an energetic advantage for E. ringens in its ecosystem where oxygen depletion imposes strong metabolic constraints on pelagic fishes. This study illustrates the plasticity of E. ringens that allows it to cope with its highly variable environment.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-1112 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 358
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