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Auteur Duffy, L.M.; Kuhnert, P.; Pethybridge, H.R.; Young, J.W.; Olson, R.J.; Logan, J.M.; Goñi, N.; Romanov, E.; Allain, V.; Staudinger, M.; Abecassis, M.; Choy, C.A.; Hobday, A.J.; Simier, M.; Galván-Magaña, F.; Potier, M.; Ménard, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Global trophic ecology of yellowfin, bigeye, and albacore tunas: understanding predation on micronekton communities at ocean-basin scales Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography  
  Volume 140 Numéro Pages 55-73  
  Mots-Clés classification trees; climate changes; ecosystems; food webs; inter-ocean comparison; macroecology; Meta-analysis; trophic relationships  
  Résumé Predator-prey interactions for three commercially valuable tuna species: yellowfin (Thunnus albacares), bigeye (T. obesus), and albacore (T. alalunga), collected over a 40-year period from the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic Oceans, were used to quantitatively assess broad, macro-scale trophic patterns in pelagic ecosystems. Analysis of over 14,000 tuna stomachs, using a modified classification tree approach, revealed for the first time the global expanse of pelagic predatory fish diet and global patterns of micronekton diversity. Ommastrephid squids were consistently one of the top prey groups by weight across all tuna species and in most ocean bodies. Interspecific differences in prey were apparent, with epipelagic scombrid and mesopelagic paralepidid fishes globally important for yellowfin and bigeye tunas, respectively, while vertically-migrating euphausiid crustaceans were important for albacore tuna in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Diet diversity showed global and regional patterns among tuna species. In the central and western Pacific Ocean, characterized by low productivity, a high diversity of micronekton prey was consumed while low prey diversity was evident in highly productive coastal waters where upwelling occurs. Spatial patterns of diet diversity were most variable in yellowfin and bigeye tunas while a latitudinal diversity gradient was observed with lower diversity in temperate regions for albacore tuna. Sea-surface temperature was a reasonable predictor of the diets of yellowfin and bigeye tunas, whereas chlorophyll-a was the best environmental predictor of albacore diet. These results suggest that the ongoing expansion of warmer, less productive waters in the world’s oceans may alter foraging opportunities for tunas due to regional changes in prey abundances and compositions.  
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  Langue (up) Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2102  
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Auteur KIVELA, M.; ARNAUD-HAOND, S.; SARAMAKI, J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre EDENetworks: A user-friendly software to build and analyse networks in biogeography, ecology and population genetics Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Molecular Ecology Resources  
  Volume 15 Numéro 1 Pages 117-122  
  Mots-Clés Biogeography; biological communities; graph theory; microbial ecology; network analysis; population genetics  
  Résumé The recent application of graph-based network theory analysis to biogeography, community ecology and population genetics has created a need for user-friendly software, which would allow a wider accessibility to and adaptation of these methods. EDENetworks aims to fill this void by providing an easy-to-use interface for the whole analysis pipeline of ecological and evolutionary networks starting from matrices of species distributions, genotypes, bacterial OTUs or populations characterized genetically. The user can choose between several different ecological distance metrics, such as Bray-Curtis or Sorensen distance, or population genetic metrics such as FST or Goldstein distances, to turn the raw data into a distance/dissimilarity matrix. This matrix is then transformed into a network by manual or automatic thresholding based on percolation theory or by building the minimum spanning tree. The networks can be visualized along with auxiliary data and analysed with various metrics such as degree, clustering coefficient, assortativity and betweenness centrality. The statistical significance of the results can be estimated either by resampling the original biological data or by null models based on permutations of the data.  
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  Langue (up) Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1755-098x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1119  
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Auteur Toussaint, A.; Beauchard, O.; Oberdorff, T.; Brosse, S.; Villeger, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Historical assemblage distinctiveness and the introduction of widespread non-native species explain worldwide changes in freshwater fish taxonomic dissimilarity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography  
  Volume 23 Numéro 5 Pages 574-584  
  Mots-Clés Beta diversity; differentiation; freshwater fish; homogenization; macroecology; partitioning; turnover  
  Résumé  
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  Langue (up) Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1174  
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Auteur Basset, A.; Barbone, E.; Elliott, M.; Li, B.-L.; Jorgensen, S.E.; Lucena-Moya, P.; Pardo, I.; Mouillot, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre A unifying approach to understanding transitional waters: Fundamental properties emerging from ecotone ecosystems Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés climate change; ecotone concept; landscape ecology; transitional waters  
  Résumé  
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  Langue (up) Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 433  
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Auteur Dupuy, C.; Pagano, M.; Got, P.; Domaizon, I.; Chappuis, A.; Marchessaux, G.; Bouvy, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Trophic relationships between metazooplankton communities and their plankton food sources in the Iles Eparses (Western Indian Ocean) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Environmental Research  
  Volume 116 Numéro Pages 18-31  
  Mots-Clés feeding ecology; grazing effect; Iles Eparses; Mayotte; Metazooplankton; spatial distribution  
  Résumé Coral reef and atoll lagoons are among the most diversified marine ecosystems but also the most affected by the combined effects of climate change and human activities. The Iles Eparses (Scattered Islands) in the Western Indian Ocean have been little affected by human pressure and can be considered to be “pristine” ecosystems. Metazooplankton plays a major role in the functioning and productivity of aquatic ecosystems, and this study was undertaken: (i) to determine the spatial abundance, distribution and species composition of metazooplankton, (ii) to assess the effect of metazooplankton grazing on pico- and nanophytoplankton and (iii) to analyze the trophic positions of metazooplankton by using the stable isotope signatures of a wide variety of taxa and particulate organic matter from the Iles Eparses and Mayotte. Tromelin Island (which is not located in the Mozambique Channel) had the lowest metazooplankton abundance with no cyanobacteria Trichodesmium spp. or mollusks (pteropods) presence, and with δ15N signatures of organisms that were higher than for the islands in the Mozambique Channel. Trichodesmium spp. was found in the Mozambique Channel and the plankton food web was probably based preferentially on these cyanobacteria with lower δ15N signatures indicating direct or indirect trophic transfer of diazotrophic nitrogen to metazooplankton. Three of the islands were distinct: Europa had the highest proportion of copepods, with oithonids being dominant, which is typical of rich mangrove systems, while Juan de Nova and Mayotte seemed to be the sites most affected by human activity with a high abundance of appendicularians and distinct particulate organic matter ∂13C signatures. Grazing experiments showed that food could be a limiting factor for metazooplankton in the Iles Eparses. However, the effect of metazooplankton grazing on phytoplankton appeared to be very low (0.01–2.32% of the total phytoplankton per day).  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue (up) Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0141-1136 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1496  
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