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Auteur Mellin, C.; Mouillot, D.; Kulbicki, M.; McClanahan, T.R.; Vigliola, L.; Bradshaw, C.J.A.; Brainard, R.E.; Chabanet, P.; Edgar, G.J.; Fordham, D.A.; Friedlander, A.M.; Parravicini, V.; Sequeira, A.M.M.; Stuart-Smith, R.D.; Wantiez, L.; Caley, M.J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Humans and seasonal climate variability threaten large-bodied coral reef fish with small ranges Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat Commun  
  Volume 7 Numéro (up) Pages 10491  
  Mots-Clés Biological sciences; Ecology; Oceanography  
  Résumé Coral reefs are among the most species-rich and threatened ecosystems on Earth, yet the extent to which human stressors determine species occurrences, compared with biogeography or environmental conditions, remains largely unknown. With ever-increasing human-mediated disturbances on these ecosystems, an important question is not only how many species can inhabit local communities, but also which biological traits determine species that can persist (or not) above particular disturbance thresholds. Here we show that human pressure and seasonal climate variability are disproportionately and negatively associated with the occurrence of large-bodied and geographically small-ranging fishes within local coral reef communities. These species are 67% less likely to occur where human impact and temperature seasonality exceed critical thresholds, such as in the marine biodiversity hotspot: the Coral Triangle. Our results identify the most sensitive species and critical thresholds of human and climatic stressors, providing opportunity for targeted conservation intervention to prevent local extinctions.  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1537  
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Auteur Legras, G.; Loiseau, N.; Gaertner, J.-C. doi  openurl
  Titre Functional richness: Overview of indices and underlying concepts Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Acta Oecol.-Int. J. Ecol.  
  Volume 87 Numéro (up) Pages 34-44  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; community composition; diversity indexes; ecology; ecosystem processes; fish communities; Functional richness indices; Guidelines; Index properties; intraspecific trait variation; Limitations; phylogenetic diversity; species richness; variability  
  Résumé Functional richness, currently defined as the amount of niche space occupied by the species within a community, is one of the three major components of functional diversity. Different indices have been developed in order to quantify this component. However, the range of indices available for assessing functional richness, often mathematically complex and based on different rationales, can cause confusion for field ecologists and lead to misinterpretation of the results obtained. In this context, we have provided the first study exclusively focused on the comparison of the definitions, advantages and drawbacks of a large set of functional richness indices. The first part of this work is focused on four indices (FDP&G, FRic, TOP and N-hypervolumes indices) that are currently the most commonly used for assessing functional richness. We have completed our study by including recently developed indices that enable us to take into account the intraspecific trait variability (i.e. FRim index and TDP framework), because there is currently a growing scientific consensus regarding the necessity of including this aspect in the assessment of the functional diversity of communities. We demonstrate that although authors have argued that their index describes the functional richness, each of them describes only part of it, and this part may strongly differ from one index to another. Rather than advocating the general use of a single index and/or systematically avoiding others, our study highlights the need for selecting indices in close relation with the context, the available data and the aims of each study. Such a strategy is an essential preliminary step for preventing misunderstanding and artefactual controversies. Along these lines, we propose some guidelines to help users in selecting the most appropriate indices according both to the facet of functional richness on which they wish to focus and to the characteristics of the available data.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1146-609x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2323  
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Auteur Ménard, F.; Potier, M.; Jaquemet, S.; Romanov, E.; Sabatié, R.; Cherel, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Pelagic cephalopods in the western Indian Ocean: New information from diets of top predators Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography  
  Volume 95 Numéro (up) Pages 83-92  
  Mots-Clés ecology; Trophic  
  Résumé Using a combination of diverse large predatory fishes and one seabird, we collected information on the cephalopod fauna of the western Indian Ocean. We analyzed the stomach contents of 35 fishes representing ten families (Xiphiidae, Istiophoridae, Scombridae, Carangidae, Coryphaenidae, Alepisauridae, Dasyatidae, Carcharhinidae, Alopiidae and Sphyrnidae) and of the sooty tern Onychoprion fuscata of the Mozambique Channel from 2000 to 2010. Both fresh and accumulated beaks were used for identifying cephalopod prey. Cephalopods were important prey for twelve predators; swordfish Xiphias gladius had the highest cephalopod proportion; sooty tern (O. fuscata) and bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus) had high proportions too. We recovered 23 cephalopod families and identified 38 species. Ten species from four Teuthida families (Ommastrephidae, Onychoteuthidae, Histioteuthidae and Ancistrocheiridae) and two Octopoda families (Argonautidae and Bolitaenidae) occurred very frequently in the stomach contents, while Sepiida were rare. Ommastrephidae were the most cephalopod food sources: the purpleback flying squid Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis was the most prevalent prey by far, Ornithoteuthis volatilis was important for eleven predators and few but large specimens of the neon flying squid Ommastrephes bartramii were recovered in the stomachs of swordfish in the Indian South Subtropical Gyre province only. Predators' groups were identified based on cephalopod prey composition, on depth in which they forage, and on prey size. Surface predators' diets were characterized by lower cephalopod diversity but greater average numbers of cephalopod prey, whereas the deep-dwelling predators (swordfish and bigeye tuna) preyed on larger specimens than surface predators (O. fuscata or yellowfin tunas Thunnus albacares). Our findings emphasized the usefulness of a community of marine predators to gain valuable information on the biology and the distribution of the cephalopod forage fauna that are discussed with regard to biogeographic province, marine predator, fishing gear to catch the large pelagic fishes, and size of the beaks recovered in the stomachs.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 291  
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Auteur Combe, M.; Bouvier, T.; Pringault, olivier.; Rochelle-Newall, E.; Bouvier, C.; Agis, M.; Pham, V.T.; Torreton, J.-P.; Chu, V.T.; Bettarel, Y. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Freshwater prokaryote and virus communities can adapt to a controlled increase in salinity through changes in their structure and interactions Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science  
  Volume 133 Numéro (up) Pages 58-66  
  Mots-Clés Virus; estuaries; lysogeny; microbial ecology; prokaryote; salinity; tropical aquatic ecosystems  
  Résumé  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 592  
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Auteur Jeanmougin, M.; Leprieur, F.; Lois, G.; Clergeau, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Fine-scale urbanization affects Odonata species diversity in ponds of a megacity (Paris, France) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Acta Oecologica-International Journal of Ecology  
  Volume 59 Numéro (up) Pages 26-34  
  Mots-Clés Evenness; Landscape composition; Model averaging; Ponds; Species diversity; Urban ecology; agricultural landscape; comparative biodiversity; conservation; dragonflies odonata; ecology; fresh-water habitat; patterns; richness; selection; urban  
  Résumé Current developments in urban ecology include very few studies focused on pond ecosystems, though ponds are recognized as biodiversity hotspots. Using Odonata as an indicator model, we explored changes in species composition in ponds localized along an urban gradient of a megacity (Paris, France). We then assessed the relative importance of local- and landscape-scale variables in shaping Odonata alpha-diversity patterns using a model-averaging approach. Analyses were performed for adult (A) and adult plus exuviae (AE) census data. At 26 ponds, we recorded 657 adults and 815 exuviae belonging to 17 Odonata species. The results showed that the Odonata species assemblage composition was not determined by pond localization along the urban gradient. Similarly, pond characteristics were found to be similar among urban, suburban and periurban ponds. The analyses of AE census data revealed that fine-scale urbanization (i.e., increased density of buildings surrounding ponds) negatively affects Odonata alpha-diversity. In contrast, pond localization along the urban gradient weakly explained the alpha-diversity patterns. Several local-scale variables, such as the coverage of submerged macrophytes, were found to be significant drivers of Odonata alpha-diversity. Together, these results show that the degree of urbanization around ponds must be considered instead of pond localization along the urban gradient when assessing the potential impacts of urbanization on Odonata species diversity This work also indicates the importance of exuviae sampling in understanding the response of Odonata to urbanization. (C) 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.  
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  ISSN 1146-609x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 602  
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