bascule de visibilité Search & Display Options

Tout Sélectionner    Désélectionner
 |   | 
Détails
   print
  Enregistrements Liens
Auteur Meistertzheim, A.-L.; Lartaud, F.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Kalenitchenko, D.; Bessalam, M.; Le Bris, N.; Galand, P.E. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Patterns of bacteria-host associations suggest different ecological strategies between two reef building cold-water coral species Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers  
  Volume 114 Numéro Pages (down) 12-22  
  Mots-Clés Bacterial communities; Bacterial ecology; Deep-Sea corals; Lophelia pertusa; Madrepora oculata; Mediterranean Sea; Microbe-microbe and microbe-host interactions  
  Résumé Cold-water corals (CWC) are main ecosystem engineers of the deep sea, and their reefs constitute hot-spots of biodiversity. However, their ecology remains poorly understood, particularly, the nature of the holobiont formed by corals with their associated bacterial communities. Here, we analyzed Madrepora oculata and Lophelia pertusa samples, collected from one location in a Mediterranean canyon in two different seasons (autumn and spring), in order to test for species specificity and temporal stability of the host-bacteria associations. The 16S rRNA sequencing revealed host-specific patterns of bacterial communities associated with L. pertusa and M. oculata, both in terms of community composition and diversity. All analyzed M. oculata polyps exhibited temporally and spatially similar bacterial communities dominated by haplotypes homologous to the known cnidarians-associated genus Endozoicomonas. In contrast, the bacterial communities associated with L. pertusa varied among polyps from the same colony, as well as among distinct colonies and between seasons. While the resilient consortium formed by M. oculata and its bacterial community fit the definition of holobiont, the versatility of the L. pertusa microbiome suggests that this association is more influenced by the environmental conditions or nutritional status. Our results thus highlight distinct host/microbes association strategies for these two closely related Scleractinians sharing the same habitat, suggesting distinct sensitivity to environmental change.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0637 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1565  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Navarro, J.; Saez-Liante, R.; Albo-Puigserver, M.; Coll, M.; Palomera, I. doi  openurl
  Titre Feeding strategies and ecological roles of three predatory pelagic fish in the western Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep-Sea Res. Part II-Top. Stud. Oceanogr.  
  Volume 140 Numéro Pages (down) 9-17  
  Mots-Clés diet; ecosystem structure; iberian peninsula; indian-ocean; isotope ratios; Marine predators; Pelagic ecosystem; Stable isotopes; stable-isotopes; Stomach contents; swordfish; top predators; Trophic ecology; trophic level; xiphias-gladius; Yellowfin tuna  
  Résumé Knowing the feeding ecology of marine predators is pivotal to developing an understanding of their ecological role in the ecosystem and determining the trophic relationships between them. Despite the ecological importance of predatory pelagic fish species, research on these species in the Mediterranean Sea is limited. Here, by combining analyses of stomach contents and stable isotope values, we examined the feeding strategies of swordfish, Xiphias gladius, little tunny, Euthynnus alletteratus and Atlantic bonito, Sarda sarda, in the western Mediterranean Sea. We also compared the trophic niche and trophic level of these species with published information of other sympatric pelagic predators present in the ecosystem. Results indicated that, although the diet of the three species was composed mainly by fin-fish species, a clear segregation in their main feeding strategies was found. Swordfish showed a generalist diet including demersal species such as blue whiting, Micromesistius poutassou, and European hake, Merluccius merluccius, and pelagic fin-fish such as barracudina species (Arctozenus risso and Lestidiops jayakari) or small pelagic fish species. Little tunny and Atlantic bonito were segregated isotopically between them and showed a diet basically composed of anchovy, Engraulis encrasicolus, and round sardinella, Sardinella aurita, and sardines, Sardina pilchardus, respectively. This trophic segregation, in addition to potential segregation by depth, is likely a mechanism that allows their potential coexistence within the same pelagic habitat. When the trophic position of these three predatory pelagic fish species is compared with other pelagic predators such as bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus, and dolphinfish, Coryphaena hippurus, present in the western Mediterranean Sea, we found that they show similar intermediate trophic position in the ecosystem. In conclusion, the combined stomach and isotopic results highlight, especially for little tunny and Atlantic bonito, the trophic importance of Clupeoid species in their diet. In addition, the importance of demersal resources for swordfish provides evidence for the pelagic-demersal coupling of the ecosystem and the need to manage marine resources in an integrated way. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2175  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Siddique, M.A.M.; Butts, I.A.E.; Linhart, O.; Macias, A.D.; Fauvel, C. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Fertilization strategies for Sea Bass Dicentrarchus labrax (Linnaeus, 1758): effects of pre-incubation and duration of egg receptivity in seawater Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquac Res  
  Volume Numéro Pages (down) 1-9  
  Mots-Clés Dicentrarchus labrax; egg longevity; Mediterranean sea bass; overripe eggs; reproductive ecology  
  Résumé Studying gamete biology can provide important information about a species fertilization strategy as well as their reproductive ecology. Currently, there is a lack of knowledge about how long sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax eggs can remain viable after being activated in seawater. The objectives of this study were to understand the effects of pre-incubation of fresh and overripe sea bass eggs in seawater and to determine the duration of egg receptivity. Pooled eggs (fresh and overripe) from four females were pre-incubated in seawater for 0 min (control), 0.5 min, 1 min, 3 min, 10 min and 30 min and then fertilized by pooled sperm from four males. The fresh eggs had a higher fertilization success than overripe eggs. Our results revealed a significant effect of pre-incubation time for both the fresh (P < 0.01) and overripe eggs (P < 0.01). Fertilization success of eggs significantly declined for both these treatments after 3 min of pre-incubation, which clearly indicates that sea bass eggs are able to be fertilized by sperm for up to 3 min after release into seawater. This study has particular importance for understanding fertilization strategies, reproductive potential, as well as reproductive ecology of sea bass.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1365-2109 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1456  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Meynard, C.N.; Kaplan, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Using virtual species to study species distributions and model performance Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Biogeography  
  Volume 40 Numéro 1 Pages (down) 1-8  
  Mots-Clés Auc; predictive ecology; presence-absence; prevalence; Sensitivity; simulations; specificity; threshold; virtual species  
  Résumé Simulations of virtual species (i.e. species for which the environmentoccupancy relationships are known) are increasingly being used to test the effects of different aspects of modelling and sampling strategy on performance of species distribution models (SDMs). Here we discuss an important step of the simulation process: the translation of simulated probabilities of occurrence into patterns of presence and absence. Often a threshold strategy is used to generate virtual occurrences, where presence always occurs above a specific simulated probability value and never below. This procedure effectively translates any shape of simulated species response into a threshold one and eliminates any stochasticity from the species occupancy pattern. We argue that a probabilistic approach should be preferred instead because the threshold response can be treated as a particular case within this framework. This also allows one to address questions relating to the shape of functional responses and avoids convergence issues with some of the most common SDMs. Furthermore, threshold-based virtual species studies generate over-optimistic performance measures that lack classification error or incorporate error from a mixture of sampling and modelling choices. Incorrect use of a threshold approach can have significant consequences for the practising biogeographer. For example, low model performance may be interpreted as due to sample bias or poor model choice, rather than being related to fundamental biological responses to environmental gradients. We exemplify these shortcomings with a case study where we compare results from threshold and probabilistic simulation approaches.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 246  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Heerah, K.; Cox, S.L.; Blevin, P.; Guinet, C.; Charrassin, J.-B. doi  openurl
  Titre Validation of Dive Foraging Indices Using Archived and Transmitted Acceleration Data: The Case of the Weddell Seal Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Frontiers In Ecology And Evolution  
  Volume 7 Numéro Pages (down)  
  Mots-Clés diving behavior; foraging; biologging; accelerometers; movement ecology; satellite relayed data logger; sea-ice  
  Résumé Dive data collected from archival and satellite tags can provide valuable information on foraging activity via the characterization of movement patterns (e.g., wiggles, hunting time). However, a lack of validation limits interpretation of what these metrics truly represent in terms of behavior and how predators interact with prey. Head-mounted accelerometers have proven to be effective for detecting prey catch attempt (PrCA) behaviors, and thus can provide a more direct measure of foraging activity. However, device retrieval is typically required to access the high-resolution data they record, restricting use to animals returning to predictable locations. In this study, we present and validate data obtained from newly developed satellite-relay data tags, capable of remotely transmitting summaries of tri-axial accelerometer measurements. We then use these summaries to assess foraging metrics generated from dive data only. Tags were deployed on four female Weddell seals in November 2014 at Dumont d'Urville, and successfully acquired data over similar to 2 months. Retrieved archival data for one individual, and transmitted data for four individuals were used to (1) compare and validate abstracted accelerometer transmissions against outputs from established processing procedures, and (2) assess the validity of previously developed dive foraging indices, calculated solely from time-depth measurements. We found transmitted estimates of PrCA behaviors were generally comparable to those obtained from archival processing, although a small but consistent over-estimation was noted. Following this, dive foraging segments were identified either from (1) sinuosity in the trajectories of high-resolution depth archives, or (2) vertical speeds between low resolution transmissions of key depth inflection points along a dive profile. In both cases, more than 93% of the estimated PrCA behaviors (from either abstracted transmissions or archival processing) fell into inferred dive foraging segments (i.e., “hunting” segments), suggesting the two methods provide a reliable indicator of foraging effort. The validation of transmitted acceleration data and foraging indices derived fromtime-depth recordings for Weddell seals offers new avenues for the study of foraging activity and dive energetics. This is especially pertinent for species from which tag retrieval is challenging, but also for the post-processing of the numerous low-resolution dive datasets already available.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2296-701x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2590  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
Tout Sélectionner    Désélectionner
 |   | 
Détails
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: