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Auteur Parravicini, V.; Villeger, S.; McClanahan, T.R.; Arias-Gonzalez, J.E.; Bellwood, D.R.; Belmaker, J.; Chabanet, P.; Floeter, S.R.; Friedlander, A.M.; Guilhaumon, F.; Vigliola, L.; Kulbicki, M.; Mouillot, D. url  doi
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  Titre Global mismatch between species richness and vulnerability of reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecology Letters  
  Volume 17 Numéro 9 Pages (down) 1101-1110  
  Mots-Clés Vulnerability; biodiversity; biodiversity loss; conservation; coral-reefs; extinction; fisheries; functional diversity; hotspots; macroecology; marine; patterns; protected areas; risk assessment; sensitivity  
  Résumé The impact of anthropogenic activity on ecosystems has highlighted the need to move beyond the biogeographical delineation of species richness patterns to understanding the vulnerability of species assemblages, including the functional components that are linked to the processes they support. We developed a decision theory framework to quantitatively assess the global taxonomic and functional vulnerability of fish assemblages on tropical reefs using a combination of sensitivity to species loss, exposure to threats and extent of protection. Fish assemblages with high taxonomic and functional sensitivity are often exposed to threats but are largely missed by the global network of marine protected areas. We found that areas of high species richness spatially mismatch areas of high taxonomic and functional vulnerability. Nevertheless, there is strong spatial match between taxonomic and functional vulnerabilities suggesting a potential win-win conservation-ecosystem service strategy if more protection is set in these locations.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 630  
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Auteur Toledo, P.; Darnaude, A.M.; Niklitschek, E.J.; Ojeda, V.; Voue, R.; Leiva, F.P.; Labonne, M.; Canales-Aguirre, C.B. doi  openurl
  Titre Partial migration and early size of southern hake Merluccius australis: a journey between estuarine and oceanic habitats off Northwest Patagonia Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée ICES J. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 76 Numéro 4 Pages (down) 1094-1106  
  Mots-Clés age estimation; early size; ecology; evolution; fish otoliths; growth; history; Merluccius australis; nor-Patagonia; otolith microchemistry; otoliths; parameters; partial migration; productivity; stability  
  Résumé Partial migration is a key adaptive strategy, increasingly observed across multiple taxa. To investigate partial migration and life-cycle diversity of Merluccius australis in northwestern Patagonia, we analysed isotopic (delta C-13, delta O-18) and elemental (B-11, Na-23, Mg-24, Mn-55, Sr-86, Ba-138) compositions of otoliths from juveniles, sub-adults, and adults to identify nursery origins, habitats used, and migratory behaviours of multiple cohorts (1990-2005). Influence of early size upon migration was assessed by comparing back-calculated sizes at demersal recruitment between resident and migratory adults. Although partial migration occurred at both estuarine and oceanic nursery habitats, migratory behaviour was more frequent in fish of estuarine origin (59%) than in fish of oceanic origin (17%). Adults of estuarine origin dominated both estuarine (92%) and oceanic (77%) sampling areas. Although we found no significant differences in size at demersal recruitment between oceanic-resident and oceanic-migratory fish, a strong relationship between size at demersal recruitment and migratory behaviour appeared in fish of estuarine origin, whose probability of migration increased from 5% to 95% as demersal recruitment size increased from 18.8 to 23.6cm. Further research on M. australis life cycle is required to incorporate sub-population processes into the stock assessment and management models being used for this overexploited species.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1054-3139 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000484404900029 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2643  
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Auteur Gravel, D.; Poisot, T.; Albouy, C.; Velez, L.; Mouillot, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Inferring food web structure from predator-prey body size relationships Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Methods in Ecology and Evolution  
  Volume 4 Numéro 11 Pages (down) 1083-1090  
  Mots-Clés Body size; Niche model; biodiversity; climate-change; community; constraints; ecological networks; ecology; ecosystems; food web; impacts; interaction strengths; metaweb; models; species richness  
  Résumé 1. Current global changes make it important to be able to predict which interactions will occur in the emerging ecosystems. Most of the current methods to infer the existence of interactions between two species require a good knowledge of their behaviour or a direct observation of interactions. In this paper, we overcome these limitations by developing a method, inspired from the niche model of food web structure, using the statistical relationship between predator and prey body size to infer the matrix of potential interactions among a pool of species. 2. The novelty of our approach is to infer, for any species of a given species pool, the three species-specific parameters of the niche model. The method applies to both local and metaweb scales. It allows one to evaluate the feeding interactions of a new species entering the community. 3. We find that this method gives robust predictions of the structure of food webs and that its efficiency is increased when the strength of the body-size relationship between predators and preys increases. 4. We finally illustrate the potential of the method to infer the metaweb structure of pelagic fishes of the Mediterranean sea under different global change scenarios.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2041-210x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 674  
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Auteur Courbin, N.; Besnard, A.; Peron, C.; Saraux, C.; Fort, J.; Perret, S.; Tornos, J.; Gremillet, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Short-term prey field lability constrains individual specialisation in resource selection and foraging site fidelity in a marine predator Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Lett.  
  Volume 21 Numéro 7 Pages (down) 1043-1054  
  Mots-Clés behavior; Behavioural consistency; Calonectris diomedea; diet; ecology; foraging site fidelity; gannets; habitat selection; mediterranean sea; models; movement; resource selection; Scopoli's shearwater; seabirds; strategies; temporal resource dynamic; Western Mediterranean  
  Résumé Spatio-temporally stable prey distributions coupled with individual foraging site fidelity are predicted to favour individual resource specialisation. Conversely, predators coping with dynamic prey distributions should diversify their individual diet and/or shift foraging areas to increase net intake. We studied individual specialisation in Scopoli's shearwaters (Calonectris diomedea) from the highly dynamic Western Mediterranean, using daily prey distributions together with resource selection, site fidelity and trophic-level analyses. As hypothesised, we found dietary diversification, low foraging site fidelity and almost no individual specialisation in resource selection. Crucially, shearwaters switched daily foraging tactics, selecting areas with contrasting prey of varying trophic levels. Overall, information use and plastic resource selection of individuals with reduced short-term foraging site fidelity allow predators to overcome prey field lability. Our study is an essential step towards a better understanding of individual responses to enhanced environmental stochasticity driven by global changes, and of pathways favouring population persistence.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2380  
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Auteur Soissons, L.M.; van Katwijk, M.M.; Li, B.; Han, Q.; Ysebaert, T.; Herman, P.M.J.; Bouma, T.J. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecosystem engineering creates a new path to resilience in plants with contrasting growth strategies Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Oecologia  
  Volume 191 Numéro 4 Pages (down) 1015-1024  
  Mots-Clés competition; dynamics; ecology; eelgrass zostera-marina; exposure; indicators; organisms; Recovery from disturbance; Resistance to stress; Seagrass; seagrass beds; sediment-nutrient; stiffness; Sulphide intrusion  
  Résumé Plant species can be characterized by different growth strategies related to their inherent growth and recovery rates, which shape their responses to stress and disturbance. Ecosystem engineering, however, offers an alternative way to cope with stress: modifying the environment may reduce stress levels. Using an experimental study on two seagrass species with contrasting traits, the slow-growing Zostera marina vs. the fast-growing Zostera japonica, we explored how growth strategies versus ecosystem engineering may affect their resistance to stress (i.e. addition of organic material) and recovery from disturbance (i.e. removal of above-ground biomass). Ecosystem engineering was assessed by measuring sulphide levels in the sediment porewater, as seagrass plants can keep sulphide levels low by aerating the rhizosphere. Consistent with predictions, we observed that the fast-growing species had a high capacity to recover from disturbance. It was also more resistant to stress and still able to maintain high standing stock with increasing stress levels because of its ecosystem engineering capacity. The slow-growing species was not able to maintain its standing stock under stress, which we ascribe to a weak capacity for ecosystem engineering regarding this particular stress. Overall, our study suggests that the combination of low-cost investment in tissues with ecosystem engineering to alleviate stress creates a new path in the growth trade-off between investment in strong tissues or fast growth. It does so by being both fast in recovery and more resistant. As such low-cost ecosystem engineering may occur in more species, we argue that it should be considered in assessing plant resilience.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000496412400025 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2659  
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