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Auteur (up) Cruaud, P.; Decker, C.; Olu, K.; Arnaud-Haond, S.; Papot, C.; Le Baut, J.; Vigneron, A.; Khripounoff, A.; Gayet, N.; Cathalot, C.; Caprais, J.-C.; Pignet, P.; Godfroy, A.; Cambon-Bonavita, M.-A. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecophysiological differences between vesicomyid species and metabolic capabilities of their symbionts influence distribution patterns of the deep-sea clams Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Evol. Persp.  
  Volume 40 Numéro 3 Pages e12541  
  Mots-Clés calyptogena-magnifica; chemoautotrophic bacteria; cold seeps; community structure; deep-sea ecosystems; evolutionary relationships; guaymas basin; Guaymas Basin; gulf-of-california; hydrothermal vent clam; macrofaunal communities; marine ecology; pliocardinae bivalve; sulfide-rich sediments; sulfur storage; vesicomyid movements  
  Résumé This study provides an analysis of vesicomyid bivalve-symbiont community distribution across cold seep and hydrothermal vent areas in the Guaymas Basin (Gulf of California, Mexico). Using a combination of morphological and molecular approaches including fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and electronic microscopy observations, vesicomyid clam species and their associated symbionts were characterized and results were analyzed in light of geochemical conditions and other on-site observations. A greater diversity of vesicomyids was found at cold seep areas, where three different species were present (Phreagena soyoae [syn. kilmeri], Archivesica gigas, and Calyptogena pacifica). In contrast, A. gigas was the only species sampled across the hydrothermal vent area. The same haplotype of A. gigas was found in both hydrothermal vent and cold seep areas, highlighting possible contemporary exchanges among neighboring vents and seeps. In either ecosystem, molecular characterization of the symbionts confirmed the specificity between symbionts and hosts and supported the hypothesis of a predominantly vertical transmission. In addition, patterns of clams could reflect potential niche preferences for each species. The occurrence of numerous traces of vesicomyid movements on sediments in the sites colonized by A. gigas seemed to indicate that this species might have a better ability to move. Furthermore, variation in gill sulfur content could reveal a higher plasticity and sulfur storage capacity in A. gigas. Thus, the distribution of vesicomyid species across the chemosynthetic areas of the Guaymas Basin could be explained by differences in biological traits of the vesicomyid species that would allow A. gigas to more easily exploit transient and punctual sources of available sulfide than P. soyoae.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0173-9565 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000472949800006 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2605  
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Auteur (up) Darling, E.S.; Graham, N.A.J.; Januchowski-Hartley, F.A.; Nash, K.L.; Pratchett, M.S.; Wilson, S.K. doi  openurl
  Titre Relationships between structural complexity, coral traits, and reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Coral Reefs  
  Volume 36 Numéro 2 Pages 561-575  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; community; coral reef fish; diversity; ecosystems; fisheries; functional ecology; Habitat complexity; Habitat diversity; life; marine reserves; ocean acidification; Reef architecture; scleractinian corals; species traits; vulnerability  
  Résumé With the ongoing loss of coral cover and the associated flattening of reef architecture, understanding the links between coral habitat and reef fishes is of critical importance. Here, we investigate whether considering coral traits and functional diversity provides new insights into the relationship between structural complexity and reef fish communities, and whether coral traits and community composition can predict structural complexity. Across 157 sites in Seychelles, Maldives, the Chagos Archipelago, and Australia's Great Barrier Reef, we find that structural complexity and reef zone are the strongest and most consistent predictors of reef fish abundance, biomass, species richness, and trophic structure. However, coral traits, diversity, and life histories provided additional predictive power for models of reef fish assemblages, and were key drivers of structural complexity. Our findings highlight that reef complexity relies on living corals-with different traits and life histories-continuing to build carbonate skeletons, and that these nuanced relationships between coral assemblages and habitat complexity can affect the structure of reef fish assemblages. Seascape-level estimates of structural complexity are rapid and cost effective with important implications for the structure and function of fish assemblages, and should be incorporated into monitoring programs.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0722-4028 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2150  
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Auteur (up) Drouineau, H.; Lobry, J.; Bez, N.; Travers-Trolet, M.; Vermard, Y.; Gascuel, D. doi  openurl
  Titre The need for a protean fisheries science to address the degradation of exploited aquatic ecosystems Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquat. Living Resour.  
  Volume 29 Numéro 2 Pages Unsp-E201  
  Mots-Clés climate-change; eafm; Ecology; Fisheries management; fisheries science; individual-based model; Management strategy evaluation; marine ecosystems; marine resources; models; Movement; ocean; Sustainability; uncertainty; vms data  
  Résumé In this introductory paper we highlight key questions that were discussed during the symposium on “Status, functioning and shifts in marine ecosystems” organized by the Association Francaise d'Halieutique (French Association for Fisheries Sciences, Montpellier, France, July 2015). This symposium illustrated that fisheries science is now working at multiple scales and on all dimensions of socio-ecosystems (ecological, political, sociological, and economic), with a great diversity of approaches and taking into account different levels of complexity while acknowledging diverse sources of uncertainty. We argue that we should go one step further and call for a protean fisheries science to address the deteriorated states of aquatic ecosystems caused by anthropogenic pressures. Protean science is constantly evolving to meet emerging issues, while improving its coherence and integration capacity in its complexity. This science must be nourished by multiple approaches and be capable of addressing all organizational scales, from individual fish or fishermen up to the entire ecosystem, include society, its economy and the services it derives from aquatic systems. Such a protean science is required to address the complexity of ecosystem functioning and of the impacts of anthropogenic pressures.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0990-7440 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2066  
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Auteur (up) Duffy, L.M.; Kuhnert, P.; Pethybridge, H.R.; Young, J.W.; Olson, R.J.; Logan, J.M.; Goñi, N.; Romanov, E.; Allain, V.; Staudinger, M.; Abecassis, M.; Choy, C.A.; Hobday, A.J.; Simier, M.; Galván-Magaña, F.; Potier, M.; Ménard, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Global trophic ecology of yellowfin, bigeye, and albacore tunas: understanding predation on micronekton communities at ocean-basin scales Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography  
  Volume 140 Numéro Pages 55-73  
  Mots-Clés classification trees; climate changes; ecosystems; food webs; inter-ocean comparison; macroecology; Meta-analysis; trophic relationships  
  Résumé Predator-prey interactions for three commercially valuable tuna species: yellowfin (Thunnus albacares), bigeye (T. obesus), and albacore (T. alalunga), collected over a 40-year period from the Pacific, Indian, and Atlantic Oceans, were used to quantitatively assess broad, macro-scale trophic patterns in pelagic ecosystems. Analysis of over 14,000 tuna stomachs, using a modified classification tree approach, revealed for the first time the global expanse of pelagic predatory fish diet and global patterns of micronekton diversity. Ommastrephid squids were consistently one of the top prey groups by weight across all tuna species and in most ocean bodies. Interspecific differences in prey were apparent, with epipelagic scombrid and mesopelagic paralepidid fishes globally important for yellowfin and bigeye tunas, respectively, while vertically-migrating euphausiid crustaceans were important for albacore tuna in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Diet diversity showed global and regional patterns among tuna species. In the central and western Pacific Ocean, characterized by low productivity, a high diversity of micronekton prey was consumed while low prey diversity was evident in highly productive coastal waters where upwelling occurs. Spatial patterns of diet diversity were most variable in yellowfin and bigeye tunas while a latitudinal diversity gradient was observed with lower diversity in temperate regions for albacore tuna. Sea-surface temperature was a reasonable predictor of the diets of yellowfin and bigeye tunas, whereas chlorophyll-a was the best environmental predictor of albacore diet. These results suggest that the ongoing expansion of warmer, less productive waters in the world’s oceans may alter foraging opportunities for tunas due to regional changes in prey abundances and compositions.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2102  
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Auteur (up) Dupuy, C.; Pagano, M.; Got, P.; Domaizon, I.; Chappuis, A.; Marchessaux, G.; Bouvy, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Trophic relationships between metazooplankton communities and their plankton food sources in the Iles Eparses (Western Indian Ocean) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Environmental Research  
  Volume 116 Numéro Pages 18-31  
  Mots-Clés feeding ecology; grazing effect; Iles Eparses; Mayotte; Metazooplankton; spatial distribution  
  Résumé Coral reef and atoll lagoons are among the most diversified marine ecosystems but also the most affected by the combined effects of climate change and human activities. The Iles Eparses (Scattered Islands) in the Western Indian Ocean have been little affected by human pressure and can be considered to be “pristine” ecosystems. Metazooplankton plays a major role in the functioning and productivity of aquatic ecosystems, and this study was undertaken: (i) to determine the spatial abundance, distribution and species composition of metazooplankton, (ii) to assess the effect of metazooplankton grazing on pico- and nanophytoplankton and (iii) to analyze the trophic positions of metazooplankton by using the stable isotope signatures of a wide variety of taxa and particulate organic matter from the Iles Eparses and Mayotte. Tromelin Island (which is not located in the Mozambique Channel) had the lowest metazooplankton abundance with no cyanobacteria Trichodesmium spp. or mollusks (pteropods) presence, and with δ15N signatures of organisms that were higher than for the islands in the Mozambique Channel. Trichodesmium spp. was found in the Mozambique Channel and the plankton food web was probably based preferentially on these cyanobacteria with lower δ15N signatures indicating direct or indirect trophic transfer of diazotrophic nitrogen to metazooplankton. Three of the islands were distinct: Europa had the highest proportion of copepods, with oithonids being dominant, which is typical of rich mangrove systems, while Juan de Nova and Mayotte seemed to be the sites most affected by human activity with a high abundance of appendicularians and distinct particulate organic matter ∂13C signatures. Grazing experiments showed that food could be a limiting factor for metazooplankton in the Iles Eparses. However, the effect of metazooplankton grazing on phytoplankton appeared to be very low (0.01–2.32% of the total phytoplankton per day).  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0141-1136 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1496  
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