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Auteur (up) Lopez, N.; Navarro, J.; Barria, C.; Albo-Puigserver, M.; Coll, M.; Palomera, I.
Titre Feeding ecology of two demersal opportunistic predators coexisting in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci.
Volume 175 Numéro Pages 15-23
Mots-Clés abundance; anglerfish lophius-budegassa; Black anglerfish; communities; diet; fish; habits; linnaeus; Lophius budegassa; Lophius piscatorius; osteichthyes; piscatorius; Spatial distributions; Stable isotopes; Stomach contents; Trophic ecology; White anglerfish
Résumé The study of the feeding ecology of marine organisms is crucial to understanding their ecological roles and advancing our knowledge of marine ecosystem functioning. The aim of this study was to analyse the trophic ecology of two demersal predator species, black anglerfish (Lophius budegassa) and white anglerfish (L. piscatorius), in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. Both species are important in the study area due to their high abundance and economic value, but information about their feeding behaviour is scarce. Here, we described the diet composition and ecological role of these two species, investigating whether trophic segregation exists between them and amongst fish of different sizes. In addition, by using experimental survey data we described the spatial distribution of both species to help us interpret trophic behaviour patterns. We gathered samples of two different sizes (small individuals of a total length <30 cm and large individuals >= 30 cm) of both species and combined stomach content analyses (SCA) and stable isotope analyses (SIA) of nitrogen and carbon with isotopic mixing models. Our results revealed that both anglerfish species are opportunistic predators, showing a diet composed mainly of fishes and, to a lesser extent, of crustaceans, with a small proportion of cephalopods, gastropods, bivalves and echinoderms. We found trophic segregation between the two species and the two sizes, indicating that they feed on different prey, in line with differences in their spatial distribution within the study area. This partial partition of food resources could also be explained by the differences in rhythms of activity that were reported in previous studies. In addition, although both species occupied a high position within the food web, our results showed that white anglerfish individuals and the large-sized fish of both species held higher trophic positions. This study demonstrates the usefulness of complementary approaches for trophic studies and confirms that both anglerfish species play an important role as predators in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea food web. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1647
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Auteur (up) Maire, Eva; Grenouillet, G.; Brosse, S.; Villeger, S.
Titre How many dimensions are needed to accurately assess functional diversity? A pragmatic approach for assessing the quality of functional spaces Type Article scientifique
Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography
Volume 24 Numéro 6 Pages 728-740
Mots-Clés Diversity indices; functional dendrogram; functional dissimilarity; functional ecology; functional traits; multidimensional space
Résumé Aim Functional diversity is a key facet of biodiversity that is increasingly being measured to quantify its changes following disturbance and to understand its effects on ecosystem functioning. Assessing the functional diversity of assemblages based on species traits requires the building of a functional space (dendrogram or multidimensional space) where indices will be computed. However, there is still no consensus on the best method for measuring the quality of functional spaces. Innovation Here we propose a framework for evaluating the quality of a functional space (i.e. the extent to which it is a faithful representation of the initial functional trait values). Using simulated datasets, we analysed the influence of the number and type of functional traits used and of the number of species studied on the identity and quality of the best functional space. We also tested whether the quality of the functional space affects functional diversity patterns in local assemblages, using simulated datasets and a real study case. Main conclusions The quality of functional space strongly varied between situations. Spaces having at least four dimensions had the highest quality, while functional dendrograms and two-dimensional functional spaces always had a low quality. Importantly, we showed that using a poor-quality functional space could led to a biased assessment of functional diversity and false ecological conclusions. Therefore, we advise a pragmatic approach consisting of computing all the possible functional spaces and selecting the most parsimonious one.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1341
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Auteur (up) Maloufi, S.; Catherine, A.; Mouillot, D.; Louvard, C.; Couté, A.; Bernard, C.; Troussellier, M.
Titre Environmental heterogeneity among lakes promotes hyper β-diversity across phytoplankton communities Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Freshw Biol
Volume 61 Numéro 5 Pages 633-645
Mots-Clés environmental heterogeneity; meta-community ecology; Phytoplankton; species sorting; turnover
Résumé * The extent to which stochastic and deterministic processes influence variations in species communities across space and time remains a central question in theoretical and applied ecology. Despite their high dispersal ability, the composition of phytoplankton communities displays striking spatial variations among lakes even at small spatial scale. * To investigate the mechanisms underlying the distribution of phytoplankton species, we evaluate the contribution of stochastic, spatial and environmental processes in determining β-diversity patterns of phytoplankton at a regional scale. Phytoplankton communities were surveyed in 50 different lakes from north-central France, a region characterised by strong environmental heterogeneity. * The regional species pool was characterised by extremely high β-diversity levels, which were mainly explained by species replacement (i.e. turnover) rather than by differences in species richness (i.e. nestedness). Null models of random species distribution and spatial processes failed to explain observed β-diversity patterns. At the opposite, local environmental conditions strongly influenced the degree of uniqueness of local phytoplankton communities, with the most contrasted environments, including human-dominated areas, promoting highly distinct phytoplankton communities. * Our results suggest that species-sorting mechanisms that arise from variations in local environmental conditions drive high species turnover at the region scale. Thus, in a landscape strongly impacted by cultural eutrophication, further anthropogenic impacts on aquatic ecosystems would likely induce regional homogenisation of phytoplankton communities. Overall, our study supports the fact that the management of lakes and reservoirs in anthropic landscapes should aim at maintaining environmental heterogeneity while preventing further eutrophication in order to favour the maintenance of high phytoplankton β- and γ-diversity.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1365-2427 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1569
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Auteur (up) Manna, L.R.; Villeger, S.; Rezende, C.F.; Mazzoni, R.
Titre High intraspecific variability in morphology and diet in tropical stream fish communities Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Freshw. Fish
Volume 28 Numéro 1 Pages 41-52
Mots-Clés approach reveals; assemblages; body-size; community ecology; competition; ecology; functional diversity; functional traits; habitat use; originality; plasticity; rainforest stream; savannah stream; specialisation; specialization; traits
Résumé Functional diversity of fish communities has been measured according to (a) interspecific variability, assuming that intraspecific variability is negligible, or (b) morphological differences, as good descriptors of complex functions, such as diet. These two assumptions have been scarcely tested on the individual level, especially in species-rich tropical ecosystems. Here, we adapted intraspecific specialisation (ISpe) and intraspecific originality indices (IOri) to assess complementary components of intraspecific variability. Next, we applied these indices to evaluate the intra- and interspecific variability of morphological and diet traits in two contrasting Brazilian stream-dwelling fish assemblages (rainforest and savannah). We also compared correlations between morphology and diet at the individual and species level to test whether accounting for intraspecific variability increases the predictability of diet due to morphological differences. Significant contributions of intraspecific variability to differences between fish were revealed for morphology and diet. Intraspecific variability in the diet was higher than that in morphology in both assemblages. The ISpe was positively correlated to IOri in the diet of both ecosystems. The morphological-dietary relationships were significant but weak at both individual and species levels. Our findings highlight the importance of measuring individual variability and accounting for complementary components of the intraspecific variability (ISpe and IOri). Importantly, we showed that the variability in morphology does not predict diet variability at both intra- and interspecific levels. Thus, high intraspecific variability in morphology and diet challenges the use of functional traits measured at the species level to describe the functional diversity of different fish assemblages.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0906-6691 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2472
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Auteur (up) Mariani, P.; Křivan, V.; MacKenzie, B.R.; Mullon, C.
Titre The migration game in habitat network: the case of tuna Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Theor Ecol
Volume 9 Numéro 2 Pages 219-232
Mots-Clés Bluefin tuna; Game theory; Habitat selection; Ideal free distribution; Plant Sciences; Structured population; Theoretical Ecology/Statistics; Zoology
Résumé Long-distance migration is a widespread process evolved independently in several animal groups in terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Many factors contribute to the migration process and of primary importance are intra-specific competition and seasonality in the resource distribution. Adaptive migration in direction of increasing fitness should lead to the ideal free distribution (IFD) which is the evolutionary stable strategy of the habitat selection game. We introduce a migration game which focuses on migrating dynamics leading to the IFD for age-structured populations and in time varying habitats, where dispersal is costly. The model predicts migration dynamics between these habitats and the corresponding population distribution. When applied to Atlantic bluefin tunas, it predicts their migration routes and their seasonal distribution. The largest biomass is located in the spawning areas which have also the largest diversity in the age-structure. Distant feeding areas are occupied on a seasonal base and often by larger individuals, in agreement with empirical observations. Moreover, we show that only a selected number of migratory routes emerge as those effectively used by tunas.
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1874-1738, 1874-1746 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1465
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