bascule de visibilité Search & Display Options

Tout Sélectionner    Désélectionner
 |   | 
Détails
   print
  Enregistrements Liens
Auteur van Gils, J.A.; van der Geest, M.; De Meulenaer, B.; Gillis, H.; Piersma, T.; Folmer, E.O. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Moving on with foraging theory: incorporating movement decisions into the functional response of a gregarious shorebird Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Animal Ecology  
  Volume 84 Numéro Pages 554-564  
  Mots-Clés competition continuous-time Markov chain cryptic interference diet distribution habitat choice intake rate movement ecology predation toxic prey SPATIAL-DISTRIBUTION RED KNOTS MODELING INTERFERENCE CRYPTIC INTERFERENCE STOCHASTIC VERSION BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY MULTISTATE MODELS BANC-DARGUIN GROUP-SIZE PREY Ecology Zoology  
  Résumé (up) 1. Models relating intake rate to food abundance and competitor density (generalized functional response models) can predict forager distributions and movements between patches, but we lack understanding of how distributions and small-scale movements by the foragers themselves affect intake rates. Using a state-of-the-art approach based on continuous-time Markov chain dynamics, we add realism to classic functional response models by acknowledging that the chances to encounter food and competitors are influenced by movement decisions, and, vice versa, that movement decisions are influenced by these encounters. We used a multi-state modelling framework to construct a stochastic functional response model in which foragers alternate between three behavioural states: searching, handling and moving. Using behavioural observations on a molluscivore migrant shorebird (red knot, Calidris canutus canutus), at its main wintering area (Banc d'Arguin, Mauritania), we estimated transition rates between foraging states as a function of conspecific densities and densities of the two main bivalve prey. Intake rate decreased with conspecific density. This interference effect was not due to decreased searching efficiency, but resulted from time lost to avoidance movements. Red knots showed a strong functional response to one prey (Dosinia isocardia), but a weak response to the other prey (Loripes lucinalis). This corroborates predictions from a recently developed optimal diet model that accounts for the mildly toxic effects due to consuming Loripes. Using model averaging across the most plausible multi-state models, the fully parameterized functional response model was then used to predict intake rate for an independent data set on habitat choice by red knot. Comparison of the sites selected by red knots with random sampling sites showed that the birds fed at sites with higher than average Loripes and Dosinia densities, that is sites for which we predicted higher than average intake rates. We discuss the limitations of Holling's classic functional response model which ignores movement and the limitations of contemporary movement ecological theory that ignores consumer-resource interactions. With the rapid advancement of technologies to track movements of individual foragers at fine spatial scales, the time is ripe to integrate descriptive tracking studies with stochastic movement-based functional response models.  
  Adresse [van Gils, Jan A.; van der Geest, Matthijs; De Meulenaer, Brecht; Gillis, Hanneke; Piersma, Theunis; Folmer, Eelke O.] NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. [van der Geest, Matthijs; Piersma, Theunis] Univ Groningen, Anim Ecol Grp, Ctr Ecol & Evolutionary Studies CEES, Chair Global Flyway Ecol, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. van Gils, JA (reprint author), NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, POB 59, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. Jan.van.Gils@nioz.nl  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0021-8790 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes ISI Document Delivery No.: CB9RB Times Cited: 0 Cited Reference Count: 61 van Gils, Jan A. van der Geest, Matthijs De Meulenaer, Brecht Gillis, Hanneke Piersma, Theunis Folmer, Eelke O. NWO WOTRO [W.01.65.221.00]; NWO [R 84-639]; NWO VIDI [864.09.002] We thank Parc National du Banc d'Arguin (PNBA) for their hospitality, the hosting of our presence and the permission to work in and from the Iwik scientific station. Lemhaba ould Yarba made the logistic arrangements. Joop van Eerbeek, Erik J. Jansen, Han Olff and El-Hacen Mohamed El-Hacen helped collecting and sorting benthos samples. Valuable comments on the manuscript were given by Allert Bijleveld, Jaap van der Meer, Ola Olsson, Thomas Oudman, Isabel M. Smallegange, an anonymous referee and by the 'literature club' of the Centre for Integrative Ecology during JAvG's sabbatical at Deakin University. Dick Visser polished the figures. This work is supported by an NWO WOTRO Integrated Programme grant (W.01.65.221.00) to TP, an NWO travel grant (R 84-639) to EOF, and an NWO VIDI grant (864.09.002) to JAvG. 0 WILEY-BLACKWELL HOBOKEN J ANIM ECOL Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ 1412 collection 1383  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Thiebault, A.; Dubroca, L.; Mullers, R.H.E.; Tremblay, Y.; Pistorius, P.A. doi  openurl
  Titre “M2B” package in R: Deriving multiple variables from movement data to predict behavioural states with random forests Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Methods Ecol. Evol.  
  Volume 9 Numéro 6 Pages 1548-1555  
  Mots-Clés Cape gannet; classification; ecology; fisheries; gps; local enhancement; machine learning; onboard observers; social interactions; video cameras  
  Résumé (up) 1. The behaviour of individuals affect their distributions and is therefore fundamental in determining ecological patterns. While, the direct observation of behaviour is often limited due to logistical constraints, collection of movement data has been greatly facilitated through the development of bio-logging. Movement data obtained through tracking instrumentation may potentially constitute a relevant proxy to infer behaviour. 2. To infer behaviour from movement data is a key focus within the “movement ecology” discipline. Statistical learning constitutes a number of methods that can be used to assess the link between given variables from a fully informed training dataset and then predict the values on a non-informed variable. We chose the random forest algorithm for its high prediction accuracy and its ease of implementation. The strength of random forest partly lies in its ability to handle a very large number of variables. Our methodology is accordingly based on the derivation of multiple predictor variables from movement data over various temporal scales, to capture as much information as possible from changes and variations in movement. 3. The methodology is described in four steps, using examples on foraging seabirds and fishing vessels for illustration. The models showed very high prediction accuracy (92%-97%), thereby confirming the influence of behaviour on movement decisions and demonstrating the ability to derive multiple variables from movement data to predict behaviour with random forests. 4. The codes developed for this methodology are published in the “M2B” (Movement to Behaviour) R package, available at https://CRAN.R-project.org/package=m2b. They can be used and adapted to datasets where movement was sampled from a wide range of taxa, sampling schemes or tracking devices. Observations are needed for a subset of the data, but once the model is trained, it can be used on any dataset with similar movement data.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2041-210x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2382  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Abgrall, C.; Chauvat, M.; Langlois, E.; Hedde, M.; Mouillot, D.; Salmon, S.; Winck, B.; Forey, E. doi  openurl
  Titre Shifts and linkages of functional diversity between above- and below-ground compartments along a flooding gradient Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Funct. Ecol.  
  Volume 31 Numéro 2 Pages 350-360  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; community assembly; community ecology; disturbance; divergence; environmental gradient; feeding guilds; functional traits; microarthropod communities; null models; patterns; plant; plant communities; soil collembola; soil-plant interactions; species traits; trait convergence and trait divergence  
  Résumé (up) 1. Trait-based approaches have the potential to reveal general and predictive relationships between organisms and ecosystem functioning. However, the mechanisms underlying the functional structure of communities are still unclear. Within terrestrial ecosystems, several studies have shown that many ecological processes are controlled by the interacting above-and belowground compartments. However, few studies have used traits to reveal the functional relationships between plants and soil fauna. Mostly, research combining plants and soil fauna solely used the traits of one assemblage in predictive studies. 2. Above-ground (plants) and below-ground (Collembola) compartments were sampled over a flooding gradient in northern France along the Seine River. First, we measured the effect of flooding on functional and taxonomic assembly within both communities. We then considered the linkages between plant and Collembolan species richness, community traits and assessed whether traits of both compartments converged at high flooding intensity (abiotic filtering) and diverged when this constraint is released (biotic filtering). 3. Species richness of both taxa followed the same bell-shaped pattern along the gradient, while a similar significant pattern of functional richness was only observed for plants. Further analyses revealed a progressive shift from trait convergence to divergence for plants, but not for Collembola, as constraints intensity decreased. Instead, our results highlighted that Collembola traits were mainly linked to the variations in plant traits. This leads, within Collembola assemblages, to convergence of a subset of perception and habitat-related traits for which the relationship with plant traits was assessed. 4. Synthesis. Using a trait-based approach, our study highlighted that functional relationships occur between above-and below-ground compartments. We underlined that functional composition of plant communities plays a key role in structuring Collembola assemblages in addition to the role of abiotic variables. Our study clearly shows that functional diversity provides a new approach to link the above-and below-ground compartments and might, therefore, be further considered when studying ecological processes at the interface between both compartments.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0269-8463 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2091  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Sirot, C.; Gronkjaer, P.; Pedersen, J.B.; Panfili, J.; Zetina-Rejon, M.; Tripp-Valdez, A.; Ramos-Miranda, J.; Flores-Hernandez, D.; Sosa-Lopez, A.; Darnaude, A.M. doi  openurl
  Titre Using otolith organic matter to detect diet shifts in Bardiella chrysoura, during a period of environmental changes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 575 Numéro Pages 137-152  
  Mots-Clés aquatic ecosystems; Bairdiella chrysoura; climate-change; Coastal ecosystem; fish otoliths; food-web; movement patterns; prey availability; Stable isotope analysis; stable-isotope analysis; survival; temporal-changes; terminos lagoon; Trophic ecology; Trophic interactions  
  Résumé (up) Accurate knowledge on fish trophic ecology and its modifications is crucial for understanding the impact of global change on ecosystems. In this context, we investigated the value of the delta C-13 and delta N-15 of otolith soluble organic matter (SOM) for identifying temporal diet shifts in American silver perch Bairdiella chrysoura over a 30-yr period characterized by strong changes in its population size and habitats within the Terminos Lagoon (Mexico). We first compared the otolith SOM isotopic signatures from present-clay adults to those of muscle and the main local prey. Our results suggest that otolith SOM can be confidently extracted and analyzed for both present and past otoliths of this species. The mean otolith SOM signatures obtained (-15.92 +/- 1.35%, for delta C-13 and 9.38 +/- 0.93%, for delta N-15) were consistent with those of the diet as 85% of the individual signatures were included within the prey isotopic niche area. Moreover, this study supports a trophic enrichment factor between diet and otolith (TEFdiet-otolith) close to 0 for delta N-15, while for delta C-13, the TEFololith-muscle of +0.02% warrants further investigation. Then, we compared past and contemporary otolith SOM signatures to investigate temporal diet shifts in B. chrysoura. This showed that 613C and delta N-15 differed significantly between the past and present period even if the temporal shift remained relatively small (respectively +1.17%, and 0.55%). The present study substantiates the use of otolith SOM delta C-13 and delta N-15 as a proxy of fish present and past trophic position, opening the possibility for major progress in studies of temporal changes in food web ecology.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2172  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Maire, Eva; Grenouillet, G.; Brosse, S.; Villeger, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre How many dimensions are needed to accurately assess functional diversity? A pragmatic approach for assessing the quality of functional spaces Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography  
  Volume 24 Numéro 6 Pages 728-740  
  Mots-Clés Diversity indices; functional dendrogram; functional dissimilarity; functional ecology; functional traits; multidimensional space  
  Résumé (up) Aim Functional diversity is a key facet of biodiversity that is increasingly being measured to quantify its changes following disturbance and to understand its effects on ecosystem functioning. Assessing the functional diversity of assemblages based on species traits requires the building of a functional space (dendrogram or multidimensional space) where indices will be computed. However, there is still no consensus on the best method for measuring the quality of functional spaces. Innovation Here we propose a framework for evaluating the quality of a functional space (i.e. the extent to which it is a faithful representation of the initial functional trait values). Using simulated datasets, we analysed the influence of the number and type of functional traits used and of the number of species studied on the identity and quality of the best functional space. We also tested whether the quality of the functional space affects functional diversity patterns in local assemblages, using simulated datasets and a real study case. Main conclusions The quality of functional space strongly varied between situations. Spaces having at least four dimensions had the highest quality, while functional dendrograms and two-dimensional functional spaces always had a low quality. Importantly, we showed that using a poor-quality functional space could led to a biased assessment of functional diversity and false ecological conclusions. Therefore, we advise a pragmatic approach consisting of computing all the possible functional spaces and selecting the most parsimonious one.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1341  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
Tout Sélectionner    Désélectionner
 |   | 
Détails
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: