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Auteur Grenie, M.; Mouillot, D.; Villeger, S.; Denelle, P.; Tucker, C.M.; Munoz, F.; Violle, C. doi  openurl
  Titre Functional rarity of coral reef fishes at the global scale: Hotspots and challenges for conservation Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Biol. Conserv.  
  Volume 226 Numéro Pages 288-299  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; Biodiversity facet; Coral triangle; diversity; ecology; ecosystem processes; Evolutionary distinctiveness; Functional distinctiveness; Funrar; marine-protected areas; ocean acidification; redundancy; species richness; trait; vulnerability  
  Résumé Characterizing functional diversity has become central in ecological research and for biodiversity assessment. Understanding the role of species with rare traits, i.e. functionally rare species, in community assembly, ecosystem dynamics and functioning has recently gained momentum. However, functional rarity is still ignored in conservation strategies. Here, we quantified global functional and evolutionary rarity for 2073 species of coral reef fishes and compared the rarity values to IUCN Red List status. Most species were functionally common but geographically rare. However, we found very weak correlation between functional rarity and evolutionary rarity. Functional rarity was highest for species classified as not evaluated or threatened by the IUCN Red List. The location of functional rarity hotspots (Tropical Eastern Pacific) did not match hotspots of species richness and evolutionary distinctiveness (Indo-Australian Archipelago), nor the currently protected areas. We argue that functional rarity should be acknowledged for both species and site prioritization in conservation strategies.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0006-3207 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2434  
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Auteur Kadowaki, K.; Barbera, C.G.; Godsoe, W.; Delsuc, F.; Mouquet, N. doi  openurl
  Titre Predicting biotic interactions and their variability in a changing environment Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Biol. Lett.  
  Volume 12 Numéro 5 Pages 20151073  
  Mots-Clés Bacteria; climate-change; climate change; distribution models; diversity; extinction risk; global change; microcosm; phylogeny; predictive ecology; range; responses; shifts  
  Résumé Global environmental change is altering the patterns of biodiversity worldwide. Observation and theory suggest that species' distributions and abundances depend on a suite of processes, notably abiotic filtering and biotic interactions, both of which are constrained by species' phylogenetic history. Models predicting species distribution have historically mostly considered abiotic filtering and are only starting to integrate biotic interaction. However, using information on present interactions to forecast the future of biodiversity supposes that biotic interactions will not change when species are confronted with new environments. Using bacterial microcosms, we illustrate how biotic interactions can vary along an environmental gradient and how this variability can depend on the phylogenetic distance between interacting species.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1653  
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Auteur Mouquet, N.; Devictor, V.; Meynard, C.N.; Munoz, F.; Bersier, L.-F.; Chave, J.; Couteron, P.; Dalecky, A.; Fontaine, C.; Gravel, D.; Hardy, O.J.; Jabot, F.; Lavergne, S.; Leibold, M.; Mouillot, D.; Münkemüller, T.; Pavoine, S.; Prinzing, A.; Rodrigues, A.S.L.; Rohr, R.P.; Thébault, E.; Thuiller, W. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Ecophylogenetics: advances and perspectives Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Biological Reviews  
  Volume 87 Numéro 4 Pages 769-785  
  Mots-Clés community ecology; conservation biology; ecological networks; ecophylogenetics; Ecosystem functioning; evolution; phylogenetics  
  Résumé Ecophylogenetics can be viewed as an emerging fusion of ecology, biogeography and macroevolution. This new and fast-growing field is promoting the incorporation of evolution and historical contingencies into the ecological research agenda through the widespread use of phylogenetic data. Including phylogeny into ecological thinking represents an opportunity for biologists from different fields to collaborate and has provided promising avenues of research in both theoretical and empirical ecology, towards a better understanding of the assembly of communities, the functioning of ecosystems and their responses to environmental changes. The time is ripe to assess critically the extent to which the integration of phylogeny into these different fields of ecology has delivered on its promise. Here we review how phylogenetic information has been used to identify better the key components of species interactions with their biotic and abiotic environments, to determine the relationships between diversity and ecosystem functioning and ultimately to establish good management practices to protect overall biodiversity in the face of global change. We evaluate the relevance of information provided by phylogenies to ecologists, highlighting current potential weaknesses and needs for future developments. We suggest that despite the strong progress that has been made, a consistent unified framework is still missing to link local ecological dynamics to macroevolution. This is a necessary step in order to interpret observed phylogenetic patterns in a wider ecological context. Beyond the fundamental question of how evolutionary history contributes to shape communities, ecophylogenetics will help ecology to become a better integrative and predictive science.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1469-185x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 556  
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Auteur Chevrinais, M.; Jacquet, C.; Cloutier, R. doi  openurl
  Titre Early establishment of vertebrate trophic interactions: Food web structure in Middle to Late Devonian fish assemblages with exceptional fossilization Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Bull. Geosci.  
  Volume 92 Numéro 4 Pages 491-510  
  Mots-Clés north-america; bottom-up; body-size; predator; top-down; bottom-up control; coordinated stasis; Devonian; digestive contents; ecomorphology; escuminac formation; foraging ecology; fossil fish; fossil record; pahteoecology; prey size relationships; top-down control  
  Résumé In past and present ecosystems, trophic interactions determine material and energy transfers among species, regulating population dynamics and community stability. Food web studies in past ecosystems are helpful to assess the persistence of ecosystem structure throughout geological times and to explore the existence of general principles of food web assembly. We determined and compared the trophic structure of two Devonian fish assemblages [(1) the Escuminac assemblage (ca. 380 Ma), Miguasha, eastern Canada and (2) the Lode assemblage (ca. 390 Ma), Straupe, Latvia] with a closer look at the Escuminac assemblage. Both localities are representative of Middle to Late Devonian aquatic vertebrate assemblages in terms of taxonomic richness (ca. 20 species), phylogenetic diversity (all major groups of lower vertebrates) and palaeoenvironment (palaeoestuaries). Fossil food web structures were assessed using different kinds of direct (i.e. digestive contents and bite marks in fossils) and indirect (e.g. ecomoiphological measurements, stratigraphic species co-occurrences) indicators. First, the relationships between predator and prey body size established for the Escuminac fishes are comparable to those of recent aquatic ecosystems, highlighting a consistency of aquatic food web structure across geological time. Second, non-metric dimensional scaling on ecomorphological variables and cluster analysis showed a common pattern of functional groups for both fish assemblages; top predators, predators, primary and secondary consumers were identified. We conclude that Devonian communities were organized in multiple trophic levels and that size-based feeding interactions were established early in vertebrate history.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1214-1119 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2251  
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Auteur Pirog, A.; Blaison, A.; Jaquemet, S.; Soria, M.; Magalon, H. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Isolation and characterization of 20 microsatellite markers from Carcharhinus leucas (bull shark) and cross-amplification in Galeocerdo cuvier (tiger shark), Carcharhinus obscurus (dusky shark) and Carcharhinus plumbeus (sandbar shark) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée (up) Conservation Genet Resour  
  Volume 7 Numéro 1 Pages 121-124  
  Mots-Clés Animal Anatomy / Morphology / Histology; Bull shark; Carcharhinus leucas; Carcharhinus obscurus; Carcharhinus plumbeus; Conservation Biology/Ecology; Evolutionary Biology; Galeocerdo cuvier; Microsatellite; Plant Sciences  
  Résumé With the development of genetics methods, it becomes possible to study the population structure and some aspects of the reproductive behaviour of endangered sharks. Here we describe the isolation of 20 polymorphic microsatellite markers in the bull shark Carcharhinus leucas (Carcharhinidae) and their characteristics. Two to 10 alleles per locus were detected. Observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.00 to 0.78 and from 0.05 to 0.80, respectively. Four markers showed deviations from Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium; among them, three showed presence of null alleles. No linkage disequilibrium was detected among any of the loci. Moreover, four, 11 and 19 of these 20 markers successfully cross-amplified in the tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier, the sandbar shark Carcharhinus plumbeus and the dusky shark Carcharhinus obscurus, respectively.  
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  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1877-7252, 1877-7260 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1260  
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