|   | 
Détails
   web
Enregistrements
Auteur (up) Ayon, P.; Swartzman, G.; Espinoza, P.; Bertrand, A.
Titre Long-term changes in zooplankton size distribution in the Peruvian Humboldt Current System : conditions favouring sardine or anchovy Type Article scientifique
Année 2011 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Ecology. Progress Series
Volume 422 Numéro Pages 211-222
Mots-Clés abundance; anchovy; Current; dominance; energetics; Euphausiids; Feeding; Humboldt; Sardine; size; System; Zooplankton
Résumé Changes in the size distribution of zooplankton in the Humboldt Current System have been hypothesized to underlie observed changes in sardine and anchovy populations, the dominant pelagic fish species. To examine this hypothesis, the size distribution of over 15 000 zooplankton data samples collected since the 1960s was qualitatively determined. Dominance of each size group of zooplankton (small, medium and large) and of euphausiids was modelled using generalized additive models as a function of year, latitude, time of day, distance from the 200 m isobath (a surrogate for on-shelf versus off-shelf), sea surface temperature and salinity. The temporal (yr) pattern for euphausiid dominance was highly cross-correlated (i.e. was in phase) with the time series for estimated biomass of anchovy, and small zooplankton dominance with that for estimated sardine biomass. This supports the focal hypothesis based on feeding-energetic experiments, which showed energetic advantages to sardine filter feeding on smaller zooplankton and to anchovy bite feeding on larger copepods and euphausiids. Although euphausiids predominate offshore from the shelf break, anchovy biomass is generally highest on the shelf, suggesting a possible mismatch between anchovy feeding and euphausiid dominance. However, evidence concerning the offshore expansion of the anchovy range in cooler conditions, where both anchovy and euphausiids predominate, somewhat alleviates this apparent contradiction. A strong diel component to euphausiids and large zooplankton indicated diel migration for these zooplankton groups. That anchovy will preferentially eat euphausiids when they are more available (i.e. during the night and offshore) is supported by anchovy diet data.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 117
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur (up) de Verdal, H.; O'Connell, C.M.; Mekkawy, W.; Vandeputte, M.; Chatain, B.; Begout, M.-L.; Benzie, J.A.H.
Titre Agonistic behaviour and feed efficiency in juvenile Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquaculture
Volume 505 Numéro Pages 271-279
Mots-Clés Agonstic behaviour; arctic charr; atlantic salmon; brain serotonergic activity; brown trout; conversion ratio; Correlation; dominance relationships; Feed efficiency; food acquisition; genetic-improvement; Nile tilapia; Performances; salvelinus-alpinus; social-status
Résumé Given the strong effects of behavioural hierarchies on growth in many cultured species and the key role of feed efficiency in aquaculture economics, understanding the nature of the interaction of these variables is important for the sustainability of aquaculture. The relationship between agonistic behaviour, growth and feed efficiency in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, was studied by rearing 120 fish in eight aquaria. Fish were video-recorded to estimate the occurrence of agonistic behaviour during a fasting and a refeeding period. Growth, feed intake and feed conversion efficiency (FCE – calculated as the inverse of feed conversion ratio (FCR)) were subsequently measured individually for each fish. Fish showed 58% less agonistic traits during the fasting period compared to the feeding period, but generally, an aggressive fish during the fasting period was also aggressive during the refeeding period. The nature of agonistic behaviours between individuals was used to assess the presence of hierarchical relationships between fish. There were dominance hierarchies established in each experimental aquarium that despite minor shifts were maintained throughout the experiment. Agonistic behaviours were strongly correlated with each other, the aggression Index (AI) and with hierarchy rank. PCA analysis of the agonistic behaviours summarising the behavioural information showed little or no correlation between agonistic behaviour, fish growth or FCE. FCE was correlated with body weight gain (BWG). These results suggest that agonistic interactions in juvenile Nile tilapia do not have a large impact on growth and feed conversion efficiency.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0044-8486 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2583
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur (up) Escalas, A.; Catherine, A.; Maloufi, S.; Cellamare, M.; Hamlaoui, S.; Yepremian, C.; Louvard, C.; Troussellier, M.; Bernard, C.
Titre Drivers and ecological consequences of dominance in periurban phytoplankton communities using networks approaches Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Water Res.
Volume 163 Numéro Pages Unsp-114893
Mots-Clés blooms; climate-change; Co-occurrence network; Community cohesion; Community functioning; cooccurrence patterns; cyanobacteria dominance; diversity; Dominance; fresh-waters; lakes; light; Periurban waterbodies; Phytoplankton; resource use efficiency; species richness
Résumé Evaluating the causes and consequences of dominance by a limited number of taxa in phytoplankton communities is of huge importance in the current context of increasing anthropogenic pressures on natural ecosystems. This is of particular concern in densely populated urban areas where usages and impacts of human populations on water ecosystems are strongly interconnected. Microbial biodiversity is commonly used as a bioindicator of environmental quality and ecosystem functioning, but there are few studies at the regional scale that integrate the drivers of dominance in phytoplankton communities and their consequences on the structure and functioning of these communities. Here, we studied the causes and consequences of phytoplankton dominance in 50 environmentally contrasted waterbodies, sampled over four summer campaigns in the highly-populated Ile-de-France region (IDF). Phytoplankton dominance was observed in 32-52% of the communities and most cases were attributed to Chlorophyta (35.5-40.6% of cases) and Cyanobacteria (30.3-36.5%). The best predictors of dominance were identified using multinomial logistic regression and included waterbody features (surface, depth and connection to the hydrological network) and water column characteristics (total N, TN:TP ratio, water temperature and stratification). The consequences of dominance were dependent on the identity of the dominant organisms and included modifications of biological attributes (richness, cohesion) and functioning (biomass, RUE) of phytoplankton communities. We constructed co-occurrence networks using high resolution phytoplankton biomass and demonstrated that networks under dominance by Chlorophyta and Cyanobacteria exhibited significantly different structure compared with networks without dominance. Furthermore, dominance by Cyanobacteria was associated with more profound network modifications (e.g. cohesion, size, density, efficiency and proportion of negative links), suggesting a stronger disruption of the structure and functioning of phytoplankton communities in the conditions in which this group dominates. Finally, we provide a synthesis on the relationships between environmental drivers, dominance status, community attributes and network structure. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0043-1354 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000483006400038 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2636
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur (up) Escalle, L.; Gaertner, D.; Chavance, P.; Murua, H.; Simier, M.; Jose Pascual-Alayon, P.; Menard, F.; Ruiz, J.; Abascal, F.; Mérigot, B.
Titre Catch and bycatch captured by tropical tuna purse-seine fishery in whale and whale shark associated sets: comparison with free school and FAD sets Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Biodivers. Conserv.
Volume 28 Numéro 2 Pages 467-499
Mots-Clés diversity; mortality; atlantic; biology; Bycatch; strategies; Megafauna; behavior; dominance; yellowfin; Catch composition; Diversity; Ecosystem approach to fisheries management; swimming speeds; Tuna purse-seine fishery
Résumé In an ecosystem approach to fisheries management (EAFM) framework of the tuna purse-seine fishery, the assessment of target species, but also that of bycatch species, is essential. In the Atlantic and Indian oceans, purse-seine nets are sometimes set around tuna schools associated with whale sharks and baleen whales, although less frequently than around free-swimming tuna schools or those associated with fish aggregating devices (FAD). However, knowledge on the targeted catch and bycatch in these megafauna associated fishing sets is still relatively limited. Therefore, the aims of this study were to assess species and size composition of the target tuna species, as well as the diversity of bycatch species in whale and whale shark associated sets. Whale associated sets were found to be very similar to free school sets in terms of tuna catch (large yellowfin tuna), bycatch occurrence (presence in half the sets) and species assemblage (alpha and beta diversity). Whale shark associated sets were intermediate between FAD and free school sets, with tuna catch (skipjack and juvenile yellowfin) closer to FAD than to free school sets. However, the presence of large yellowfin, the bycatch composition (with almost no finfish, abundantly captured in FAD sets) and the species assemblage showed similarity with free school sets. This study highlights the need for an EAFM in the tuna purse-seine fishery by providing knowledge on pelagic multi-specific catches and bycatches.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0960-3115 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2482
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur (up) Kelly, N.; Cousens, R.D.; Taghizadeh, M.S.; Hanan, J.S.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Plants as populations of release sites for seed dispersal: a structural-statistical analysis of the effects of competition on Raphanus raphanistrum Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Ecol.
Volume 101 Numéro 4 Pages 878-888
Mots-Clés apical dominance; binary topological trees; canopy; density; dispersal; environments; fruit; invasive plant; long-distance dispersal; mechanistic model; plant architecture; propagule; seed; seed dispersal; shadow; wild radish; wind dispersal
Résumé Trajectories of dispersing seeds begin at the positions of their fruits on the maternal plant. Mechanistic simulation models usually assume that seed release is restricted to a characteristic, species-specific height. However, real canopies constitute distributed rather than point sources, which may have important consequences for dispersal kernels. Fruit positions are determined by plant architecture, which is under both genetic control and environmental influence. Competition with other plants has a major modifying influence on canopy structure. We used quantitative methods to describe the positions of fruits on plants of Raphanus raphanistrum L., examined how fruit spatial distributions change when plants grow under interspecific competition and explored how this is related to changes in the structural geometry and topology of the plant. Raphanus raphanistrum was grown either as individual plants or in a wheat crop. Branching structures and fruit positions were captured using a three-dimensional digitizer. Propagule locations were also mapped on the ground after dispersal. Fruit distributions pre-dispersal were analysed using various statistical approaches; plant topological and geometrical indices were calculated for the branching structures. Plants grown under competition were smaller, but the reduced size was because fewer modules were produced rather than because individual branches were in some way different. The distribution of these branches was also different under competition, with more apical dominance resulting in less branching along dominant modules. Under competition, fruits were concentrated in the upper parts of the canopy and closer, in the horizontal plane, to the base of the plant. This resulted in much more restricted local seed shadows post-dispersal. Synthesis. The effect of competition on plant size is primarily a result of a reduction in initiation of branches. For species with limited dispersal ability, this results in a greatly modified seed shadow at short distances. In the case of agricultural weeds, the concentration of fruits at greater heights when competing with a crop might result in a greater proportion being dispersed long distances by harvesting machinery, but they would be fewer in number.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0022-0477 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 774
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement