|   | 
Détails
   web
Enregistrements
Auteur McLean, M.; Auber, A.; Graham, N.A.J.; Houk, P.; Villeger, S.; Violle, C.; Thuiller, W.; Wilson, S.K.; Mouillot, D.
Titre Trait structure and redundancy determine sensitivity to disturbance in marine fish communities Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Change Biol.
Volume 25 Numéro 10 Pages 3424-3437
Mots-Clés biodiversity; climate change; climate-change; coral reefs; coral-reef fish; diversity stability; ecological traits; ecosystem functioning; ecosystem productivity; egg buoyancy; English Channel; functional diversity; functional redundancy; north-sea; regime shifts; response diversity; vulnerability
Résumé Trait diversity is believed to influence ecosystem dynamics through links between organismal traits and ecosystem processes. Theory predicts that key traits and high trait redundancy-large species richness and abundance supporting the same traits-can buffer communities against environmental disturbances. While experiments and data from simple ecological systems lend support, large-scale evidence from diverse, natural systems under major disturbance is lacking. Here, using long-term data from both temperate (English Channel) and tropical (Seychelles Islands) fishes, we show that sensitivity to disturbance depends on communities' initial trait structure and initial trait redundancy. In both ecosystems, we found that increasing dominance by climatically vulnerable traits (e.g., small, fast-growing pelagics/corallivores) rendered fish communities more sensitive to environmental change, while communities with higher trait redundancy were more resistant. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the influence of trait structure and redundancy on community sensitivity over large temporal and spatial scales in natural systems. Our results exemplify a consistent link between biological structure and community sensitivity that may be transferable across ecosystems and taxa and could help anticipate future disturbance impacts on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1354-1013 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000486150200018 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2652
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur McLean, M.; Mouillot, D.; Villeger, S.; Graham, N.A.J.; Auber, A.
Titre Interspecific differences in environmental response blur trait dynamics in classic statistical analyses Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Biol.
Volume 166 Numéro 12 Pages 152
Mots-Clés climate-change; community composition; ecology; framework; functional diversity; impact; rules
Résumé Trait-based ecology strives to better understand how species, through their bio-ecological traits, respond to environmental changes, and influence ecosystem functioning. Identifying which traits are most responsive to environmental changes can provide insight for understanding community structuring and developing sustainable management practices. However, misinterpretations are possible, because standard statistical methods (e.g., principal component analysis and linear regression) for identifying and ranking the responses of different traits to environmental changes ignore interspecific differences. Here, using both artificial data and real-world examples from marine fish communities, we show how considering species-specific responses can lead to drastically different results than standard community-level methods. By demonstrating the potential impacts of interspecific differences on trait dynamics, we illuminate a major, yet rarely discussed issue, highlighting how analytical misinterpretations can confound our basic understanding of trait responses, which could have important consequences for biodiversity conservation.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0025-3162 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000496131000001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2660
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Durant, J.M.; Molinero, J.-C.; Ottersen, G.; Reygondeau, G.; Stige, L.C.; Langangen, O.
Titre Contrasting effects of rising temperatures on trophic interactions in marine ecosystems Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep
Volume 9 Numéro Pages 15213
Mots-Clés biodiversity; calanus-finmarchicus; climate-change; fluctuations; life-history; mallotus-villosus; match; mismatch; phenology; thermal tolerance
Résumé In high-latitude marine environments, primary producers and their consumers show seasonal peaks of abundance in response to annual light cycle, water column stability and nutrient availability. Predatory species have adapted to this pattern by synchronising life-history events such as reproduction with prey availability. However, changing temperatures may pose unprecedented challenges by decoupling the predator-prey interactions. Here we build a predator-prey model accounting for the full life-cycle of fish and zooplankton including their phenology. The model assumes that fish production is bottom-up controlled by zooplankton prey abundance and match or mismatch between predator and prey phenology, and is parameterised based on empirical findings of how climate influences phenology and prey abundance. With this model, we project possible climate-warming effects on match-mismatch dynamics in Arcto-boreal and temperate biomes. We find a strong dependence on synchrony with zooplankton prey in the Arcto-boreal fish population, pointing towards a possible pronounced population decline with warming because of frequent desynchronization with its zooplankton prey. In contrast, the temperate fish population appears better able to track changes in prey timing and hence avoid strong population decline. These results underline that climate change may enhance the risks of predator-prey seasonal asynchrony and fish population declines at higher latitudes.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000491859500003 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2668
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Almoussawi, A.; Lenoir, J.; Jamoneau, A.; Hattab, T.; Wasof, S.; Gallet-Moron, E.; Garzon-Lopez, C.X.; Spicher, F.; Kobaissi, A.; Decocq, G.
Titre Forest fragmentation shapes the alpha-gamma relationship in plant diversity Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Veg. Sci.
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés agricultural landscapes; alpha diversity; anthropogenic disturbances; assemblages; community assembly; community patterns; competition; connectivity; dispersal limitations; gamma diversity; habitat conservation strategies; habitat fragmentation; local-regional richness relationship; metacommunity dynamics; regional species richness; relative importance; saturation; specialists; succession
Résumé Questions Forest fragmentation affects biodiversity locally (alpha diversity) and beyond – at relatively larger scales (gamma diversity) – by increasing dispersal and recruitment limitations. Yet, does an increase in fragmentation affect the relationship between alpha and gamma diversity and what can we learn from it? Location Northern France. Methods We surveyed 116 forest patches across three fragmentation levels: none (continuous forest); intermediate (forest patches connected by hedgerows); and high (isolated forest patches). Plant species richness of both forest specialists and generalists was surveyed at five nested spatial resolutions across each forest patch: 1 m(2); 10 m(2); 100 m(2); 1,000 m(2); and total forest patch area. First, we ran log-ratio models to quantify the alpha-gamma relationship. We did that separately for all possible combinations of fragmentation level (none vs intermediate vs high) x spatial scale (e.g., alpha-1 m(2) vs gamma-10 m(2)) x species type (e.g., alpha-specialists vs gamma-specialists). We then used linear mixed-effects models to analyze the effect of fragmentation level, spatial scale, species type and all two-way interaction terms on the slope coefficient extracted from all log-ratio models. Results We found an interaction effect between fragmentation level and species type, such that forest specialists shifted from a linear (i.e., proportional sampling) to a curvilinear plateau (i.e., community saturation) relationship at low and high fragmentation, respectively, while generalists shifted from a curvilinear to a linear pattern. Conclusions The impact of forest fragmentation on the alpha-gamma relationship supports generalist species persistence over forest specialists, with contrasting mechanisms for these two guilds. As fragmentation increases, forest specialists shift from proportional sampling towards community saturation, thus reducing alpha diversity likely due to dispersal limitation. Contrariwise, generalists shift from community saturation towards proportional sampling, thus increasing alpha diversity likely due to an increase in the edge:core ratio. To ensure long-term conservation of forest specialists, one single large forest patch should be preferred over several small ones.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1100-9233 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000493723100001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2676
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Kermagoret, C.; Claudet, J.; Derolez, V.; Nugues, M.M.; Ouisse, V.; Quillien, N.; Bailly, D.
Titre Dataset on marine ecosystem services supplied by coral reefs, sandy beaches and coastal lagoons in different eutrophication states Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Data Brief
Volume 25 Numéro Pages 104078
Mots-Clés dinoflagellate; Ecosystem services; Eutrophication; Marine biodiversity; Marine ecosystems; patterns
Résumé This data article provides indicators of Ecosystem Service (ES) supply for coral reefs, sandy beaches and coastal lagoons in different ecological states regarding eutrophication. 14 ES are considered: food through fisheries; material; molecules; coastal protection; nutrient regulation; pathogen regulation; climate regulation; support of recreational and leisure activities; contribution to a pleasant landscape; contribution to culture and territorial identity; emblematic biodiversity; habitat; trophic networks; recruitment. For each ecosystem 3 to 4 eutrophication states are described. Indicators of ES supply are filled on the basis of a literature review supplemented with expert-knowledge. A semi-quantification of the indicator value is finally provided. Tendencies and trade-offs between ES are analyzed in How does eutrophication impact bundles of ecosystem services in multiple coastal habitats using state-and-transition models [1]. (c) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.
Adresse
Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2352-3409 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000495104500105 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2680
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement