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Auteur Hill, S.L.; Hinke, J.; Bertrand, S.; Fritz, L.; Furness, R.W.; Ianelli, J.N.; Murphy, M.; Oliveros‐Ramos, R.; Pichegru, L.; Sharp, R.; Stillman, R.A.; Wright, P.J.; Ratcliffe, N.
Titre Reference points for predators will progress ecosystem-based management of fisheries Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Fish and Fisheries
Volume 21 Numéro 2 Pages 368-378
Mots-Clés adaptive management; Aichi Biodiversity Targets; ecosystem interactions; indirect impacts; management strategy; precautionary approach
Résumé Ecosystem-based management of fisheries aims to allow sustainable use of fished stocks while keeping impacts upon ecosystems within safe ecological limits. Both the FAO Code of Conduct for Responsible Fisheries and the Aichi Biodiversity Targets promote these aims. We evaluate implementation of ecosystem-based management in six case-study fisheries in which potential indirect impacts upon bird or mammal predators of fished stocks are well publicized and well studied. In particular, we consider the components needed to enable management strategies to respond to information from predator monitoring. Although such information is available in all case-studies, only one has a reference point defining safe ecological limits for predators and none has a method to adjust fishing activities in response to estimates of the state of the predator population. Reference points for predators have been developed outside the fisheries management context, but adoption by fisheries managers is hindered a lack of clarity about management objectives and uncertainty about how fishing affects predator dynamics. This also hinders the development of adjustment methods because these generally require information on the state of ecosystem variables relative to reference points. Nonetheless, most of the case-studies include precautionary measures to limit impacts on predators. These measures are not used tactically and therefore risk excessive restrictions on sustainable use. Adoption of predator reference points to inform tactical adjustment of precautionary measures would be an appropriate next step towards ecosystem-based management.
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Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1467-2979 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000505754400001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2684
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Auteur Lacoste, E.; McKindsey, C.W.; Archambault, P.
Titre Biodiversity–Ecosystem Functioning (BEF) approach to further understanding aquaculture–environment interactions with application to bivalve culture and benthic ecosystems Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Reviews in Aquaculture
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés aquaculture–environment interactions; benthic system; biodiversity; ecosystem functioning; shellfish
Résumé Coastal benthic ecosystems may be impacted by numerous human activities, including aquaculture, which continues to expand rapidly. Indeed, today aquaculture worldwide provides more biomass for human consumption than do wild fisheries. This rapid development raises questions about the interactions the practice has with the surrounding environment. In order to design strategies of sustainable ecosystem exploitation and marine spatial planning, a better understanding of coastal ecosystem functioning is needed so that tools to quantify impacts of human activities, including aquaculture, may be developed. To achieve this goal, some possible directions proposed are integrated studies leading to new concepts, model development based on these concepts and comparisons of various ecosystems on a global scale. This review draws on existing literature to (i) briefly summarize the major ecological interactions between off-bottom shellfish aquaculture and the environment, (ii) introduce research on the influence of benthic diversity on ecosystem functioning (BEF relationships) and (iii) propose a holistic approach to conduct aquaculture–environment studies using a BEF approach, highlighting the need for integrated studies that could offer insights and perspectives to guide future research efforts and improve the environmental management of aquaculture.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1753-5131 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000514024900001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2720
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Auteur Galès, A.; Triplet, S.; Geoffroy, T.; Roques, C.; Carré, C.; Le Floc’h, E.; Lanfranchi, M.; Simier, M.; Roque d’Orbcastel, E.; Przybyla, C.; Fouilland, E.
Titre Control of the pH for marine microalgae polycultures: A key point for CO2 fixation improvement in intensive cultures Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of CO2 Utilization
Volume 38 Numéro Pages 187-193
Mots-Clés Carbon yield; Microalgal diversity; pH; Predators
Résumé Recently, CO2 recycling for the production of valuable microalgae has acquired substantial interest. Most studies investigating CO2 conversion efficiency in algal cultures were based on single species, although a stabilising effect of algal diversity on biomass production was recently highlighted. However, addition of CO2 into polyalgal cultures requires a careful control of pH; performance of CO2 conversion, growth and carbon biomass production are affected by pH differently, depending on the species of microalgae. This study investigates the efficiency of CO2 conversion by natural marine algal assemblage cultivated in open, land-based raceways (4.5 m3, 10 m2), working as high rate algal ponds (HRAP). Ponds were enriched with nitrogen and phosphate, pure CO2 was added and algal cultures were grown under three different fixed pH levels: pH 6, 7 and 8. The highest conversion of photosynthetically fixed CO2 into carbon biomass (40 %) was reached at pH 7, an intermediate level, due to the partial CO2 asphyxiation of algal predators (copepods, ciliates), while being under the suboptimal conditions for the development of marine amoebae. Under this pH, the theoretical maximal biological conversion of available CO2 into carbon biomass was estimated to be 60 % in naturally inoculated open ponds.
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Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2212-9820 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2727
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Auteur Delrieu‐Trottin, E.; Durand, J.-D.; Limmon, G.; Sukmono, T.; Kadarusman; Sugeha, H.Y.; Chen, W.-J.; Busson, F.; Borsa, P.; Dahruddin, H.; Sauri, S.; Fitriana, Y.; Zein, M.S.A.; Hocdé, R.; Pouyaud, L.; Keith, P.; Wowor, D.; Steinke, D.; Hanner, R.; Hubert, N.
Titre Biodiversity inventory of the grey mullets (Actinopterygii: Mugilidae) of the Indo-Australian Archipelago through the iterative use of DNA-based species delimitation and specimen assignment methods Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Evolutionary Applications
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés Coral Triangle; cryptic diversity; DNA barcoding; reference library; taxonomic gap
Résumé DNA barcoding opens new perspectives on the way we document biodiversity. Initially proposed to circumvent the limits of morphological characters to assign unknown individuals to known species, DNA barcoding has been used in a wide array of studies where collecting species identity constitutes a crucial step. The assignment of unknowns to knowns assumes that species are already well identified and delineated, making the assignment performed reliable. Here, we used DNA-based species delimitation and specimen assignment methods iteratively to tackle the inventory of the Indo-Australian Archipelago grey mullets, a notorious case of taxonomic complexity that requires DNA-based identification methods considering that traditional morphological identifications are usually not repeatable and sequence mislabeling is common in international sequence repositories. We first revisited a DNA barcode reference library available at the global scale for Mugilidae through different DNA-based species delimitation methods to produce a robust consensus scheme of species delineation. We then used this curated library to assign unknown specimens collected throughout the Indo-Australian Archipelago to known species. A second iteration of OTU delimitation and specimen assignment was then performed. We show the benefits of using species delimitation and specimen assignment methods iteratively to improve the accuracy of specimen identification and propose a workflow to do so.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1752-4571 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2729
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Auteur Jeliazkov, A.; Mijatovic, D.; Chantepie, S.; Andrew, N.; Arlettaz, R.; Barbaro, L.; Barsoum, N.; Bartonova, A.; Belskaya, E.; Bonada, N.; Brind'Amour, A.; Carvalho, R.; Castro, H.; Chmura, D.; Choler, P.; Chong-Seng, K.; Cleary, D.; Cormont, A.; Cornwell, W.; de Campos, R.; de Voogd, N.; Doledec, S.; Drew, J.; Dziock, F.; Eallonardo, A.; Edgar, M.J.; Farneda, F.; Flores Hernandez, D.; Frenette-Dussault, C.; Fried, G.; Gallardo, B.; Gibb, H.; Goncalves-Souza, T.; Higuti, J.; Humbert, J.-Y.; Krasnov, B.R.; Le Saux, E.; Lindo, Z.; Lopez-Baucells, A.; Lowe, E.; Marteinsdottir, B.; Martens, K.; Meffert, P.; Mellado-Diaz, A.; Menz, M.H.M.; Meyer, C.F.J.; Ramos Miranda, J.; Mouillot, D.; Ossola, A.; Pakeman, R.; Pavoine, S.; Pekin, B.; Pino, J.; Pocheville, A.; Pomati, F.; Poschlod, P.; Prentice, H.C.; Purschke, O.; Raevel, V.; Reitalu, T.; Renema, W.; Ribera, I.; Robinson, N.; Robroek, B.; Rocha, R.; Shieh, S.-H.; Spake, R.; Staniaszek-Kik, M.; Stanko, M.; Tejerina-Garro, F.L.; ter Braak, C.; Urban, M.C.; van Klink, R.; Villeger, S.; Wegman, R.; Westgate, M.J.; Wolff, J.; Zarnowiec, J.; Zolotarev, M.; Chase, J.M.
Titre A global database for metacommunity ecology, integrating species, traits, environment and space Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Data
Volume 7 Numéro 1 Pages 6
Mots-Clés biodiversity; biological traits; community structure; diversity; life-history traits; models; plant functional traits; responses; spermonde-archipelago; variables
Résumé The use of functional information in the form of species traits plays an important role in explaining biodiversity patterns and responses to environmental changes. Although relationships between species composition, their traits, and the environment have been extensively studied on a case-by-case basis, results are variable, and it remains unclear how generalizable these relationships are across ecosystems, taxa and spatial scales. To address this gap, we collated 80 datasets from trait-based studies into a global database for metaCommunity Ecology: Species, Traits, Environment and Space; “CESTES”. Each dataset includes four matrices: species community abundances or presences/absences across multiple sites, species trait information, environmental variables and spatial coordinates of the sampling sites. The CESTES database is a live database: it will be maintained and expanded in the future as new datasets become available. By its harmonized structure, and the diversity of ecosystem types, taxonomic groups, and spatial scales it covers, the CESTES database provides an important opportunity for synthetic trait-based research in community ecology.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000511432600001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2736
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