bascule de visibilité Search & Display Options

Tout Sélectionner    Désélectionner
 |   | 
Détails
   print
  Enregistrements Liens
Auteur Mazel, F.; Pennell, M.W.; Cadotte, M.W.; Diaz, S.; Dalla Riva, G.V.; Grenyer, R.; Leprieur, F.; Mooers, A.O.; Mouillot, D.; Tucker, C.M.; Pearse, W.D. doi  openurl
  Titre Prioritizing phylogenetic diversity captures functional diversity unreliably Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Nat. Commun.  
  Volume 9 Numéro Pages 2888  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; conservation priorities; dependence; ecosystems; global patterns; gradients; hotspots; mammals; plant traits; species richness  
  Résumé In the face of the biodiversity crisis, it is argued that we should prioritize species in order to capture high functional diversity (FD). Because species traits often reflect shared evolutionary history, many researchers have assumed that maximizing phylogenetic diversity (PD) should indirectly capture FD, a hypothesis that we name the “phylogenetic gambit”. Here, we empirically test this gambit using data on ecologically relevant traits from >15,000 vertebrate species. Specifically, we estimate a measure of surrogacy of PD for FD. We find that maximizing PD results in an average gain of 18% of FD relative to random choice. However, this average gain obscures the fact that in over one-third of the comparisons, maximum PD sets contain less FD than randomly chosen sets of species. These results suggest that, while maximizing PD protection can help to protect FD, it represents a risky conservation strategy.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2041-1723 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2396  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Wasof, S.; Lenoir, J.; Hattab, T.; Jamoneau, A.; Gallet-Moron, E.; Ampoorter, E.; Saguez, R.; Bennsadek, L.; Bertrand, R.; Valdes, A.; Verheyen, K.; Decocq, G. doi  openurl
  Titre Dominance of individual plant species is more important than diversity in explaining plant biomass in the forest understorey Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée J. Veg. Sci.  
  Volume 29 Numéro 3 Pages 521-531  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; biomass; biomass ratio hypothesis; community biomass; current knowledge; deciduous forests; ecosystem productivity; forest understorey; functional diversity; ivy; multiple traits; niche conservatism; phylogenetic diversity; phylogeny; production; richness  
  Résumé QuestionsHow does plant community diversity influence variation in plant biomass? There are two competing hypotheses: the biomass ratio' hypothesis, where biomass is influenced by the abundance and traits of the most dominant species, and the diversity' hypothesis, where the diversity of organisms influences biomass through mechanisms such as niche complementarity. However, no studies have tested which one of these two hypotheses better explains the variation in plant biomass in the forest understorey. LocationTemperate deciduous forests in northern France. MethodsFor the forest understorey, we assessed species diversity and biomass as well as soil and light conditions in 133 forest plots of 100m(2) each. Using mixed-effect models and after controlling for potential confounding factors, we tested the biomass ratio' hypothesis by relating the relative abundance of the most dominant species across our study sites and the CWM of plant traits (leaf area and plant height) to biomass. The diversity' hypothesis was tested by relating biomass to various measures of taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic diversity. ResultsBiomass of the forest understorey was mainly related to the relative abundance and the trait values of the most dominant species, supporting the biomass ratio' hypothesis. In contrast to the diversity' hypothesis, functional diversity indices had a negative impact on biomass. We found no contribution of taxonomic or phylogenetic diversity indices. ConclusionThe abundance and traits of the most dominant species matter more than taxonomic, functional or phylogenetic diversity of the forest understorey in explaining its biomass. Thus, there is a need for experiments that aim to fully understand keystone species' responses to on-going changing biotic and abiotic conditions and to predict their effects on ecosystem functioning and processes.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1100-9233 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2397  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Tribot, A.-S.; Deter, J.; Mouquet, N. doi  openurl
  Titre Integrating the aesthetic value of landscapes and biological diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.  
  Volume 285 Numéro 1886 Pages 20180971  
  Mots-Clés aesthetic value; biodiversity; conservation; ecological functioning; ecosystem services; increase; indicators; landscape ecology; perception; preferences; quality; species richness; urban green-space  
  Résumé As a cultural ecosystem service, the aesthetic value of landscapes contributes to human well-being, but studies linking biodiversity and ecosystem services generally do not account for this particular service. Therefore, congruence between the aesthetic perception of landscapes, ecological value and biodiversity remains poorly understood. Here, we describe the conceptual background, current methodologies and future challenges of assessing landscape aesthetics and its relationship with biodiversity. We highlight the methodological gaps between the assessment of landscape aesthetics, ecological diversity and functioning. We discuss the challenges associated with connecting landscape aesthetics with ecological value, and the scaling issues in the assessment of human aesthetics perception. To better integrate aesthetic value and ecological components of biodiversity, we propose to combine the study of aesthetics and the understanding of ecological function at both the species and landscape levels. Given the urgent need to engage society in conservation efforts, this approach, based on the combination of the aesthetic experience and the recognition of ecological functioning by the general public, will help change our culture of nature and promote ecologically oriented conservation policies.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2415  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Chiarello, M.; Auguet, J.-C.; Bettarel, Y.; Bouvier, C.; Claverie, T.; Graham, N.A.J.; Rieuvilleneuve, F.; Sucre, E.; Bouvier, T.; Villeger, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Skin microbiome of coral reef fish is highly variable and driven by host phylogeny and diet Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Microbiome  
  Volume 6 Numéro Pages 147  
  Mots-Clés bacterial communities; divergence; diversity; evolution; insights; life-history; Microbiota; mucus; patterns; Phylogenetic diversity; Phylogenetic signal; Phylosymbiosis; sequence data; Teleost; Tropical; vulnerability  
  Résumé Background: The surface of marine animals is covered by abundant and diversified microbial communities, which have major roles for the health of their host While such microbiomes have been deeply examined in marine invertebrates such as corals and sponges, the microbiomes living on marine vertebrates have received less attention. Specifically, the diversity of these microbiomes, their variability among species, and their drivers are still mostly unknown, especially among the fish species living on coral reefs that contribute to key ecosystem services while they are increasingly affected by human activities. Here, we investigated these knowledge gaps analyzing the skin microbiome of 138 fish individuals belonging to 44 coral reef fish species living in the same area. Results: Prokaryotic communities living on the skin of coral reef fishes are highly diverse, with on average more than 600 OTUs per fish, and differ from planktonic microbes. Skin microbiomes varied between fish individual and species, and interspecific differences were slightly coupled to the phylogenetic affiliation of the host and its ecological traits. Conclusions: These results highlight that coral reef biodiversity is greater than previously appreciated, since the high diversity of macro-organisms supports a highly diversified microbial community. This suggest that beyond the loss of coral reefs-associated macroscopic species, anthropic activities on coral reefs could also lead to a loss of still unexplored host-associated microbial diversity, which urgently needs to be assessed.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2049-2618 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2421  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
 

 
Auteur Magris, R.A.; Andrello, M.; Pressey, R.L.; Mouillot, D.; Dalongeville, A.; Jacobi, M.N.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Biologically representative and well-connected marine reserves enhance biodiversity persistence in conservation planning Type Article scientifique
  Année (down) 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Conserv. Lett.  
  Volume 11 Numéro 4 Pages Unsp-e12439  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity conservation; climate-change; coral-reefs; design; larval dispersal; marine protected areas; marine reserve design; networks; population connectivity; protected areas; spatial planning; spatial prioritization  
  Résumé Current methods in conservation planning for promoting the persistence of biodiversity typically focus on either representing species geographic distributions or maintaining connectivity between reserves, but rarely both, and take a focal species, rather than a multispecies, approach. Here, we link prioritization methods with population models to explore the impact of integrating both representation and connectivity into conservation planning for species persistence. Using data on 288 Mediterranean fish species with varying conservation requirements, we show that: (1) considering both representation and connectivity objectives provides the best strategy for enhanced biodiversity persistence and (2) connectivity objectives were fundamental to enhancing persistence of small-ranged species, which are most in need of conservation, while the representation objective benefited only wide-ranging species. Our approach provides a more comprehensive appraisal of planning applications than approaches focusing on either representation or connectivity, and will hopefully contribute to build more effective reserve networks for the persistence of biodiversity.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1755-263x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2423  
Lien permanent pour cet enregistrement
Tout Sélectionner    Désélectionner
 |   | 
Détails
   print

Save Citations:
Export Records: