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Auteur Du, X.; Deng, Y.; Li, S.; Escalas, A.; Feng, K.; He, Q.; Wang, Z.; Wu, Y.; Wang, D.; Peng, X.; Wang, S.
Titre Steeper spatial scaling patterns of subsoil microbiota are shaped by deterministic assembly process Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2021 Publication Revue Abrégée Mol. Ecol.
Volume 30 Numéro 4 Pages 1072-1085
Mots-Clés archaeal communities; assembly mechanism; beta-diversity; biodiversity; biogeography; climate-change; depth; distance decay; drivers; grassland; prokaryote; sequences; soil bacterial communities; spatial scaling; species-area relationship
Résumé Although many studies have investigated the spatial scaling of microbial communities living in surface soils, very little is known about the patterns within deeper strata, nor is the mechanism behind them. Here, we systematically assessed spatial scaling of prokaryotic biodiversity within three different strata (Upper: 0-20 cm, Middle: 20-40 cm, and Substratum: 40-100 cm) in a typical grassland by examining both distance-decay (DDRs) and species-area relationships (SARs), taxonomically and phylogenetically, as well as community assembly processes. Each layer exhibited significant biogeographic patterns in both DDR and SAR (p < .05), with taxonomic turnover rates higher than phylogenetic ones. Specifically, the spatial turnover rates, beta and z values, respectively, ranged from 0.016 +/- 0.005 to 0.023 +/- 0.005 and 0.065 +/- 0.002 to 0.077 +/- 0.004 across soil strata, and both increased with depth. Moreover, the prokaryotic community in grassland soils assembled mainly according to deterministic rather than stochastic mechanisms. By using normalized stochasticity ratio (NST) based on null model, the relative importance of deterministic ratios increased from 48.0 to 63.3% from Upper to Substratum, meanwhile a phylogenetic based method revealed average beta NTI also increased with depth, from -5.29 to 19.5. Using variation partitioning and distance approaches, both geographic distance and soil properties were found to strongly affect biodiversity structure, the proportions increasing with depth, but spatial distance was always the main underlying factor. These indicated increasingly deterministic proportions in accelerating turnover rates for spatial assembly of prokaryotic biodiversity. Our study provided new insights on biogeography in different strata, revealing importance of assembly patterns and mechanisms of prokaryote communities in below-surface soils.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0962-1083 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000601909000001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2963
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Auteur Gomes de Barros, M.J.; Eduardo, L.N.; Bertrand, A.; Lucena-Fredou, F.; Fredou, T.; Lira, A.S.; Ferreira, B.P.
Titre Bottom trawling on a carbonate shelf: Do we get what we see? Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2021 Publication Revue Abrégée Cont. Shelf Res.
Volume 213 Numéro Pages 104314
Mots-Clés artificial reefs; behavior; catch; catchability; Catchability; efficiency; fish; Fish; Fisheries; habitat; marine biodiversity; Northeast Brazil; Sponges; transects; Underwater footage; video
Résumé Bottom trawling is a common fisheries method and also a widespread scientific sampling method for benthic and demersal species. Selectivity and catchability are usually estimated using different meshes and studies with alternative methods are rare. In this study, to improve the estimation of trawl selectivity, we compare bottom trawl catches and recordings made by a camera fitted on the top of the net. Scientific trawling was conducted along the Northeast Brazilian shelf, a typical carbonate shelf with presence of sponges, coralline bottoms and a high water visibility. In total, 23 taxa (19 species and four genera) were identified in the videos and 30 taxa (25 species and five genera) in the trawls, indicating a higher potential of trawling to record species richness. Overall, no significant differences were observed in the assemblage structure identified by trawling and underwater footages. However, divergences were observed in fish catchability between trawls and videos. Net sampling was more selective for fish with low swimming capacity, while species with shelter and fast swimming capacity seemed to be underestimated. Furthermore, underwater footages allowed for an assessment of the trawling impacts on erect sponges with the observation of the damage on large branching and tubular sponges. The vulnerability of those habitats that concentrate higher fish diversity to mechanical impact raise the need for creation of preventive measures to protect these sensitive areas from commercial fishing operations. The use of less destructive methods is an important survey alternative under special conditions, particularly in conservation areas. In this study the videos could not be used as a complete alternative for the trawls, which presented higher efficiency, however, videos had shown to be a useful complement. Possibly, the speed and height determined by the trawling operation affected the performance of video sampling, being performed in suboptimal conditions. Using dedicated video sampling, such as towed video, could significantly improve its efficiency and compensate the disadvantages observed from the videos.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0278-4343 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000608405600004 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2985
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Auteur Nogues, Q.; Raoux, A.; Araignous, E.; Chaalali, A.; Hattab, T.; Leroy, B.; Lasram, F.B.R.; David, V.; Le Loc'h, F.; Dauvin, J.-C.; Niquil, N.
Titre Cumulative effects of marine renewable energy and climate change on ecosystem properties: Sensitivity of ecological network analysis Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2021 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Indic.
Volume 121 Numéro Pages 107128
Mots-Clés biodiversity; Cumulative impact; Ecological network analysis; ecopath; ENA food web; flow; food-web; indicators; Linear inverse modeling; management; Marine renewable energies; offshore wind farm; regime shifts; stability; stressors
Résumé In an increasingly anthropogenic world, the scientific community and managers have to take interactions between the drivers of ecosystems into consideration. Tools like ecological network analysis (ENA) indices offer the opportunity to study those interactions at the ecosystem level. However, ENA indices have never been used to test the incidence of cumulative drivers. The present study uses models combining the effects of (i) the reef caused by the future offshore wind farm of Courseulles-sur-Mer and (ii) climate change on species distribution, to test the response of multiple ENA indices. ENA indices proved sensitive to this cumulative impact, displaying a wide variety of cumulative effects. They were also very powerful to characterize the role of the cumulative impact on ecosystem functioning. These results demonstrate the capacity of ENA indices to describe and understand cumulative effects at the ecosystem scale. Using a sensitivity analysis approach, this study shows that ENA indices could be viable tools for managers. To help them in their tasks, the next step could be to link ecosystem services to ENA indices for a more practical use.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1470-160x ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000604891100004 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2989
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Auteur Stoeckel, S.; Porro, B.; Arnaud-Haond, S.
Titre The discernible and hidden effects of clonality on the genotypic and genetic states of populations: Improving our estimation of clonal rates Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2021 Publication Revue Abrégée Mol. Ecol. Resour.
Volume Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés F-statistics; genotypic diversity; population genetics; rates of clonality; sampling
Résumé Partial clonality is widespread across the tree of life, but most population genetic models are designed for exclusively clonal or sexual organisms. This gap hampers our understanding of the influence of clonality on evolutionary trajectories and the interpretation of population genetic data. We performed forward simulations of diploid populations at increasing rates of clonality (c), analysed their relationships with genotypic (clonal richness, R, and distribution of clonal sizes, Pareto beta) and genetic (F-IS and linkage disequilibrium) indices, and tested predictions of c from population genetic data through supervised machine learning. Two complementary behaviours emerged from the probability distributions of genotypic and genetic indices with increasing c. While the impact of c on R and Pareto beta was easily described by simple mathematical equations, its effects on genetic indices were noticeable only at the highest levels (c > 0.95). Consequently, genotypic indices allowed reliable estimates of c, while genetic descriptors led to poorer performances when c < 0.95. These results provide clear baseline expectations for genotypic and genetic diversity and dynamics under partial clonality. Worryingly, however, the use of realistic sample sizes to acquire empirical data systematically led to gross underestimates (often of one to two orders of magnitude) of c, suggesting that many interpretations hitherto proposed in the literature, mostly based on genotypic richness, should be reappraised. We propose future avenues to derive realistic confidence intervals for c and show that, although still approximate, a supervised learning method would greatly improve the estimation of c from population genetic data.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1755-098x ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000610842200001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2990
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Auteur Dittami, S.M.; Arboleda, E.; Auguet, J.-C.; Bigalke, A.; Briand, E.; Cardenas, P.; Cardini, U.; Decelle, J.; Engelen, A.H.; Eveillard, D.; Gachoni, C.M.M.; Griffiths, S.M.; Harder, T.; Kayal, E.; Kazamia, E.; Lathier, F.H.; Medina, M.; Marzinelli, E.M.; Morganti, T.M.; Pons, L.N.; Prado, S.; Pintado, J.; Saha, M.; selosse, M.-A.; Skillings, D.; Stock, W.; Sunagawa, S.; Toulza, E.; Vorobev, A.; Leblanc, C.; Not, F.
Titre A community perspective on the concept of marine holobionts: current status, challenges, and future directions Type Article scientifique
Année (down) 2021 Publication Revue Abrégée PeerJ
Volume 9 Numéro Pages e10911
Mots-Clés animals; bacterial interactions; coral-reef fish; diversity; Dysbiosis; ecology; Ecosystem services; evolution; Evolution; Host-microbiota interactions; Marine holobionts; microbiome; microorganisms; plant; symbiosis; Symbiosis
Résumé Host-microbe interactions play crucial roles in marine ecosystems. However, we still have very little understanding of the mechanisms that govern these relationships, the evolutionary processes that shape them, and their ecological consequences. The holobiont concept is a renewed paradigm in biology that can help to describe and understand these complex systems. It posits that a host and its associated microbiota with which it interacts, form a holobiont, and have to be studied together as a coherent biological and functional unit to understand its biology, ecology, and evolution. Here we discuss critical concepts and opportunities in marine holobiont research and identify key challenges in the field. We highlight the potential economic, sociological, and environmental impacts of the holobiont concept in marine biological, evolutionary, and environmental sciences. Given the connectivity and the unexplored biodiversity specific to marine ecosystems, a deeper understanding of such complex systems requires further technological and conceptual advances, e.g., the development of controlled experimental model systems for holobionts from all major lineages and the modeling of (info)chemical-mediated interactions between organisms. Here we propose that one significant challenge is to bridge cross-disciplinary research on tractable model systems in order to address key ecological and evolutionary questions. This first step is crucial to decipher the main drivers of the dynamics and evolution of holobionts and to account for the holobiont concept in applied areas, such as the conservation, management, and exploitation of marine ecosystems and resources, where practical solutions to predict and mitigate the impact of human activities are more important than ever.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2167-8359 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000621591900009 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2995
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