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Auteur Zhao, T.; Villeger, S.; Cucherousset, J.
Titre Accounting for intraspecific diversity when examining relationships between non-native species and functional diversity Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Oecologia
Volume (down) 189 Numéro 1 Pages 171-183
Mots-Clés fish; Intraspecific variability; size; disturbance; Non-native species; phenotypic plasticity; Functional diversity; reveals; catfish silurus-glanis; coexistence; Community assembly; energy relationships; Functional traits; success; trait variability
Résumé Quantifying changes in functional diversity, the facet of biodiversity accounting for the biological features of organisms, has been advocated as one of the most integrative ways to unravel how communities are affected by human-induced perturbations. The present study assessed how functional diversity patterns varied among communities that differed in the degree to which non-native species dominated the community in temperate lake fish communities and whether accounting for intraspecific functional variability could provide a better understanding of the variation of functional diversity across communities. Four functional diversity indices were computed for 18 temperate lake fish communities along a gradient of non-native fish dominance using morphological functional traits assessed for each life-stage within each species. First, we showed that intraspecific variability in functional traits was high and comparable to interspecific variability. Second, we found that non-native fish were functionally distinct from native fish. Finally, we demonstrated that there was a significant relationship between functional diversity and the degree to which non-native fish currently dominated the community and that this association could be better detected when accounting for intraspecific functional variability. These findings highlighted the importance of incorporating intraspecific variability to better quantify the variation of functional diversity patterns in communities facing human-induced perturbations.
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ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2479
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Auteur Chu, T.V.; Torréton, J.-P.; Mari, X.; Nguyen, H.M.T.; Pham, K.T.; Pham, T.T.; Bouvier, T.; Bettarel, Y.; Pringault, O.; Bouvier, C.; Rochelle-Newall, E.
Titre Nutrient ratios and the complex structure of phytoplankton communities in a highly turbid estuary of Southeast Asia Type Article scientifique
Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Environ Monit Assess
Volume (down) 186 Numéro 12 Pages 8555-8572
Mots-Clés Hab; Phytoplankton diversity; Southeast Asia; vietnam
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ISSN 0167-6369 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1161
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Auteur Marsac, F.; Galletti, F.; Ternon, J.-F.; Romanov, E.V.; Demarcq, H.; Corbari, L.; Bouchet, P.; Roest, W.R.; Jorry, S.J.; Olu, K.; Loncke, L.; Roberts, M.J.; Ménard, F.
Titre Seamounts, plateaus and governance issues in the southwestern Indian Ocean, with emphasis on fisheries management and marine conservation, using the Walters Shoal as a case study for implementing a protection framework Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography
Volume (down) 176 Numéro Pages 104715
Mots-Clés Amended Nairobi Convention; Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction; Benthic biodiversity; Deep-sea fisheries; Deep-sea mining; International Law of the Sea; Marine protected areas; Saya de Malha Bank; South Indian Ocean Fisheries Agreement; Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems
Résumé There is a growing interest in the management of seamounts of the Southwestern Indian Ocean (SWIO) both in waters under national jurisdictions and in the Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction (ABNJ). New scientific knowledge has been gathered through various oceanographic cruises during the past decade, and new agreements are under consideration globally to promote conservation and sustainable use of the biodiversity in the ABNJ, where the deep sea ecosystems associated with seamounts are a growing matter of concern. SWIO seamounts have attracted the interests of fishers since the 1960s, and contracts for mining exploration have been granted recently. Seamounts are known to shelter rich, fragile and poorly resilient ecosystems whose important ecological functions are threatened by various anthropogenic pressures. Whereas many seamounts and shoals are located in national waters, many others fall in the ABNJ, with no current legal status per se. To ensure conservation of their habitats and biodiversity, it is essential that protection measures are instigated under an internationally recognized legal and institutional framework. In this paper, we review the current state of such a framework relevant to seamounts, with emphasis on fisheries and conservation in the SWIO. An emblematic seamount, the Walters Shoal, is selected as a case study to discuss how it could become a fully-protected space in the ABNJ. As a large part of the SWIO is under the mandate of the Nairobi Convention (as a Regional Sea under the auspices of UNEP), guidelines are proposed to encourage dedicated seamount governance within the framework of this Convention.
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ISSN 0967-0645 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000556810400007 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2689
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Auteur Brouwer, G.M.; Duijnstee, I. a. P.; Hazeleger, J.H.; Rossi, F.; Lourens, L.J.; Middelburg, J.J.; Wolthers, M.
Titre Diet shifts and population dynamics of estuarine foraminifera during ecosystem recovery after experimentally induced hypoxia crises Type Article scientifique
Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci.
Volume (down) 170 Numéro Pages 20-33
Mots-Clés Bacteria; Benthic foraminifera; C-13 label; communities; Diet shifts; differential response; diversity; Hypoxia; in-situ; Intertidal; Macrofauna; Meiofauna; microphytobenthos carbon; population dynamics; Sediment
Résumé This study shows foraminiferal dynamics after experimentally induced hypoxia within the wider context of ecosystem recovery. C-13-labeled bicarbonate and glucose were added to the sediments to examine foraminiferal diet shifts during ecosystem recovery and test-size measurements were used to deduce population dynamics. Hypoxia-treated and undisturbed patches were compared to distinguish natural (seasonal) fluctuations from hypoxia-induced responses. The effect of timing of disturbance and duration of recovery were investigated. The foraminiferal diets and population dynamics showed higher fluctuations in the recovering patches compared to the controls. The foraminiferal diet and population structure of Haynesina germanica and Ammonia beccarii responded differentially and generally inversely to progressive stages of ecosystem recovery. Tracer inferred diet estimates in April and June and the two distinctly visible cohorts in the test-size distribution, discussed to reflect reproduction in June, strongly suggest that the ample availability of diatoms during the first month of ecosystem recovery after the winter hypoxia was likely profitable to A. beccarii. Enhanced reproduction itself was strongly linked to the subsequent dietary shift to bacteria. The distribution of the test dimensions of H. germanica indicated that this species had less fluctuation in population structure during ecosystem recovery but possibly reproduced in response to the induced winter hypoxia. Bacteria seemed to consistently contribute more to the diet of H. germanica than diatoms. For the diet and test-size distribution of both species, the timing of disturbance seemed to have a higher impact than the duration of the subsequent recovery period. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Ltd.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Médium
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2065
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Auteur McLean, M.; Mouillot, D.; Villeger, S.; Graham, N.A.J.; Auber, A.
Titre Interspecific differences in environmental response blur trait dynamics in classic statistical analyses Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Biol.
Volume (down) 166 Numéro 12 Pages 152
Mots-Clés climate-change; community composition; ecology; framework; functional diversity; impact; rules
Résumé Trait-based ecology strives to better understand how species, through their bio-ecological traits, respond to environmental changes, and influence ecosystem functioning. Identifying which traits are most responsive to environmental changes can provide insight for understanding community structuring and developing sustainable management practices. However, misinterpretations are possible, because standard statistical methods (e.g., principal component analysis and linear regression) for identifying and ranking the responses of different traits to environmental changes ignore interspecific differences. Here, using both artificial data and real-world examples from marine fish communities, we show how considering species-specific responses can lead to drastically different results than standard community-level methods. By demonstrating the potential impacts of interspecific differences on trait dynamics, we illuminate a major, yet rarely discussed issue, highlighting how analytical misinterpretations can confound our basic understanding of trait responses, which could have important consequences for biodiversity conservation.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
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Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0025-3162 ISBN Médium
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Notes WOS:000496131000001 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2660
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