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Auteur Chao, A.; Chiu, C.-H.; Villeger, S.; Sun, I.-F.; Thorn, S.; Lin, Y.-C.; Chiang, J.-M.; Sherwin, W.B. doi  openurl
  Titre An attribute-diversity approach to functional diversity, functional beta diversity, and related (dis)similarity measures Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Monogr.  
  Volume (down) 89 Numéro 2 Pages Unsp-e01343  
  Mots-Clés attribute diversity; biodiversity; biological diversity; consensus; conservation; differentiation measures; diversity decomposition; evenness; framework; functional (dis)similarity; functional beta diversity; functional diversity; Hill numbers; phylogenetic diversity; quadratic entropy; similarity; species diversity; species richness; species traits; trait diversity  
  Résumé Based on the framework of attribute diversity (a generalization of Hill numbers of order q), we develop a class of functional diversity measures sensitive not only to species abundances but also to trait-based species-pairwise functional distances. The new method refines and improves on the conventional species-equivalent approach in three areas: (1) the conventional method often gives similar values (close to unity) to assemblages with contrasting levels of functional diversity; (2) when a distance metric is unbounded, the conventional functional diversity depends on the presence/absence of other assemblages in the study; (3) in partitioning functional gamma diversity into alpha and beta components, the conventional gamma is sometimes less than alpha. To resolve these issues, we add to the attribute-diversity framework a novel concept: tau, the threshold of functional distinctiveness between any two species; here, tau can be chosen to be any positive value. Any two species with functional distance >= tau are treated as functionally equally distinct. Our functional diversity quantifies the effective number of functionally equally distinct species (or “virtual functional groups”) with all pairwise distances at least tau for different species pairs. We advocate the use of two complementary diversity profiles (tau profile and q profile), which depict functional diversity with varying levels of tau and q, respectively. Both the conventional species-equivalent method (i.e., tau is the maximum of species-pairwise distances) and classic taxonomic diversity (i.e., tau is the minimum of non-zero species-pairwise distances) are incorporated into our proposed tau profile for an assemblage. For any type of species-pairwise distance matrices, our attribute-diversity approach allows proper diversity partitioning, with the desired property gamma >= alpha and thus avoids all the restrictions that apply to the conventional diversity decomposition. Our functional alpha and gamma are interpreted as the effective numbers of functionally equally distinct species, respectively, in an assemblage and in the pooled assemblage, while beta is the effective number of equally large assemblages with no shared species and all species in the assemblages being equally distinct. The resulting beta diversity can be transformed to obtain abundance-sensitive Sorensen- and Jaccard-type functional (dis)similarity profiles. Hypothetical and real examples are used to illustrate the framework. Online software and R codes are available to facilitate computations.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0012-9615 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes WOS:000477640700001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2620  
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Auteur Legras, G.; Loiseau, N.; Gaertner, J.-C. doi  openurl
  Titre Functional richness: Overview of indices and underlying concepts Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Acta Oecol.-Int. J. Ecol.  
  Volume (down) 87 Numéro Pages 34-44  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; community composition; diversity indexes; ecology; ecosystem processes; fish communities; Functional richness indices; Guidelines; Index properties; intraspecific trait variation; Limitations; phylogenetic diversity; species richness; variability  
  Résumé Functional richness, currently defined as the amount of niche space occupied by the species within a community, is one of the three major components of functional diversity. Different indices have been developed in order to quantify this component. However, the range of indices available for assessing functional richness, often mathematically complex and based on different rationales, can cause confusion for field ecologists and lead to misinterpretation of the results obtained. In this context, we have provided the first study exclusively focused on the comparison of the definitions, advantages and drawbacks of a large set of functional richness indices. The first part of this work is focused on four indices (FDP&G, FRic, TOP and N-hypervolumes indices) that are currently the most commonly used for assessing functional richness. We have completed our study by including recently developed indices that enable us to take into account the intraspecific trait variability (i.e. FRim index and TDP framework), because there is currently a growing scientific consensus regarding the necessity of including this aspect in the assessment of the functional diversity of communities. We demonstrate that although authors have argued that their index describes the functional richness, each of them describes only part of it, and this part may strongly differ from one index to another. Rather than advocating the general use of a single index and/or systematically avoiding others, our study highlights the need for selecting indices in close relation with the context, the available data and the aims of each study. Such a strategy is an essential preliminary step for preventing misunderstanding and artefactual controversies. Along these lines, we propose some guidelines to help users in selecting the most appropriate indices according both to the facet of functional richness on which they wish to focus and to the characteristics of the available data.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1146-609x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2323  
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Auteur Si, X.; Baselga, A.; Leprieur, F.; Song, X.; Ding, P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Selective extinction drives taxonomic and functional alpha and beta diversities in island bird assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée J Anim Ecol  
  Volume (down) 85 Numéro 2 Pages 409-418  
  Mots-Clés Beta diversity; community assembly; dispersal; diversity–area relationship; environmental filtering; functional trait; island biogeography; nestedness; null model; turnover  
  Résumé * Taxonomic diversity considers all species being equally different from each other and thus disregards species’ different ecological functions. Exploring taxonomic and functional aspects of biodiversity simultaneously can better understand the processes of community assembly. * We analysed taxonomic and functional alpha and beta diversities of breeding bird assemblages on land-bridge islands in the Thousand Island Lake, China. Given the high dispersal ability of most birds at this spatial scale (several kilometres), we predicted (i) selective extinction driving alpha and beta diversities after the creation of land-bridge islands of varying area and (ii) low taxonomic and functional beta diversities that were not correlated to spatial distance. * Breeding birds were surveyed on 37 islands annually from 2007 to 2014. We decomposed beta diversity of breeding birds into spatial turnover and nestedness-resultant components, and related taxonomic and functional diversities to island area and isolation using power regression models (for alpha diversity) and multiple regression models on distance matrices (for beta diversity). We then ran simulations to assess the strength of the correlations between taxonomic and functional diversities. * Results revealed that both taxonomic and functional alpha diversities increased with island area. The taxonomic nestedness-resultant and turnover components increased and decreased with difference in area, respectively, but functional counterparts did not. Isolation played a minor role in explaining alpha- and beta-diversity patterns. By partitioning beta diversity, we found low levels of overall taxonomic and functional beta diversities. The functional nestedness-resultant component dominated overall functional beta diversity, whereas taxonomic turnover was the dominant component for taxonomic beta diversity. The simulation showed that functional alpha and beta diversities were significantly correlated with taxonomic diversities, and the observed values of correlations were significantly different from null expectations of random extinction. * Our assessment of island bird assemblages validated the predictions of no distance effects and low beta diversity due to pervasive dispersal events among islands and also suggested that selective extinction drives taxonomic and functional alpha and beta diversities. The contrasting turnover and nestedness-resultant components of taxonomic and functional beta diversities demonstrate the importance of considering the multifaceted nature of biodiversity when examining community assembly.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1365-2656 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1543  
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Auteur Fernandez-Arcaya, U.; Bitetto, I.; Esteban, A.; Teresa Farriols, M.; Garcia-Ruiz, C.; Gil de Sola, L.; Guijarro, B.; Jadaud, A.; Kavadas, S.; Lembo, G.; Milisenda, G.; Maina, I.; Petovic, S.; Sion, L.; Vaz, S.; Massuti, E. doi  openurl
  Titre Large-scale distribution of a deep-sea megafauna community along Mediterranean trawlable grounds Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci. Mar.  
  Volume (down) 83 Numéro Pages 175-187  
  Mots-Clés aristeus-antennatus risso; biodiversity; biomass; community; continental slope; decapod crustaceans; deep sea; demersal fish diversity; distribution pattern; fishing impact; impacts; megafauna; red shrimp; relative roles; size; spatial-distribution; western  
  Résumé The large-scale distribution pattern of megafauna communities along the Mediterranean middle slope was explored. The study was conducted between 500 and 800 m depth where deep-water fishery occurs. Although community studies carried out deeper than 500 m are partly available for some geographic areas, few large-scale comparative studies have been carried out. Within the framework of the MEDITS survey programme, we compared the megafauna community structure in ten geographical sub-areas (GSAs) along the Mediterranean coasts. Additionally, the spatial distribution of fishing was analysed using vessel monitoring by satellite information. Overall, the community showed a significant difference between sub-areas, with a decreasing eastward pattern in abundance and biomass. Longitude was the main factor explaining variation among sub-areas (by generalized additive models). However, we found a region which did not follow the general pattern. GSA 6 (northern Spain) showed significantly lower abundance and a different composition structure to the adjacent areas. The decrease in community descriptors (i.e. abundance and biomass) in this area is probably a symptom of population changes induced by intense fishery exploitation. Overall, a combination of environmental variables and human-induced impacts appears to influence the bentho-pelagic communities along the slope areas of the Mediterranean.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0214-8358 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000504829900014 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2699  
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Auteur Villeger, S.; Brosse, S.; Mouchet, M.; Mouillot, D.; Vanni, M.J. doi  openurl
  Titre Functional ecology of fish: current approaches and future challenges Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Aquat. Sci.  
  Volume (down) 79 Numéro 4 Pages 783-801  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; centrarchid fishes; coral-reef fishes; dietary-morphological relationships; ecosystem processes; Ecosystem services; fish; food-web; fresh-water fish; functional trait; global change; labrid fishes; life-history strategies; ocean; phosphorus-limitation; population regulation; river  
  Résumé Fish communities face increasing anthropogenic pressures in freshwater and marine ecosystems that modify their biodiversity and threaten the services they supply to human populations. To address these issues, studies have been increasingly focusing on functions of fish that are linked to their main ecological roles in aquatic ecosystems. Fish are indeed known to control other organisms through predation, mediate nutrient fluxes, and can act as ecosystem engineers. Here for each of the key functions played by fish, we present the functional traits that have already been used to assess them. We include traits measurable from observations on living individuals, morphological features measured on preserved organisms or traits categorized using information from the literature, and we discuss their respective advantages and limitations. We then list future research directions to foster a more complete functional approach for fish ecology that needs to incorporate functional traits describing, food provisioning and cultural services while accounting more frequently for intraspecific variability. Finally, we highlight ecological and evolutionary questions that could be addressed using meta-analyses of large trait databases, and how a trait-based framework could provide valuable insights on the mechanistic links between global changes, functional diversity of fish assemblages, and ecosystem services.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1015-1621 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2211  
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