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Auteur Montano, S.; Fattorini, S.; Parravicini, V.; Berumen, M.L.; Galli, P.; Maggioni, D.; Arrigoni, R.; Seveso, D.; Strona, G. doi  openurl
  Titre Corals hosting symbiotic hydrozoans are less susceptible to predation and disease Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.  
  Volume 284 Numéro 1869 Pages 20172405  
  Mots-Clés diversity; climate change; climate-change; great-barrier-reef; coral reefs; association; scleractinian corals; cnidaria; 1st record; acanthaster; bleaching; co-evolution; drupella; Drupella; zanclea  
  Résumé In spite of growing evidence that climate change may dramatically affect networks of interacting species, whether- and to what extent-ecological interactions can mediate species' responses to disturbances is an open question. Here we show how a largely overseen association such as that between hydrozoans and scleractinian corals could be possibly associated with a reduction in coral susceptibility to ever-increasing predator and disease outbreaks. We examined 2455 scleractinian colonies (from both Maldivian and the Saudi Arabian coral reefs) searching for non-random patterns in the occurrence of hydrozoans on corals showing signs of different health conditions (i.e. bleaching, algal overgrowth, corallivory and different coral diseases). We show that, after accounting for geographical, ecological and co-evolutionary factors, signs of disease and corallivory are significantly lower in coral colonies hosting hydrozoans than in hydrozoan-free ones. This finding has important implications for our understanding of the ecology of coral reefs, and for their conservation in the current scenario of global change, because it suggests that symbiotic hydrozoans may play an active role in protecting their scleractinian hosts from stresses induced by warming water temperatures.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2258  
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Auteur Seddon, N.; Mace, G.M.; Naeem, S.; Tobias, J.A.; Pigot, A.L.; Cavanagh, R.; Mouillot, D.; Vause, J.; Walpole, M. doi  openurl
  Titre Biodiversity in the Anthropocene: prospects and policy Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.  
  Volume 283 Numéro 1844 Pages 20162094  
  Mots-Clés environment; productivity; functional diversity; ecosystem; conservation; land-use; species richness; extinction; ecosystem services; plant diversity; values; biodiversity services; ecological resilience; interdisciplinary; sustainable development  
  Résumé Meeting the ever-increasing needs of the Earth's human population without excessively reducing biological diversity is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity, suggesting that newapproaches to biodiversity conservation are required. One idea rapidly gaining momentum-as well as opposition-is to incorporate the values of biodiversity into decision-making using economic methods. Here, we develop several lines of argument for how biodiversity might be valued, building on recent developments in natural science, economics and science-policy processes. Then we provide a synoptic guide to the papers in this special feature, summarizing recent research advances relevant to biodiversity valuation and management. Current evidence suggests that more biodiverse systems have greater stability and resilience, and that by maximizing key components of biodiversity we maximize an ecosystem's long-term value. Moreover, many services and values arising from biodiversity are interdependent, and often poorly captured by standard economic models. We conclude that economic valuation approaches to biodiversity conservation should (i) account for interdependency and (ii) complement rather than replace traditional approaches. To identify possible solutions, we present a framework for understanding the foundational role of hard-to-quantify ` biodiversity services' in sustaining the value of ecosystems to humanity, and then use this framework to highlight new directions for pure and applied research. In most cases, clarifying the links between biodiversity and ecosystem services, and developing effective policy and practice for managing biodiversity, will require a genuinely interdisciplinary approach.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2248  
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Auteur Evans, S.M.; McKenna, C.; Simpson, S.D.; Tournois, J.; Genner, M.J. doi  openurl
  Titre Patterns of species range evolution in Indo-Pacific reef assemblages reveal the Coral Triangle as a net source of transoceanic diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Lett.  
  Volume 12 Numéro 6 Pages 20160090  
  Mots-Clés Bayesian skyline plot; biogeography; climate change; coral reef; fishes global patterns; marine biodiversity; ocean; phylogeography; refugia; species distributions  
  Résumé The Coral Triangle in the Indo-Pacific is a region renowned for exceptional marine biodiversity. The area could have acted as a 'centre of origin' where speciation has been prolific or a 'centre of survival' by providing refuge during major environmental shifts such as sea-level changes. The region could also have acted as a 'centre of accumulation' for species with origins outside of the Coral Triangle, owing to it being at a central position between the Indian and Pacific oceans. Here, we investigated support for these hypotheses using population-level DNA sequence-based reconstructions of the range evolution of 45 species (314 populations) of Indo-Pacific reef-associated organisms. Our results show that populations undergoing the most ancient establishment were significantly more likely to be closer to the centre of the Coral Triangle than to peripheral locations. The data are consistent with the Coral Triangle being a net source of coral-reef biodiversity for the Indo-Pacific region, suggesting that the region has acted primarily as a centre of survival, a centre of origin or both. These results provide evidence of how a key location can influence the large-scale distributions of biodiversity over evolutionary timescales.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1694  
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Auteur Kadowaki, K.; Barbera, C.G.; Godsoe, W.; Delsuc, F.; Mouquet, N. doi  openurl
  Titre Predicting biotic interactions and their variability in a changing environment Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Lett.  
  Volume 12 Numéro 5 Pages 20151073  
  Mots-Clés Bacteria; climate-change; climate change; distribution models; diversity; extinction risk; global change; microcosm; phylogeny; predictive ecology; range; responses; shifts  
  Résumé Global environmental change is altering the patterns of biodiversity worldwide. Observation and theory suggest that species' distributions and abundances depend on a suite of processes, notably abiotic filtering and biotic interactions, both of which are constrained by species' phylogenetic history. Models predicting species distribution have historically mostly considered abiotic filtering and are only starting to integrate biotic interaction. However, using information on present interactions to forecast the future of biodiversity supposes that biotic interactions will not change when species are confronted with new environments. Using bacterial microcosms, we illustrate how biotic interactions can vary along an environmental gradient and how this variability can depend on the phylogenetic distance between interacting species.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1653  
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Auteur Collet, A.; Durand, J.-D.; Desmarais, E.; Cerqueira, F.; Cantinelli, T.; Valade, P.; Ponton, D. doi  openurl
  Titre DNA barcoding post-larvae can improve the knowledge about fish biodiversity: an example from La Reunion, SW Indian Ocean Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Mitochondrial DNA Part A  
  Volume 29 Numéro 6 Pages 905-918  
  Mots-Clés DNA barcoding; estimating diversity; fauna; fish larvae; ichthyoplankton; island; Mascarene Archipelago; reef; species richness  
  Résumé The aim of this study was to demonstrate that fish larvae identified using their COI sequences offer a unique opportunity for improving the knowledge of local fish richness. Fish larvae were sampled at the end of their pelagic phase using light-traps set off the West Coast of La Reunion Island, southwestern Indian Ocean, once per month from October 2014 to March 2015. Among the 5174 larvae caught, 214 morphologically different specimens were selected, 196 successfully barcoded, giving a total of 101 different Barcode Index Numbers (BINs). Among these BINs, 55 had never been recorded in La Reunion exclusive economic zone (EEZ), and 13 were new for the BOLD database. Even if the sampling effort for collecting fish post-larvae during this study was relatively low, it allowed adding at least nine new species to an updated checklist of fishes of La Reunion EEZ.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2470-1394 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2394  
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