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Auteur Bender, M.G.; Leprieur, F.; Mouillot, D.; Kulbicki, M.; Parravicini, V.; Pie, M.R.; Barneche, D.R.; Oliveira-Santos, L.G.R.; Floeter, S.R. doi  openurl
  Titre Isolation drives taxonomic and functional nestedness in tropical reef fish faunas Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume 40 Numéro 3 Pages 425-435  
  Mots-Clés assembly rules; biodiversity; communities; coral-reef; diversity; global patterns; islands; null model analysis; species richness; traits  
  Résumé Taxonomic nestedness, the degree to which the taxonomic composition of species-poor assemblages represents a subset of richer sites, commonly occurs in habitat fragments and islands differing in size and isolation from a source pool. However, species are not ecologically equivalent and the extent to which nestedness is observed in terms of functional trait composition of assemblages still remains poorly known. Here, using an extensive database on the functional traits and the distributions of 6316 tropical reef fish species across 169 sites, we assessed the levels of taxonomical vs functional nestedness of reef fish assemblages at the global scale. Functional nestedness was considerably more common than taxonomic nestedness, and generally associated with geographical isolation, where nested subsets are gradually more isolated from surrounding reef areas and from the center of biodiversity. Because a nested pattern in functional composition implies that certain combinations of traits may be represented by few species, we identified these groups of low redundancy that include large herbivore-detritivores and omnivores, small piscivores, and macro-algal herbivores. The identified patterns of nestedness may be an outcome of the interaction between species dispersal capabilities, resource requirements, and gradients of isolation among habitats. The importance of isolation in generating the observed pattern of functional nestedness within biogeographic regions may indicate that disturbance in depauperate and isolated sites can have disproportionate effects on the functional structure of their reef fish assemblages.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2107  
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Auteur Fournier, B.; Mouquet, N.; Leibold, M.A.; Gravel, D. doi  openurl
  Titre An integrative framework of coexistence mechanisms in competitive metacommunities Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume 40 Numéro 5 Pages 630-641  
  Mots-Clés assembly processes; biodiversity; community ecology; dispersal; metapopulation dynamics; neutral metacommunities; niche; recruitment limitation; Restoration; species-diversity  
  Résumé Species distribution in a metacommunity varies according to their traits, the distribution of environmental conditions and connectivity among localities. These ingredients contribute to coexistence across spatial scales via species sorting, patch dynamics, mass effects and neutral dynamics. These mechanisms however seldom act in isolation and the impact of landscape configuration on their relative importance remains poorly understood. We present a new model of metacommunity dynamics that simultaneously considers these four possible mechanisms over spatially explicit landscapes and propose a statistical approach to partition their contribution to species distribution. We find that landscape configuration can induce dispersal limitations that have negative consequences for local species richness. This result was more pronounced with neutral dynamics and mass effect than with species sorting or patch dynamics. We also find that the relative importance of the four mechanisms varies not only among landscape configurations, but also among species, with some species being mostly constrained by dispersal and/or drift and others by sorting. Changes in landscape properties might lead to a shift in coexistence mechanisms and, by extension, to a change in community composition. This confirms the importance of considering landscape properties for conservation and management. Our results illustrate the idea that ecological communities are the results of multiple mechanisms acting at the same time and complete our understanding of spatial processes in competitive metacommunities.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2141  
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Auteur Cazelles, K.; Mouquet, N.; Mouillot, D.; Gravel, D. doi  openurl
  Titre On the integration of biotic interaction and environmental constraints at the biogeographical scale Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume 39 Numéro 10 Pages 921-931  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; climate-change; cooccurrence; distributions; ecological communities; evolutionary; food webs; networks; niche; species distribution models  
  Résumé Biogeography is primarily concerned with the spatial distribution of biodiversity, including performing scenarios in a changing environment. The efforts deployed to develop species distribution models have resulted in predictive tools, but have mostly remained correlative and have largely ignored biotic interactions. Here we build upon the theory of island biogeography as a first approximation to the assembly dynamics of local communities embedded within a metacommunity context. We include all types of interactions and introduce environmental constraints on colonization and extinction dynamics. We develop a probabilistic framework based on Markov chains and derive probabilities for the realization of species assemblages, rather than single species occurrences. We consider the expected distribution of species richness under different types of ecological interactions. We also illustrate the potential of our framework by studying the interplay between different ecological requirements, interactions and the distribution of biodiversity along an environmental gradient. Our framework supports the idea that the future research in biogeography requires a coherent integration of several ecological concepts into a single theory in order to perform conceptual and methodological innovations, such as the switch from single-species distribution to community distribution.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1683  
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Auteur Leprieur, F.; Colosio, S.; Descombes, P.; Parravicini, V.; Kulbicki, M.; Cowman, P.F.; Bellwood, D.R.; Mouillot, D.; Pellissier, L. doi  openurl
  Titre Historical and contemporary determinants of global phylogenetic structure in tropical reef fish faunas Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume 39 Numéro 9 Pages 825-835  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity hotspots; climate-change; community ecology; coral-reefs; damselfishes teleostei; evolutionary origins; genetic-structure; indo-pacific; latitudinal diversity gradient; species richness  
  Résumé Identifying the main determinants of tropical marine biodiversity is essential for devising appropriate conservation measures mitigating the ongoing degradation of coral reef habitats. Based on a gridded distribution database and phylogenetic information, we compared the phylogenetic structure of assemblages for three tropical reef fish families (Labridae: wrasses, Pomacentridae: damselfishes and Chaetodontidae: butterflyfishes) using the net relatedness (NRI) and nearest taxon (NTI) indices. We then related these indices to contemporary and historical environmental conditions of coral reefs using spatial regression analyses. Higher levels of phylogenetic clustering were found for fish assemblages in the Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA), and more particularly when considering the NTI index. The phylogenetic structure of the Pomacentridae, and to a lower extent of the Chaeotodontidae and Labridae, was primarily associated with the location of refugia during the Quaternary period. Phylogenetic clustering in the IAA may partly result from vicariance events associated with coral reef fragmentation during the glacial periods of the Quaternary. Variation in the patterns among fish families further suggest that dispersal abilities may have interacted with past habitat availability in shaping the phylogenetic structure of tropical reef fish assemblages.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1633  
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Auteur Magris, R.A.; Andrello, M.; Pressey, R.L.; Mouillot, D.; Dalongeville, A.; Jacobi, M.N.; Manel, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Biologically representative and well-connected marine reserves enhance biodiversity persistence in conservation planning Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Conserv. Lett.  
  Volume 11 Numéro 4 Pages Unsp-e12439  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity conservation; climate-change; coral-reefs; design; larval dispersal; marine protected areas; marine reserve design; networks; population connectivity; protected areas; spatial planning; spatial prioritization  
  Résumé Current methods in conservation planning for promoting the persistence of biodiversity typically focus on either representing species geographic distributions or maintaining connectivity between reserves, but rarely both, and take a focal species, rather than a multispecies, approach. Here, we link prioritization methods with population models to explore the impact of integrating both representation and connectivity into conservation planning for species persistence. Using data on 288 Mediterranean fish species with varying conservation requirements, we show that: (1) considering both representation and connectivity objectives provides the best strategy for enhanced biodiversity persistence and (2) connectivity objectives were fundamental to enhancing persistence of small-ranged species, which are most in need of conservation, while the representation objective benefited only wide-ranging species. Our approach provides a more comprehensive appraisal of planning applications than approaches focusing on either representation or connectivity, and will hopefully contribute to build more effective reserve networks for the persistence of biodiversity.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1755-263x ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2423  
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