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Auteur Toussaint, A.; Charpin, N.; Beauchard, O.; Grenouillet, G.; Oberdorff, T.; Tedesco, P.A.; Brosse, S.; Villeger, S. doi  openurl
  Titre Non-native species led to marked shifts in functional diversity of the world freshwater fish faunas Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Lett.  
  Volume 21 Numéro 11 Pages 1649-1659  
  Mots-Clés assemblages; biodiversity; Biotic exchanges; communities; extinction; extirpations; functional richness; functional divergence; homogenization; hydropower; introduction; invasion; islands; macroecology; patterns; richness  
  Résumé Global spread of non-native species profoundly changed the world biodiversity patterns, but how it translates into functional changes remains unanswered at the world scale. We here show that while in two centuries the number of fish species per river increased on average by 15% in 1569 basins worldwide, the diversity of their functional attributes (i.e. functional richness) increased on average by 150%. The inflation of functional richness was paired with changes in the functional structure of assemblages, with shifts of species position toward the border of the functional space of assemblages (i.e. increased functional divergence). Non-native species moreover caused shifts in functional identity toward higher body sized and less elongated species for most of assemblages throughout the world. Although varying between rivers and biogeographic realms, such changes in the different facets of functional diversity might still increase in the future through increasing species invasion and may further modify ecosystem functioning.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2425  
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Auteur Jacquet, C.; Mouillot, D.; Kulbicki, M.; Gravel, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Extensions of Island Biogeography Theory predict the scaling of functional trait composition with habitat area and isolation Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecol. Lett.  
  Volume 20 Numéro 2 Pages 135-146  
  Mots-Clés Allometric theory; animal abundance; body-size; body-size distributions; complex food webs; coral-reef fishes; diversity; Ecology; evolution; Food web; global patterns; island biogeography; population-density; species richness; tropical reefs  
  Résumé The Theory of Island Biogeography (TIB) predicts how area and isolation influence species richness equilibrium on insular habitats. However, the TIB remains silent about functional trait composition and provides no information on the scaling of functional diversity with area, an observation that is now documented in many systems. To fill this gap, we develop a probabilistic approach to predict the distribution of a trait as a function of habitat area and isolation, extending the TIB beyond the traditional species-area relationship. We compare model predictions to the body-size distribution of piscivorous and herbivorous fishes found on tropical reefs worldwide. We find that small and isolated reefs have a higher proportion of large-sized species than large and connected reefs. We also find that knowledge of species body-size and trophic position improves the predictions of fish occupancy on tropical reefs, supporting both the allometric and trophic theory of island biogeography. The integration of functional ecology to island biogeography is broadly applicable to any functional traits and provides a general probabilistic approach to study the scaling of trait distribution with habitat area and isolation.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1461-023x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2087  
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Auteur Leitao, R.P.; Zuanon, J.; Mouillot, D.; Leal, C.G.; Hughes, R.M.; Kaufmann, P.R.; Villeger, S.; Pompeu, P.S.; Kasper, D.; de Paula, F.R.; Ferraz, S.F.B.; Gardner, T.A. doi  openurl
  Titre Disentangling the pathways of land use impacts on the functional structure of fish assemblages in Amazon streams Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume 41 Numéro 1 Pages 219-232  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; diversity; responses; habitat; community structure; fresh-water fish; aquatic vertebrates; deforestation; ecosystem processes; multiple spatial scales  
  Résumé Agricultural land use is a primary driver of environmental impacts on streams. However, the causal processes that shape these impacts operate through multiple pathways and at several spatial scales. This complexity undermines the development of more effective management approaches, and illustrates the need for more in-depth studies to assess the mechanisms that determine changes in stream biodiversity. Here we present results of the most comprehensive multi-scale assessment of the biological condition of streams in the Amazon to date, examining functional responses of fish assemblages to land use. We sampled fish assemblages from two large human-modified regions, and characterized stream conditions by physical habitat attributes and key landscape-change variables, including density of road crossings (i.e. riverscape fragmentation), deforestation, and agricultural intensification. Fish species were functionally characterized using ecomorphological traits describing feeding, locomotion, and habitat preferences, and these traits were used to derive indices that quantitatively describe the functional structure of the assemblages. Using structural equation modeling, we disentangled multiple drivers operating at different spatial scales, identifying causal pathways that significantly affect stream condition and the structure of the fish assemblages. Deforestation at catchment and riparian network scales altered the channel morphology and the stream bottom structure, changing the functional identity of assemblages. Local deforestation reduced the functional evenness of assemblages (i.e. increased dominance of specific trait combinations) mediated by expansion of aquatic vegetation cover. Riverscape fragmentation reduced functional richness, evenness and divergence, suggesting a trend toward functional homogenization and a reduced range of ecological niches within assemblages following the loss of regional connectivity. These results underscore the often-unrecognized importance of different land use changes, each of which can have marked effects on stream biodiversity. We draw on the relationships observed herein to suggest priorities for the improved management of stream systems in the multiple-use landscapes that predominate in human-modified tropical forests.  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2252  
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Auteur Gaboriau, T.; Leprieur, F.; Mouillot, D.; Hubert, N. doi  openurl
  Titre Influence of the geography of speciation on current patterns of coral reef fish biodiversity across the Indo-Pacific Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume 41 Numéro 8 Pages 1295-1306  
  Mots-Clés damselfishes pomacentridae; evolutionary history; family labridae; global patterns; marine biodiversity; maximum-likelihood; peripheral endemism; phylogenies; species richness; west pacific  
  Résumé The role of speciation processes in shaping current biodiversity patterns represents a major scientific question for ecologists and biogeographers. Hence, numerous methods have been developed to determine the geography of speciation based on co-occurrence between sister-species. Most of these methods rely on the correlation between divergence time and several metrics based on the geographic ranges of sister-taxa (i.e. overlap, asymmetry). The relationship between divergence time and these metrics has scarcely been examined in a spatial context beyond regression curves. Mapping this relationship across spatial grids, however, may unravel how speciation processes have shaped current biodiversity patterns through space and time. This can be particularly relevant for coral reef fishes of the Indo-Pacific since the origin of the exceptional concentration of biodiversity in the Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA) has been actively debated, with several alternative hypotheses involving species diversification and dispersal. We reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships between three species-rich families of coral reef fish (Chaetodontidae, Labridae, Pomacentridae) and calculated co-occurrence metrics between closely related lineages of those families. We demonstrated that repeated biogeographic processes can be identified in present-day species distribution by projecting co-occurrence metrics between related lineages in a geographical context. Our study also evidence that sister-species do not co-occur randomly across the Indo-Pacific, but tend to overlap their range within the IAA. We identified the imprint of two important biogeographic processes that caused this pattern in 48% of the sister-taxa considered: speciation events within the IAA and repeated divergence between the Indian and Pacific Ocean, with subsequent secondary contact in the IAA.  
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  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2388  
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Auteur Benedetti, F.; Guilhaumon, F.; Adloff, F.; Ayata, S.-D. doi  openurl
  Titre Investigating uncertainties in zooplankton composition shifts under climate change scenarios in the Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume 41 Numéro 2 Pages 345-360  
  Mots-Clés marine biodiversity; species distribution models; north-atlantic; beta diversity; calanoid copepods; ecological-niche; envelope models; habitat-suitability; mass mortality; pseudo-absence data  
  Résumé Ensemble niche modelling has become a common framework to predict changes in assemblages composition under climate change scenarios. The amount of uncertainty generated by the different components of this framework has rarely been assessed. In the marine realm forecasts have usually focused on taxa representing the top of the marine food-web, thus overlooking their basal component: the plankton. Calibrating environmental niche models at the global scale, we modelled the habitat suitability of 106 copepod species and estimated the dissimilarity between present and future zooplanktonic assemblages in the surface Mediterranean Sea. We identified the patterns (species replacement versus nestedness) driving the predicted dissimilarity, and quantified the relative contributions of different uncertainty sources: environmental niche models, greenhouse gas emission scenarios, circulation model configurations and species prevalence. Our results confirm that the choice of the niche modelling method is the greatest source of uncertainty in habitat suitability projections. Presence-only and presence-absence methods provided different visions of the niches, which subsequently lead to different future scenarios of biodiversity changes. Nestedness with decline in species richness is the pattern driving dissimilarity between present and future copepod assemblages. Our projections contrast with those reported for higher trophic levels, suggesting that different components of the pelagic food-web may respond discordantly to future climatic changes.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2282  
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