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Auteur Aubé, J.; Senin, P.; Pringault, O.; Bonin, P.; Deflandre, B.; Bouchez, O.; Bru, N.; Biritxinaga-Etchart, E.; Klopp, C.; Guyoneaud, R.; Goñi-Urriza, M. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre The impact of long-term hydrocarbon exposure on the structure, activity, and biogeochemical functioning of microbial mats Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Marine Pollution Bulletin  
  Volume 111 Numéro 1 Pages 115-125  
  Mots-Clés Biogeochemical functioning; diversity; Hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria; Microbial mats  
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  ISSN 0025-326x ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2155  
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Auteur Maury, O.; Poggiale, J.-C. url  openurl
  Titre From individuals to populations to communities: A dynamic energy budget model of marine ecosystem size-spectrum including life history diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Theoretical Biology  
  Volume 324 Numéro Pages 52-71  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; Dynamic Energy Budget theory; predation; Schooling; Size spectrum  
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  ISSN 0022-5193 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes <p>\textbackslashtextlessp\textbackslashtextgreaterIndividual metabolism, predator–prey relationships, and the role of biodiversity are major factors underlying the dynamics of food webs and their response to environmental variability. Despite their crucial, complementary and interacting influences, they are usually not considered simultaneously in current marine ecosystem models. In an attempt to fill this gap and determine if these factors and their interaction are sufficient to allow realistic community structure and dynamics to emerge, we formulate a mathematical model of the size-structured dynamics of marine communities which integrates mechanistically individual, population and community levels. The model represents the transfer of energy generated in both time and size by an infinite number of interacting fish species spanning from very small to very large species. It is based on standard individual level assumptions of the Dynamic Energy Budget theory (DEB) as well as important ecological processes such as opportunistic size-based predation and competition for food. Resting on the inter-specific body-size scaling relationships of the DEB theory, the diversity of life-history traits (i.e. biodiversity) is explicitly integrated. The stationary solutions of the model as well as the transient solutions arising when environmental signals (e.g. variability of primary production and temperature) propagate through the ecosystem are studied using numerical simulations. It is shown that in the absence of density-dependent feedback processes, the model exhibits unstable oscillations. Density-dependent schooling probability and schooling-dependent predatory and disease mortalities are proposed to be important stabilizing factors allowing stationary solutions to be reached. At the community level, the shape and slope of the obtained quasi-linear stationary spectrum matches well with empirical studies. When oscillations of primary production are simulated, the model predicts that the variability propagates along the spectrum in a given frequency-dependent size range before decreasing for larger sizes. At the species level, the simulations show that small and large species dominate the community successively (small species being more abundant at small sizes and large species being more abundant at large sizes) and that the total biomass of a species decreases with its maximal size which again corroborates empirical studies. Our results indicate that the simultaneous consideration of individual growth and reproduction, size-structured trophic interactions, the diversity of life-history traits and a density-dependent stabilizing process allow realistic community structure and dynamics to emerge without any arbitrary prescription. As a logical consequence of our model construction and a basis for future studies, we define the function Φ as the relative contribution of each species to the total biomass of the ecosystem, for any given size. We argue that this function is a measure of the functional role of biodiversity characterizing the impact of the structure of the community (its species composition) on its function (the relative proportions of losses, dissipation and biological work).\textbackslashtextless/p\textbackslashtextgreater</p> Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel LL @ pixluser @ collection 245  
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Auteur Ben Lamine, Y.; Pringault, O.; Aissi, M.; Ensibi, C.; Mahmoudi, E.; Daly Yahia Kefi, O.; Daly Yahia, M.N. url  openurl
  Titre Environmental controlling factors of copepod communities in the Gulf of Tunis (south western Mediterranean Sea) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Cahiers de Biologie Marine  
  Volume 56 Numéro 3 Pages 213-229  
  Mots-Clés Competition; Copepod diversity; multivariate analysis; Salinity; Temperature; Top-down control  
  Résumé The copepod community structure and the distribution of the main groups of zooplankton were studied along an inshore-offshore gradient in the Gulf of Tunis during the rainy and dry seasons of 2007-2008. Hydrological parameters were also measured to assess the potential role of abiotic and biotic factors in the distribution of copepod species. The copepod community in the Gulf of Tunis comprises 86 species dominated by Paracalanus parvus, Clausocalanus lividus, Centropages kroyeri and Acartia clausi. Time had a greater influence than space (horizontal and vertical gradients) in shaping the copepod community structure with a significant influence of the seasons; winter (cold and rainy) resulted in hydrological conditions that were strongly different from those observed in summer (warm and dry). These hydrological differences were concomitant with changes in the community structure, with a high copepod diversity observed in winter while the summer period was characterized by a low specific richness and the dominance of a few species, Centropages kroyeri and Paracalanus parvus along the inshore-offshore gradient and Paracalanus aculeatus along the vertical. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that temperature, salinity and to a lesser extent chlorophyll a were the most important environmental factors structuring the copepod community. Interestingly, temperature and salinity showed a negative significant correlation with copepod specific richness. Competition with grazers (cladoceran) as well as top down control by predators (chaetognaths and siphonophors) were also identified as key factors for the copepod community structure.  
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  ISSN 0007-9723 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes WOS:000358550200003 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1324  
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Auteur Hattab, T.; Albouy, C.; Lasram, F.B.; Le Loc'h, F.; Guilhaumon, F.; Leprieur, F. url  doi
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  Titre A biogeographical regionalization of coastal Mediterranean fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Biogeography  
  Volume 42 Numéro 7 Pages 1336-1348  
  Mots-Clés Beta diversity; Biogeography; bioregionalization; coastal fishes; compositional turnover; environmental gradient; historical processes; Mediterranean Sea; phylogenetic turnover; species composition  
  Résumé AimTo delineate the biogeographical regions of the continental shelf of the Mediterranean Sea based on the spatial distributions of coastal marine fishes and their evolutionary relationships, with a view to furthering our capacity to answer basic and applied biogeographical, ecological and evolutionary questions. LocationMediterranean Sea. MethodsWe used a dataset summarizing the occurrences of 203 coastal Mediterranean fishes (0.1 degrees resolution grid system) and a molecular phylogenetic tree to quantify both compositional and phylogenetic dissimilarity (or beta diversity) between cells. We then applied multivariate analyses to delineate biogeographical regions and to evaluate how they related to broad-scale environmental gradients. We also assessed the differences between the biogeographical regions identified using phylogenetic beta diversity versus those obtained using compositional beta diversity. ResultsThe bioregionalization schemes based on phylogenetic and compositional beta diversity identified broadly similar regions, each consisting of six distinct pools of coastal fishes. Clear separations between northern and southern regions were observed, as well as a disjunct between inshore and offshore areas. These beta diversity patterns were mainly related to a north-south gradient in sea-surface temperature and bathymetric constraints. Main conclusionsIncorporating phylogenetic information into the measurement of beta diversity did not offer further insights to the bioregionalization scheme based solely on compositional beta diversity. This suggests that evolutionary and historical processes played only a minor role in shaping the contemporary patterns of beta diversity in the Mediterranean coastal fish fauna. However, our results support the view that contemporary environmental conditions play a major role in determining the distribution of these species.  
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  ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1331  
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Auteur Coll, M.; Steenbeek, J.; Lasram, F.B.; Mouillot, D.; Cury, P. url  doi
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  Titre 'Low-hanging fruit' for conservation of marine vertebrate species at risk in the Mediterranean Sea Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Frontiers in Microbiology Revue Abrégée  
  Volume 24 Numéro 2 Pages 226-239  
  Mots-Clés Conservation priorities; cumulative threats; IUCN diversities; marine biodiversity; Marine Protected Areas; Mediterranean Sea  
  Résumé AimConservation priorities need to take the feasibility of protection measures into account. In times of economic pressure it is essential to identify the low-hanging fruit' for conservation: areas where human impacts are lower and biological diversity is still high, and thus conservation is more feasible. LocationWe used the Mediterranean large marine ecosystem (LME) as a case study to identify the overlapping areas of low threats and high diversity of vertebrate species at risk. MethodsThis LME is the first in the world to have a complete regional IUCN Red List assessment of the native marine fish. We augmented these data with distributions of marine mammals, marine turtles and seabirds at risk, and we calculated the spatial distributions of species at risk (IUCN densities). Using cumulative threats we identified priority areas for conservation of species at risk' (PACS), where IUCN diversities are high and threats are low. We assessed whether IUCN diversities and PACS were spatially congruent among taxa and we quantified whether PACS corresponded to current and proposed protected areas. ResultsIUCN densities and PACS were not highly correlated spatially among taxa. Continental shelves and deep-sea slopes of the Alboran Sea, western Mediterranean and Tunisian Plateau/Gulf of Sidra are identified as relevant for fish species at risk. The eastern side of the western Mediterranean and the Adriatic Sea are identified as most relevant for endemic fish, and shelf and open sea areas distributed through the LME are most important for marine mammals and turtles at risk, while specific locations of the western Mediterranean Sea and the Aegean and Levantine seas are highlighted for seabirds. Main conclusionsLarge parts of the areas of PACS fell outside current or proposed frameworks to be prioritized for conservation. PACS may be suitable candidates for contributing to the 10% protection target for the Mediterranean Sea by 2020.  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1102  
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