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Auteur Catherine, A.; Selma, M.; Mouillot, D.; Troussellier, M.; Bernard, C. url  doi
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  Titre Patterns and multi-scale drivers of phytoplankton species richness in temperate peri-urban lakes Type (up) Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Science of The Total Environment  
  Volume 559 Numéro Pages 74-83  
  Mots-Clés Lake- and catchment-scale; Phytoplankton; Productivity–diversity relationship; Random forest; Residuals analysis; species richness  
  Résumé Local species richness (SR) is a key characteristic affecting ecosystem functioning. Yet, the mechanisms regulating phytoplankton diversity in freshwater ecosystems are not fully understood, especially in peri-urban environments where anthropogenic pressures strongly impact the quality of aquatic ecosystems. To address this issue, we sampled the phytoplankton communities of 50 lakes in the Paris area (France) characterized by a large gradient of physico-chemical and catchment-scale characteristics. We used large phytoplankton datasets to describe phytoplankton diversity patterns and applied a machine-learning algorithm to test the degree to which species richness patterns are potentially controlled by environmental factors. Selected environmental factors were studied at two scales: the lake-scale (e.g. nutrients concentrations, water temperature, lake depth) and the catchment-scale (e.g. catchment, landscape and climate variables). Then, we used a variance partitioning approach to evaluate the interaction between lake-scale and catchment-scale variables in explaining local species richness. Finally, we analysed the residuals of predictive models to identify potential vectors of improvement of phytoplankton species richness predictive models. Lake-scale and catchment-scale drivers provided similar predictive accuracy of local species richness (R2 = 0.458 and 0.424, respectively). Both models suggested that seasonal temperature variations and nutrient supply strongly modulate local species richness. Integrating lake- and catchment-scale predictors in a single predictive model did not provide increased predictive accuracy; therefore suggesting that the catchment-scale model probably explains observed species richness variations through the impact of catchment-scale variables on in-lake water quality characteristics. Models based on catchment characteristics, which include simple and easy to obtain variables, provide a meaningful way of predicting phytoplankton species richness in temperate lakes. This approach may prove useful and cost-effective for the management and conservation of aquatic ecosystems.  
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  ISSN 0048-9697 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1566  
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Auteur Tisseuil, C.; Leprieur, F.; Grenouillet, G.; Vrac, M.; Lek, S. url  doi
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  Titre Projected impacts of climate change on spatio-temporal patterns of freshwater fish beta diversity: a deconstructing approach Type (up) Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecology and Biogeography  
  Volume 21 Numéro 12 Pages 1213-1222  
  Mots-Clés Beta diversity; France; ensemble forecasting; freshwater fish; nestedness; species distribution model; temporal changes; turnover  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 799  
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Auteur Miloslavich, P.; Bax, N.J.; Simmons, S.E.; Klein, E.; Appeltans, W.; Aburto‐Oropeza, O.; Garcia, M.A.; Batten, S.D.; Benedetti‐Cecchi, L.; Checkley, D.M.; Chiba, S.; Duffy, J.E.; Dunn, D.C.; Fischer, A.; Gunn, J.; Kudela, R.; Marsac, F.; Muller‐Karger, F.E.; Obura, D.; Shin, Y.-J. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Essential ocean variables for global sustained observations of biodiversity and ecosystem changes Type (up) Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Change Biology  
  Volume 24 Numéro 6 Pages 2416-2433  
  Mots-Clés driver-pressure-state-impact-response; essential ocean variables; framework for ocean observing; global ocean observing system; marine biodiversity changes; Marine Biodiversity Observation Network; ocean change  
  Résumé Sustained observations of marine biodiversity and ecosystems focused on specific conservation and management problems are needed around the world to effectively mitigate or manage changes resulting from anthropogenic pressures. These observations, while complex and expensive, are required by the international scientific, governance and policy communities to provide baselines against which the effects of human pressures and climate change may be measured and reported, and resources allocated to implement solutions. To identify biological and ecological essential ocean variables (EOVs) for implementation within a global ocean observing system that is relevant for science, informs society, and technologically feasible, we used a driver-pressure-state-impact-response (DPSIR) model. We (1) examined relevant international agreements to identify societal drivers and pressures on marine resources and ecosystems, (2) evaluated the temporal and spatial scales of variables measured by 100+ observing programs, and (3) analysed the impact and scalability of these variables and how they contribute to address societal and scientific issues. EOVs were related to the status of ecosystem components (phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass and diversity, and abundance and distribution of fish, marine turtles, birds and mammals), and to the extent and health of ecosystems (cover and composition of hard coral, seagrass, mangrove and macroalgal canopy). Benthic invertebrate abundance and distribution and microbe diversity and biomass were identified as emerging EOVs to be developed based on emerging requirements and new technologies. The temporal scale at which any shifts in biological systems will be detected will vary across the EOVs, the properties being monitored and the length of the existing time-series. Global implementation to deliver useful products will require collaboration of the scientific and policy sectors and a significant commitment to improve human and infrastructure capacity across the globe, including the development of new, more automated observing technologies, and encouraging the application of international standards and best practices.  
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  ISSN 1365-2486 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2336  
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Auteur Pellissier, L.; Leprieur, F.; Parravicini, V.; Cowman, P.F.; Kulbicki, M.; Litsios, G.; Olsen, S.M.; Wisz, M.S.; Bellwood, D.R.; Mouillot, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Quaternary coral reef refugia preserved fish diversity Type (up) Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Science  
  Volume 344 Numéro 6187 Pages 1016-1019  
  Mots-Clés abundance; areas; assembly rules; cradles; global patterns; gradient; hotspots; marine biodiversity; museums; species richness  
  Résumé The most prominent pattern in global marine biogeography is the biodiversity peak in the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Yet the processes that underpin this pattern are still actively debated. By reconstructing global marine paleoenvironments over the past 3 million years on the basis of sediment cores, we assessed the extent to which Quaternary climate fluctuations can explain global variation in current reef fish richness. Comparing global historical coral reef habitat availability with the present-day distribution of 6316 reef fish species, we find that distance from stable coral reef habitats during historical periods of habitat loss explains 62% of the variation in fish richness, outweighing present-day environmental factors. Our results highlight the importance of habitat persistence during periods of climate change for preserving marine biodiversity.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 801  
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Auteur Milner-Gulland, E.J.; Garcia, S.; Arlidge, W.; Bull, J.; Charles, A.; Dagorn, L.; Fordham, S.; Zivin, J.G.; Hall, M.; Shrader, J.; Vestergaard, N.; Wilcox, C.; Squires, D. doi  openurl
  Titre Translating the terrestrial mitigation hierarchy to marine megafauna by-catch Type (up) Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Fish. Fish.  
  Volume 19 Numéro 3 Pages 547-561  
  Mots-Clés albatrosses; artisanal fisheries; biodiversity offsets; biodiversity offsetting; circle hooks; conservation; economic incentives; fisheries bycatch; fishing effort; harbor porpoise; leatherback turtle; no net loss; seabird bycatch; sharks and rays; turtles  
  Résumé In terrestrial and coastal systems, the mitigation hierarchy is widely and increasingly used to guide actions to ensure that no net loss of biodiversity ensues from development. We develop a conceptual model which applies this approach to the mitigation of marine megafauna by-catch in fisheries, going from defining an overarching goal with an associated quantitative target, through avoidance, minimization, remediation to offsetting. We demonstrate the framework's utility as a tool for structuring thinking and exposing uncertainties. We draw comparisons between debates ongoing in terrestrial situations and in by-catch mitigation, to show how insights from each could inform the other; these are the hierarchical nature of mitigation, out-of-kind offsets, research as an offset, incentivizing implementation of mitigation measures, societal limits and uncertainty. We explore how economic incentives could be used throughout the hierarchy to improve the achievement of by-catch goals. We conclude by highlighting the importance of clear agreed goals, of thinking beyond single species and individual jurisdictions to account for complex interactions and policy leakage, of taking uncertainty explicitly into account and of thinking creatively about approaches to by-catch mitigation in order to improve outcomes for conservation and fishers. We suggest that the framework set out here could be helpful in supporting efforts to improve by-catch mitigation efforts and highlight the need for a full empirical application to substantiate this.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1467-2960 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2337  
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