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Auteur Cahill, A.E.; De Jode, A.; Dubois, S.; Bouzaza, Z.; Aurelle, D.; Boissin, E.; Chabrol, O.; David, R.; Egea, E.; Ledoux, J.-B.; Mérigot, B.; Weber, A.A.-T.; Chenuil, A. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) A multispecies approach reveals hot spots and cold spots of diversity and connectivity in invertebrate species with contrasting dispersal modes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Mol. Ecol.  
  Volume 26 Numéro 23 Pages 6563-6577  
  Mots-Clés genetic diversity; dispersal; life-history traits; reef fishes; marine connectivity; pelagic larval duration; mediterranean sea; amphipholis-squamata; brooding brittle star; coralligenous assemblages; larvae; marine invertebrates; phylogeographical breaks; population structure; population genetic-structure; species genetic diversity correlation  
  Résumé Genetic diversity is crucial for species' maintenance and persistence, yet is often overlooked in conservation studies. Species diversity is more often reported due to practical constraints, but it is unknown if these measures of diversity are correlated. In marine invertebrates, adults are often sessile or sedentary and populations exchange genes via dispersal of gametes and larvae. Species with a larval period are expected to have more connected populations than those without larval dispersal. We assessed the relationship between measures of species and genetic diversity, and between dispersal ability and connectivity. We compiled data on genetic patterns and life history traits in nine species across five phyla. Sampling sites spanned 600km in the northwest Mediterranean Sea and focused on a 50-km area near Marseilles, France. Comparative population genetic approaches yielded three main results. (i) Species without larvae showed higher levels of genetic structure than species with free-living larvae, but the role of larval type (lecithotrophic or planktotrophic) was negligible. (ii) A narrow area around Marseilles, subject to offshore advection, limited genetic connectivity in most species. (iii) We identified sites with significant positive contributions to overall genetic diversity across all species, corresponding with areas near low human population densities. In contrast, high levels of human activity corresponded with a negative contribution to overall genetic diversity. Genetic diversity within species was positively and significantly linearly related to local species diversity. Our study suggests that local contribution to overall genetic diversity should be taken into account for future conservation strategies.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0962-1083 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2262  
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Auteur Donati, G.F.A.; Parravicini, V.; Leprieur, F.; Hagen, O.; Gaboriau, T.; Heine, C.; Kulbicki, M.; Rolland, J.; Salamin, N.; Albouy, C.; Pellissier, L. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) A process-based model supports an association between dispersal and the prevalence of species traits in tropical reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; body-size; dispersal; diversification; diversity; extinction rates; genetic-structure; geographic range size; global patterns; latitudinal gradient; mechanistic models; propagule dispersal; reef fish; speciation; traits  
  Résumé Habitat dynamics interacting with species dispersal abilities could generate gradients in species diversity and prevalence of species traits when the latter are associated with species dispersal potential. Using a process-based model of diversification constrained by a dispersal parameter, we simulated the interplay between reef habitat dynamics during the past 140 million years and dispersal, shaping lineage diversification history and assemblage composition globally. The emerging patterns from the simulations were compared to current prevalence of species traits related to dispersal for 6315 tropical reef fish species. We found a significant spatial congruence between the prevalence of simulated low dispersal values and areas with a large proportion of species characterized by small adult body size, narrow home range mobility behaviour, pelagic larval duration shorter than 21 days and diurnal activity. Species characterized by such traits were found predominantly in the Indo-Australian Archipelago and the Caribbean Sea. Furthermore, the frequency distribution of the dispersal parameter was found to match empirical distributions for body size, PLD and home range mobility behaviour. Also, the dispersal parameter in the simulations was associated to diversification rates and resulted in trait frequency matching empirical distributions. Overall, our findings suggest that past habitat dynamics, in conjunction with dispersal processes, influenced diversification in tropical reef fishes, which may explain the present-day geography of species traits.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes WOS:000487946300001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2647  
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Auteur Bax, N.J.; Miloslavich, P.; Muller-Karger, F.E.; Allain, V.; Appeltans, W.; Batten, S.D.; Benedetti-Cecchi, L.; Buttigieg, P.L.; Chiba, S.; Costa, D.P.; Duffy, J.E.; Dunn, D.C.; Johnson, C.R.; Kudela, R.M.; Obura, D.; Rebelo, L.-M.; Shin, Y.-J.; Simmons, S.E.; Tyack, P.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) A Response to Scientific and Societal Needs for Marine Biological Observations Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés capacity development; Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD); Essential Ocean Variables (EOV); Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS); Ocean observing; Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs); Un decade for sustainable development  
  Résumé Development of global ocean observing capacity for the biological EOVs is on the cusp of a step-change. Current capacity to automate data collection and processing and to integrate the resulting data streams with complementary data, openly available as FAIR data, is certain to dramatically increase the amount and quality of information and knowledge available to scientists and decision makers into the future. There is little doubt that scientists will continue to expand their understanding of what lives in the ocean, where it lives and how it is changing. However, whether this expanding information stream will inform policy and management or be incorporated into indicators for national reporting is more uncertain. Coordinated data collection including open sharing of data will help produce the consistent evidence-based messages that are valued by managers. The GOOS Biology and Ecosystems Panel is working with other global initiatives to assist this coordination by defining and implementing Essential Ocean Variables. The biological EOVs have been defined, are being updated following community feedback, and their implementation is underway. In 2019, the coverage and precision of a global ocean observing system capable of addressing key questions for the next decade will be quantified, and its potential to support the goals of the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development identified. Developing a global ocean observing system for biology and ecosystems requires parallel efforts in improving evidence-based monitoring of progress against international agreements and the open data, reporting and governance structures that would facilitate the uptake of improved information by decision makers.  
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  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2598  
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Auteur Tedesco, P.A.; Oberdorff, T.; Cornu, J.-F.; Beauchard, O.; Brosse, S.; Dürr, H.H.; Grenouillet, G.; Leprieur, F.; Tisseuil, C.; Zaiss, R.; Hugueny, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) A scenario for impacts of water availability loss due to climate change on riverine fish extinction rates Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Applied Ecology  
  Volume 50 Numéro 5 Pages 1105-1115  
  Mots-Clés aridity index; current anthropogenic threats; diversity loss; drainage area; freshwater fish diversity; habitat availability; time to extinction  
  Résumé  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1365-2664 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 405  
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Auteur Galand, P.E.; Pereira, O.; Hochart, C.; Auguet, J-C.; Debroas, D. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) A strong link between marine microbial community composition and function challenges the idea of functional redundancy Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Isme J.  
  Volume 12 Numéro 10 Pages 2470-2478  
  Mots-Clés biosphere; cell; depth; diversity; dynamics; gene; program; sequencing data; short read alignment; waters  
  Résumé Marine microbes have tremendous diversity, but a fundamental question remains unanswered: why are there so many microbial species in the sea? The idea of functional redundancy for microbial communities has long been assumed, so that the high level of richness is often explained by the presence of different taxa that are able to conduct the exact same set of metabolic processes and that can readily replace each other. Here, we refute the hypothesis of functional redundancy for marine microbial communities by showing that a shift in the community composition altered the overall functional attributes of communities across different temporal and spatial scales. Our metagenomic monitoring of a coastal northwestern Mediterranean site also revealed that diverse microbial communities harbor a high diversity of potential proteins. Working with all information given by the metagenomes (all reads) rather than relying only on known genes (annotated orthologous genes) was essential for revealing the similarity between taxonomic and functional community compositions. Our finding does not exclude the possibility for a partial redundancy where organisms that share some specific function can coexist when they differ in other ecological requirements. It demonstrates, however, that marine microbial diversity reflects a tremendous diversity of microbial metabolism and highlights the genetic potential yet to be discovered in an ocean of microbes.  
  Adresse  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
  Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur  
  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
  Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé  
  Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1751-7362 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2435  
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