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Auteur Donati, G.F.A.; Parravicini, V.; Leprieur, F.; Hagen, O.; Gaboriau, T.; Heine, C.; Kulbicki, M.; Rolland, J.; Salamin, N.; Albouy, C.; Pellissier, L. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) A process-based model supports an association between dispersal and the prevalence of species traits in tropical reef fish assemblages Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés biodiversity; body-size; dispersal; diversification; diversity; extinction rates; genetic-structure; geographic range size; global patterns; latitudinal gradient; mechanistic models; propagule dispersal; reef fish; speciation; traits  
  Résumé Habitat dynamics interacting with species dispersal abilities could generate gradients in species diversity and prevalence of species traits when the latter are associated with species dispersal potential. Using a process-based model of diversification constrained by a dispersal parameter, we simulated the interplay between reef habitat dynamics during the past 140 million years and dispersal, shaping lineage diversification history and assemblage composition globally. The emerging patterns from the simulations were compared to current prevalence of species traits related to dispersal for 6315 tropical reef fish species. We found a significant spatial congruence between the prevalence of simulated low dispersal values and areas with a large proportion of species characterized by small adult body size, narrow home range mobility behaviour, pelagic larval duration shorter than 21 days and diurnal activity. Species characterized by such traits were found predominantly in the Indo-Australian Archipelago and the Caribbean Sea. Furthermore, the frequency distribution of the dispersal parameter was found to match empirical distributions for body size, PLD and home range mobility behaviour. Also, the dispersal parameter in the simulations was associated to diversification rates and resulted in trait frequency matching empirical distributions. Overall, our findings suggest that past habitat dynamics, in conjunction with dispersal processes, influenced diversification in tropical reef fishes, which may explain the present-day geography of species traits.  
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  ISSN 0906-7590 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes WOS:000487946300001 Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2647  
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Auteur Bax, N.J.; Miloslavich, P.; Muller-Karger, F.E.; Allain, V.; Appeltans, W.; Batten, S.D.; Benedetti-Cecchi, L.; Buttigieg, P.L.; Chiba, S.; Costa, D.P.; Duffy, J.E.; Dunn, D.C.; Johnson, C.R.; Kudela, R.M.; Obura, D.; Rebelo, L.-M.; Shin, Y.-J.; Simmons, S.E.; Tyack, P.L. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) A Response to Scientific and Societal Needs for Marine Biological Observations Type Article scientifique
  Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.  
  Volume 6 Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés capacity development; Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD); Essential Ocean Variables (EOV); Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS); Ocean observing; Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs); Un decade for sustainable development  
  Résumé Development of global ocean observing capacity for the biological EOVs is on the cusp of a step-change. Current capacity to automate data collection and processing and to integrate the resulting data streams with complementary data, openly available as FAIR data, is certain to dramatically increase the amount and quality of information and knowledge available to scientists and decision makers into the future. There is little doubt that scientists will continue to expand their understanding of what lives in the ocean, where it lives and how it is changing. However, whether this expanding information stream will inform policy and management or be incorporated into indicators for national reporting is more uncertain. Coordinated data collection including open sharing of data will help produce the consistent evidence-based messages that are valued by managers. The GOOS Biology and Ecosystems Panel is working with other global initiatives to assist this coordination by defining and implementing Essential Ocean Variables. The biological EOVs have been defined, are being updated following community feedback, and their implementation is underway. In 2019, the coverage and precision of a global ocean observing system capable of addressing key questions for the next decade will be quantified, and its potential to support the goals of the UN Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development identified. Developing a global ocean observing system for biology and ecosystems requires parallel efforts in improving evidence-based monitoring of progress against international agreements and the open data, reporting and governance structures that would facilitate the uptake of improved information by decision makers.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  ISSN 2296-7745 ISBN Médium  
  Région Expédition Conférence  
  Notes Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2598  
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Auteur Tedesco, P.A.; Oberdorff, T.; Cornu, J.-F.; Beauchard, O.; Brosse, S.; Dürr, H.H.; Grenouillet, G.; Leprieur, F.; Tisseuil, C.; Zaiss, R.; Hugueny, B. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre (up) A scenario for impacts of water availability loss due to climate change on riverine fish extinction rates Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Applied Ecology  
  Volume 50 Numéro 5 Pages 1105-1115  
  Mots-Clés aridity index; current anthropogenic threats; diversity loss; drainage area; freshwater fish diversity; habitat availability; time to extinction  
  Résumé  
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  ISSN 1365-2664 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 405  
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Auteur Galand, P.E.; Pereira, O.; Hochart, C.; Auguet, J-C.; Debroas, D. doi  openurl
  Titre (up) A strong link between marine microbial community composition and function challenges the idea of functional redundancy Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Isme J.  
  Volume 12 Numéro 10 Pages 2470-2478  
  Mots-Clés biosphere; cell; depth; diversity; dynamics; gene; program; sequencing data; short read alignment; waters  
  Résumé Marine microbes have tremendous diversity, but a fundamental question remains unanswered: why are there so many microbial species in the sea? The idea of functional redundancy for microbial communities has long been assumed, so that the high level of richness is often explained by the presence of different taxa that are able to conduct the exact same set of metabolic processes and that can readily replace each other. Here, we refute the hypothesis of functional redundancy for marine microbial communities by showing that a shift in the community composition altered the overall functional attributes of communities across different temporal and spatial scales. Our metagenomic monitoring of a coastal northwestern Mediterranean site also revealed that diverse microbial communities harbor a high diversity of potential proteins. Working with all information given by the metagenomes (all reads) rather than relying only on known genes (annotated orthologous genes) was essential for revealing the similarity between taxonomic and functional community compositions. Our finding does not exclude the possibility for a partial redundancy where organisms that share some specific function can coexist when they differ in other ecological requirements. It demonstrates, however, that marine microbial diversity reflects a tremendous diversity of microbial metabolism and highlights the genetic potential yet to be discovered in an ocean of microbes.  
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  ISSN 1751-7362 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2435  
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Auteur van der Heide, T.; Govers, L.L.; de Fouw, J.; Olff, H.; van der Geest, M.; van Katwijk, M.M.; Piersma, T.; van de Koppel, J.; Silliman, B.R.; Smolders, A.J.P.; van Gils, J.A. url  openurl
  Titre (up) A three-stage symbiosis forms the foundation of seagrass ecosystems Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Science  
  Volume 336 Numéro Pages 1432-1434  
  Mots-Clés mutualistic networks zostera-marina biodiversity bivalves sulfide architecture diversity sediments bacteria mollusca  
  Résumé Seagrasses evolved from terrestrial plants into marine foundation species around 100 million years ago. Their ecological success, however, remains a mystery because natural organic matter accumulation within the beds should result in toxic sediment sulfide levels. Using a meta-analysis, a field study, and a laboratory experiment, we reveal how an ancient three-stage symbiosis between seagrass, lucinid bivalves, and their sulfide-oxidizing gill bacteria reduces sulfide stress for seagrasses. We found that the bivalve-sulfide-oxidizer symbiosis reduced sulfide levels and enhanced seagrass production as measured in biomass. In turn, the bivalves and their endosymbionts profit from organic matter accumulation and radial oxygen release from the seagrass roots. These findings elucidate the long-term success of seagrasses in warm waters and offer new prospects for seagrass ecosystem conservation.  
  Adresse [van der Heide, Tjisse; Olff, Han] Univ Groningen, CEES, Community & Conservat Ecol Grp, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. [Govers, Laura L.; van Katwijk, Marieke M.] Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Dept Environm Sci, Inst Water & Wetland Res, Fac Sci, NL-6525 AJ Nijmegen, Netherlands. [de Fouw, Jimmy; van der Geest, Matthijs; Piersma, Theunis; van Gils, Jan A.] NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. [Piersma, Theunis] Univ Groningen, CEES, Anim Ecol Grp, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. [van de Koppel, Johan] NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Ctr Estuarine & Marine Ecol, NL-4400 AC Yerseke, Netherlands. [Silliman, Brian R.] Univ Florida, Dept Biol, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA. [Smolders, Alfons J. P.] Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Inst Water & Wetland Res, Dept Aquat Ecol & Environm Biol, Fac Sci, NL-6525 AJ Nijmegen, Netherlands. van der Heide, T (reprint author), Univ Groningen, CEES, Community & Conservat Ecol Grp, POB 11103, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands t.van.der.heide@rug.nl  
  Auteur institutionnel Thèse  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  ISSN 0036-8075 ISBN Médium  
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  Notes ISI Document Delivery No.: 958BT Times Cited: 0 Cited Reference Count: 27 van der Heide, Tjisse Govers, Laura L. de Fouw, Jimmy Olff, Han van der Geest, Matthijs van Katwijk, Marieke M. Piersma, Theunis van de Koppel, Johan Silliman, Brian R. Smolders, Alfons J. P. van Gils, Jan A. “Waddenfonds” program; Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek (NWO)-WOTRO[W.01.65.221.00]; NWO-VIDI[864.09.002]; NSF; Andrew Mellon Foundation; Royal Netherlands Academy We thank G. Quaintenne and H. Blanchet for their help with the collection of Loripes; J. Eygensteyn and E. Pierson for technical assistance; and G. J. Vermeij, H. de Kroon, T. J. Bouma, E. J. Weerman, and C. Smit for their comments on the manuscript. T.v.d.H. was financially supported by the “Waddenfonds” program; M.v.d.G. and T.P. by the Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek (NWO)-WOTRO Integrated Programme grant W.01.65.221.00 awarded to T.P.; and J.d.F. and J.v.G. by the NWO-VIDI grant 864.09.002 awarded to J.v.G. B.S. was supported by an NSF CAREER award, the Andrew Mellon Foundation, and the Royal Netherlands Academy Visiting Professorship. The authors declare no conflicts of interest. A detailed description of all materials and methods, sources, as well as supplementary information are available as supplementary materials. The data are deposited in DRYAD at http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.210mp. Amer assoc advancement science Washington Approuvé pas de  
  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ 734 collection 1381  
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