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Auteur Durant, J.M.; Molinero, J.-C.; Ottersen, G.; Reygondeau, G.; Stige, L.C.; Langangen, O.
Titre (up) Contrasting effects of rising temperatures on trophic interactions in marine ecosystems Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep
Volume 9 Numéro Pages 15213
Mots-Clés biodiversity; calanus-finmarchicus; climate-change; fluctuations; life-history; mallotus-villosus; match; mismatch; phenology; thermal tolerance
Résumé In high-latitude marine environments, primary producers and their consumers show seasonal peaks of abundance in response to annual light cycle, water column stability and nutrient availability. Predatory species have adapted to this pattern by synchronising life-history events such as reproduction with prey availability. However, changing temperatures may pose unprecedented challenges by decoupling the predator-prey interactions. Here we build a predator-prey model accounting for the full life-cycle of fish and zooplankton including their phenology. The model assumes that fish production is bottom-up controlled by zooplankton prey abundance and match or mismatch between predator and prey phenology, and is parameterised based on empirical findings of how climate influences phenology and prey abundance. With this model, we project possible climate-warming effects on match-mismatch dynamics in Arcto-boreal and temperate biomes. We find a strong dependence on synchrony with zooplankton prey in the Arcto-boreal fish population, pointing towards a possible pronounced population decline with warming because of frequent desynchronization with its zooplankton prey. In contrast, the temperate fish population appears better able to track changes in prey timing and hence avoid strong population decline. These results underline that climate change may enhance the risks of predator-prey seasonal asynchrony and fish population declines at higher latitudes.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000491859500003 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2668
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Auteur Galès, A.; Triplet, S.; Geoffroy, T.; Roques, C.; Carré, C.; Le Floc’h, E.; Lanfranchi, M.; Simier, M.; Roque d’Orbcastel, E.; Przybyla, C.; Fouilland, E.
Titre (up) Control of the pH for marine microalgae polycultures: A key point for CO2 fixation improvement in intensive cultures Type Article scientifique
Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of CO2 Utilization
Volume 38 Numéro Pages 187-193
Mots-Clés Carbon yield; Microalgal diversity; pH; Predators
Résumé Recently, CO2 recycling for the production of valuable microalgae has acquired substantial interest. Most studies investigating CO2 conversion efficiency in algal cultures were based on single species, although a stabilising effect of algal diversity on biomass production was recently highlighted. However, addition of CO2 into polyalgal cultures requires a careful control of pH; performance of CO2 conversion, growth and carbon biomass production are affected by pH differently, depending on the species of microalgae. This study investigates the efficiency of CO2 conversion by natural marine algal assemblage cultivated in open, land-based raceways (4.5 m3, 10 m2), working as high rate algal ponds (HRAP). Ponds were enriched with nitrogen and phosphate, pure CO2 was added and algal cultures were grown under three different fixed pH levels: pH 6, 7 and 8. The highest conversion of photosynthetically fixed CO2 into carbon biomass (40 %) was reached at pH 7, an intermediate level, due to the partial CO2 asphyxiation of algal predators (copepods, ciliates), while being under the suboptimal conditions for the development of marine amoebae. Under this pH, the theoretical maximal biological conversion of available CO2 into carbon biomass was estimated to be 60 % in naturally inoculated open ponds.
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Langue en Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2212-9820 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2727
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Auteur Bettarel, Y.; Halary, S.; Auguet, J.-C.; Mai, T.C.; Bui, N.V.; Bouvier, T.; Got, P.; Bouvier, C.; Monteil-Bouchard, S.; Christelle, D.
Titre (up) Corallivory and the microbial debacle in two branching scleractinians Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Isme J.
Volume 12 Numéro 4 Pages 1109-1126
Mots-Clés brown band disease; coral-associated bacteria; diversity; drupella-cornus; great-barrier-reef; network analysis; red-sea; search tool; viral communities; viruses
Résumé The grazing activity by specific marine organisms represents a growing threat to the survival of many scleractinian species. For example, the recent proliferation of the corallivorous gastropod Drupella now constitutes a critical case in all South-East Asian waters. If the damaging effects caused by this marine snail on coral polyps are relatively well known, the indirect incidence of predation on coral microbial associates is still obscure and might also potentially impair coral health. In this study, we compared the main ecological traits of coral-associated bacterial and viral communities living in the mucus layer of Acropora formosa and Acropora millepora, of healthy and predated individuals (i.e., colonized by Drupella rugosa), in the Bay of Van Phong (Vietnam). Our results show a substantial impact of the gastropod on a variety of microbiological markers. Colonized corals harbored much more abundant and active epibiotic bacteria whose community composition shifted toward more pathogenic taxa (belonging to the Vibrionales, Clostridiales, Campylobacterales, and Alteromonadales orders), together with their specific phages. Viral epibionts were also greatly influenced by Drupella corallivory with spectacular modifications in their concentrations, life strategies, genotype richness, and diversity. Novel and abundant circular Rep-encoding ssDNA viruses (CRESS-DNA viruses) were detected and characterized in grazed corals and we propose that their occurrence may serve as indicator of the coral health status. Finally, our results reveal that corallivory can cause severe dysbiosis by altering virus-bacteria interactions in the mucus layer, and ultimately favoring the development of local opportunistic infections.
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Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 1751-7362 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2325
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Auteur Montano, S.; Fattorini, S.; Parravicini, V.; Berumen, M.L.; Galli, P.; Maggioni, D.; Arrigoni, R.; Seveso, D.; Strona, G.
Titre (up) Corals hosting symbiotic hydrozoans are less susceptible to predation and disease Type Article scientifique
Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Proc. R. Soc. B-Biol. Sci.
Volume 284 Numéro 1869 Pages 20172405
Mots-Clés diversity; climate change; climate-change; great-barrier-reef; coral reefs; association; scleractinian corals; cnidaria; 1st record; acanthaster; bleaching; co-evolution; drupella; Drupella; zanclea
Résumé In spite of growing evidence that climate change may dramatically affect networks of interacting species, whether- and to what extent-ecological interactions can mediate species' responses to disturbances is an open question. Here we show how a largely overseen association such as that between hydrozoans and scleractinian corals could be possibly associated with a reduction in coral susceptibility to ever-increasing predator and disease outbreaks. We examined 2455 scleractinian colonies (from both Maldivian and the Saudi Arabian coral reefs) searching for non-random patterns in the occurrence of hydrozoans on corals showing signs of different health conditions (i.e. bleaching, algal overgrowth, corallivory and different coral diseases). We show that, after accounting for geographical, ecological and co-evolutionary factors, signs of disease and corallivory are significantly lower in coral colonies hosting hydrozoans than in hydrozoan-free ones. This finding has important implications for our understanding of the ecology of coral reefs, and for their conservation in the current scenario of global change, because it suggests that symbiotic hydrozoans may play an active role in protecting their scleractinian hosts from stresses induced by warming water temperatures.
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Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 0962-8452 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2258
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Auteur Kermagoret, C.; Claudet, J.; Derolez, V.; Nugues, M.M.; Ouisse, V.; Quillien, N.; Bailly, D.
Titre (up) Dataset on marine ecosystem services supplied by coral reefs, sandy beaches and coastal lagoons in different eutrophication states Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Data Brief
Volume 25 Numéro Pages 104078
Mots-Clés dinoflagellate; Ecosystem services; Eutrophication; Marine biodiversity; Marine ecosystems; patterns
Résumé This data article provides indicators of Ecosystem Service (ES) supply for coral reefs, sandy beaches and coastal lagoons in different ecological states regarding eutrophication. 14 ES are considered: food through fisheries; material; molecules; coastal protection; nutrient regulation; pathogen regulation; climate regulation; support of recreational and leisure activities; contribution to a pleasant landscape; contribution to culture and territorial identity; emblematic biodiversity; habitat; trophic networks; recruitment. For each ecosystem 3 to 4 eutrophication states are described. Indicators of ES supply are filled on the basis of a literature review supplemented with expert-knowledge. A semi-quantification of the indicator value is finally provided. Tendencies and trade-offs between ES are analyzed in How does eutrophication impact bundles of ecosystem services in multiple coastal habitats using state-and-transition models [1]. (c) 2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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Auteur institutionnel Thèse
Editeur Lieu de Publication Éditeur
Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original
Éditeur de collection Titre de collection Titre de collection Abrégé
Volume de collection Numéro de collection Edition
ISSN 2352-3409 ISBN Médium
Région Expédition Conférence
Notes WOS:000495104500105 Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2680
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