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Auteur van der Heide, T.; Govers, L.L.; de Fouw, J.; Olff, H.; van der Geest, M.; van Katwijk, M.M.; Piersma, T.; van de Koppel, J.; Silliman, B.R.; Smolders, A.J.P.; van Gils, J.A.
Titre (up) A three-stage symbiosis forms the foundation of seagrass ecosystems Type Article scientifique
Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Science
Volume 336 Numéro Pages 1432-1434
Mots-Clés mutualistic networks zostera-marina biodiversity bivalves sulfide architecture diversity sediments bacteria mollusca
Résumé Seagrasses evolved from terrestrial plants into marine foundation species around 100 million years ago. Their ecological success, however, remains a mystery because natural organic matter accumulation within the beds should result in toxic sediment sulfide levels. Using a meta-analysis, a field study, and a laboratory experiment, we reveal how an ancient three-stage symbiosis between seagrass, lucinid bivalves, and their sulfide-oxidizing gill bacteria reduces sulfide stress for seagrasses. We found that the bivalve-sulfide-oxidizer symbiosis reduced sulfide levels and enhanced seagrass production as measured in biomass. In turn, the bivalves and their endosymbionts profit from organic matter accumulation and radial oxygen release from the seagrass roots. These findings elucidate the long-term success of seagrasses in warm waters and offer new prospects for seagrass ecosystem conservation.
Adresse [van der Heide, Tjisse; Olff, Han] Univ Groningen, CEES, Community & Conservat Ecol Grp, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. [Govers, Laura L.; van Katwijk, Marieke M.] Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Dept Environm Sci, Inst Water & Wetland Res, Fac Sci, NL-6525 AJ Nijmegen, Netherlands. [de Fouw, Jimmy; van der Geest, Matthijs; Piersma, Theunis; van Gils, Jan A.] NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Dept Marine Ecol, NL-1790 AB Den Burg, Texel, Netherlands. [Piersma, Theunis] Univ Groningen, CEES, Anim Ecol Grp, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands. [van de Koppel, Johan] NIOZ Royal Netherlands Inst Sea Res, Ctr Estuarine & Marine Ecol, NL-4400 AC Yerseke, Netherlands. [Silliman, Brian R.] Univ Florida, Dept Biol, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA. [Smolders, Alfons J. P.] Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Inst Water & Wetland Res, Dept Aquat Ecol & Environm Biol, Fac Sci, NL-6525 AJ Nijmegen, Netherlands. van der Heide, T (reprint author), Univ Groningen, CEES, Community & Conservat Ecol Grp, POB 11103, NL-9700 CC Groningen, Netherlands t.van.der.heide@rug.nl
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Notes ISI Document Delivery No.: 958BT Times Cited: 0 Cited Reference Count: 27 van der Heide, Tjisse Govers, Laura L. de Fouw, Jimmy Olff, Han van der Geest, Matthijs van Katwijk, Marieke M. Piersma, Theunis van de Koppel, Johan Silliman, Brian R. Smolders, Alfons J. P. van Gils, Jan A. “Waddenfonds” program; Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek (NWO)-WOTRO[W.01.65.221.00]; NWO-VIDI[864.09.002]; NSF; Andrew Mellon Foundation; Royal Netherlands Academy We thank G. Quaintenne and H. Blanchet for their help with the collection of Loripes; J. Eygensteyn and E. Pierson for technical assistance; and G. J. Vermeij, H. de Kroon, T. J. Bouma, E. J. Weerman, and C. Smit for their comments on the manuscript. T.v.d.H. was financially supported by the “Waddenfonds” program; M.v.d.G. and T.P. by the Nederlandse Organisatie voor Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek (NWO)-WOTRO Integrated Programme grant W.01.65.221.00 awarded to T.P.; and J.d.F. and J.v.G. by the NWO-VIDI grant 864.09.002 awarded to J.v.G. B.S. was supported by an NSF CAREER award, the Andrew Mellon Foundation, and the Royal Netherlands Academy Visiting Professorship. The authors declare no conflicts of interest. A detailed description of all materials and methods, sources, as well as supplementary information are available as supplementary materials. The data are deposited in DRYAD at http://dx.doi.org/10.5061/dryad.210mp. Amer assoc advancement science Washington Approuvé pas de
Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ 734 collection 1381
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Auteur Escalas, A.; Bouvier, T.; Mouchet, M.A.; Leprieur, F.; Bouvier, C.; Troussellier, M.; Mouillot, D.
Titre (up) A unifying quantitative framework for exploring the multiple facets of microbial biodiversity across diverse scales Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Environmental microbiology
Volume 15 Numéro 10 Pages 2642-2657
Mots-Clés Microbial communities; Rao quadratic entropy; metagenomic; microbial biodiversity; molecular fingerprint; β diversity
Résumé Recent developments of molecular tools have revolutionized our knowledge of microbial biodiversity by allowing detailed exploration of its different facets and generating unprecedented amount of data. One key issue with such large datasets is the development of diversity measures that cope with different data outputs and allow comparison of biodiversity across different scales. Diversity has indeed three components: local (alpha), regional (gamma) and the overall difference between local communities (beta). Current measures of microbial diversity, derived from several approaches, provide complementary but different views. They only capture the beta component of diversity, compare communities in a pairwise way, consider all species as equivalent or lack a mathematically explicit relationship among the alpha, beta and gamma components. We propose a unified quantitative framework based on the Rao quadratic entropy, to obtain an additive decomposition of diversity (gamma = alpha + beta), so the three components can be compared, and that integrate the relationship (phylogenetic or functional) among Microbial Diversity Units that compose a microbial community. We show how this framework is adapted to all types of molecular data, and we highlight crucial issues in microbial ecology that would benefit from this framework and propose ready-to-use R-functions to easily set up our approach.
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Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 430
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Auteur Patino, J.; Guilhaumon, F.; Whittaker, R.J.; Triantis, K.A.; Gradstein, S.R.; Hedenas, L.; Gonzalez-Mancebo, J.M.; Vanderpoorten, A.
Titre (up) Accounting for data heterogeneity in patterns of biodiversity: an application of linear mixed effect models to the oceanic island biogeography of spore-producing plants Type Article scientifique
Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography
Volume 36 Numéro 8 Pages 904-913
Mots-Clés area; bryophytes; diversification; diversity; evolution; genetic-structure; moss; richness; scale; speciation
Résumé The general dynamic model of oceanic island biogeography describes the evolution of species diversity properties, including species richness (SR), through time. We investigate the hypothesis that SR in organisms with high dispersal capacities is better predicted by island area and elevation (as a surrogate of habitat diversity) than by time elapsed since island emergence and geographic isolation. Linear mixed effect models (LMMs) subjected to information theoretic model selection were employed to describe moss and liverwort SR patterns from 67 oceanic islands across 12 archipelagos. Random effects, which are used to modulate model parameters to take differences among archipelagos into account, included only a random intercept in the best-fit model for liverworts and in one of the two best-fit models for mosses. In this case, the other coefficients are constant across archipelagos, and we interpret the intercept as a measure of the intrinsic carrying capacity of islands within each archipelago, independently of their size, age, elevation and geographic isolation. The contribution of area and elevation to the models was substantially higher than that of time, with the least contribution made by measures of geographic isolation. This reinforces the idea that oceanic barriers are not a major impediment for migration in bryophytes and, together with the almost complete absence of in situ insular diversification, explains the comparatively limited importance of time in the models. We hence suggest that time per se has little independent role in explaining bryophyte SR and principally features as a variable accounting for the changing area and topographic complexity during the life-cycle of oceanic islands. Simple area models reflecting habitat availability and diversity might hence prevail over more complex temporal models reflecting in-situ speciation and dispersal (time, geographic connectivity) in explaining patterns of biodiversity for exceptionally mobile organisms.
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Auteur Zhao, T.; Villeger, S.; Cucherousset, J.
Titre (up) Accounting for intraspecific diversity when examining relationships between non-native species and functional diversity Type Article scientifique
Année 2019 Publication Revue Abrégée Oecologia
Volume 189 Numéro 1 Pages 171-183
Mots-Clés fish; Intraspecific variability; size; disturbance; Non-native species; phenotypic plasticity; Functional diversity; reveals; catfish silurus-glanis; coexistence; Community assembly; energy relationships; Functional traits; success; trait variability
Résumé Quantifying changes in functional diversity, the facet of biodiversity accounting for the biological features of organisms, has been advocated as one of the most integrative ways to unravel how communities are affected by human-induced perturbations. The present study assessed how functional diversity patterns varied among communities that differed in the degree to which non-native species dominated the community in temperate lake fish communities and whether accounting for intraspecific functional variability could provide a better understanding of the variation of functional diversity across communities. Four functional diversity indices were computed for 18 temperate lake fish communities along a gradient of non-native fish dominance using morphological functional traits assessed for each life-stage within each species. First, we showed that intraspecific variability in functional traits was high and comparable to interspecific variability. Second, we found that non-native fish were functionally distinct from native fish. Finally, we demonstrated that there was a significant relationship between functional diversity and the degree to which non-native fish currently dominated the community and that this association could be better detected when accounting for intraspecific functional variability. These findings highlighted the importance of incorporating intraspecific variability to better quantify the variation of functional diversity patterns in communities facing human-induced perturbations.
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ISSN 0029-8549 ISBN Médium
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Auteur Muller-Karger, F.E.; Miloslavich, P.; Bax, N.J.; Simmons, S.; Costello, M.J.; Sousa Pinto, I.; Canonico, G.; Turner, W.; Gill, M.; Montes, E.; Best, B.D.; Pearlman, J.; Halpin, P.; Dunn, D.; Benson, A.; Martin, C.S.; Weatherdon, L.V.; Appeltans, W.; Provoost, P.; Klein, E.; Kelble, C.R.; Miller, R.J.; Chavez, F.P.; Iken, K.; Chiba, S.; Obura, D.; Navarro, L.M.; Pereira, H.M.; Allain, V.; Batten, S.; Benedetti-Checchi, L.; Duffy, J.E.; Kudela, R.M.; Rebelo, L.-M.; Shin, Y.; Geller, G.
Titre (up) Advancing Marine Biological Observations and Data Requirements of the Complementary Essential Ocean Variables (EOVs) and Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) Frameworks Type Article scientifique
Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci.
Volume 5 Numéro Pages
Mots-Clés Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs); Essential Ocean Variables (EOV); Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS); Integrated Marine Biosphere Research (IMBeR); Marine Biodiversity Observation Network (MBON); Marine Global Earth Observatory (MarineGEO); Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS)
Résumé Measurements of the status and trends of key indicators for the ocean and marine life are required to inform policy and management in the context of growing human uses of marine resources, coastal development, and climate change. Two synergistic efforts identify specific priority variables for monitoring: Essential Ocean Variables (EOVs) through the Global Ocean Observing System (GOOS), and Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) from the Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON). Both systems support reporting against internationally agreed conventions and treaties. GOOS, established under the auspices of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC), plays a leading role in coordinating global monitoring of the ocean and in the definition of EOVs. GEO BON is a global biodiversity observation network that coordinates observations to enhance management of the world’s biodiversity and promote both the awareness and accounting of ecosystem services. Convergence and agreement between these two efforts are required to streamline existing and new marine observation programs to advance scientific knowledge effectively and to support the sustainable use and management of ocean spaces and resources. In this context, the Marine Biodiversity Observation Network (MBON), a thematic component of GEO BON, is collaborating with GOOS, the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS), and the Integrated Marine Biosphere Research (IMBeR) project to ensure that EBVs and EOVs are complementary, representing alternative uses of a common set of scientific measurements. This work is informed by the Joint Technical Commission for Oceanography and Marine Meteorology (JCOMM), an intergovernmental body of technical experts that helps international coordination on best practices for observing, data management and services, combined with capacity development expertise. Characterizing biodiversity and understanding its drivers will require incorporation of observations from traditional and molecular taxonomy, animal tagging and tracking efforts, ocean biogeochemistry, and ocean observatory initiatives including the deep ocean and seafloor. The partnership between large-scale ocean observing and product distribution initiatives (MBON, OBIS, JCOMM, and GOOS) is an expedited, effective way to support international policy-level assessments (e.g., the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services or IPBES), along with the implementation of international development goals (e.g., the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals).
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