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Auteur Auguet, J.C.; Montanie, H.; Hartmann, H.J.; Lebaron, P.; Casamayor, E.O.; Catala, P.; Delmas, D. doi  openurl
  Titre (down) Potential effect of freshwater virus on the structure and activity of bacterial communities in the Marennes-Oleron Bay (France) Type Article scientifique
  Année 2009 Publication Revue Abrégée Microb Ecol  
  Volume 57 Numéro 2 Pages 295-306  
  Mots-Clés 16S/genetics Seasons Seawater/microbiology/virology Viruses/*growth & development *Water Microbiology; Bacteria/genetics/*growth & development/*virology Biodiversity Colony Count; Bacterial/genetics France Fresh Water/virology Polymorphism; Microbial DNA Fingerprinting DNA; Ribosomal; Single-Stranded Conformational Population Dynamics RNA  
  Résumé Batch culture experiments using viral enrichment were conducted to test the response of a coastal bacterial community to autochthonous (i.e., co-existing) or allochthonous riverine viruses. The effects of viral infections on bacterial dynamics and activity were assessed by epifluorescence microscopy and thymidine incorporation, respectively, whereas the effect of viral infection on bacterial community composition was examined by polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism 16S ribosomal RNA fingerprinting. The percentages of high nucleic acid-containing cells, evaluated by flow cytometry, were significantly correlated (r2=0.91, n=12, p<0.0001) to bacterial production, making this value a good predictor of active cell dynamics along the study. While confinement and temperature were the two principal experimental factors affecting bacterial community composition and dynamics, respectively, additions of freshwater viruses had significant effects on coastal bacterial communities. Thus, foreign viruses significantly reduced net bacterial population increase as compared to the enrichment treated with inactivated virus. Moreover, freshwater viruses recurrently and specifically affected bacterial community composition, as compared to addition of autochthonous viruses. In most cases, the combined treatment viruses and freshwater dissolved organic matter helped to maintain or even enhance species richness in coastal bacterial communities in agreement to the 'killing the winner' hypothesis. Thus, riverine virus input could potentially influence bacterial community composition of the coastal bay albeit with modest modification of bulk bacterial growth.  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1301  
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Auteur Ramirez-Romero, E.; Molinero, J.C.; Sommer, U.; Salhi, N.; Yahia, O.K.-D.; Yahia, M.N.D. doi  openurl
  Titre (down) Phytoplankton size changes and diversity loss in the southwestern Mediterranean Sea in relation to long-term hydrographic variability Type Article scientifique
  Année 2020 Publication Revue Abrégée Estuar. Coast. Shelf Sci.  
  Volume 235 Numéro Pages 106574  
  Mots-Clés bay; climate-change; Diversity loss; dynamics; evolution; jellyfish; marine; Nanophytoplankton; Ocean warming; patterns; Phytoplankton diversity; plankton communities; Size structural changes; Southwestern mediterranean; temperature; time-series  
  Résumé Structural changes in plankton primary producers have large implications for food web dynamics, energy fluxes and the vertical export of biogenic particulate carbon. Here we examine phytoplankton data spanning the period 1993-2008 from the Bay of Tunis, southwestern Mediterranean Sea, in relation to long term hydroclimate variability. We show a conspicuous shift in the structure of the phytoplankton community characterized by an increase of small-sized species and diversity loss, revealing a dominance of smaller blooming diatoms and cyanobacteria. Such changes were concurrent with marked modifications in hydroclimatic patterns experienced in the Bay of Tunis consisting of a shift towards enhanced winter precipitation together with rising temperatures. This novel study shows an overall rise in the proportion of small phytoplankton cells and a decreasing trend in phytoplankton diversity in the southern Mediterranean area. These findings warn of a potential decline of trophic efficiency and lesser food web stability resulting from mean size reduction and the diversity loss.  
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  ISSN 0272-7714 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 2766  
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Auteur Barberan, A.; Fernandez-Guerra, A.; Auguet, J.C.; Galand, P.E.; Casamayor, E.O. doi  openurl
  Titre (down) Phylogenetic ecology of widespread uncultured clades of the Kingdom Euryarchaeota Type Article scientifique
  Année 2011 Publication Revue Abrégée Mol Ecol  
  Volume 20 Numéro 9 Pages 1988-1996  
  Mots-Clés 16S/genetics Sequence Analysis; Biodiversity Databases; dna; Genetic *Ecosystem Environment Euryarchaeota/*classification/*genetics Genes; Ribosomal; rRNA/*genetics Phylogeny RNA  
  Résumé Despite its widespread distribution and high levels of phylogenetic diversity, microbes are poorly understood creatures. We applied a phylogenetic ecology approach in the Kingdom Euryarchaeota (Archaea) to gain insight into the environmental distribution and evolutionary history of one of the most ubiquitous and largely unknown microbial groups. We compiled 16S rRNA gene sequences from our own sequence libraries and public genetic databases for two of the most widespread mesophilic Euryarchaeota clades, Lake Dagow Sediment (LDS) and Rice Cluster-V (RC-V). The inferred population history indicated that both groups have undergone specific nonrandom evolution within environments, with several noteworthy habitat transition events. Remarkably, the LDS and RC-V groups had enormous levels of genetic diversity when compared with other microbial groups, and proliferation of sequences within each single clade was accompanied by significant ecological differentiation. Additionally, the freshwater Euryarchaeota counterparts unexpectedly showed high phylogenetic diversity, possibly promoted by their environmental adaptability and the heterogeneous nature of freshwater ecosystems. The temporal phylogenetic diversification pattern of these freshwater Euryarchaeota was concentrated both in early times and recently, similarly to other much less diverse but deeply sampled archaeal groups, further stressing that their genetic diversity is a function of environment plasticity. For the vast majority of living beings on Earth (i.e. the uncultured microorganisms), how they differ in the genetic or physiological traits used to exploit the environmental resources is largely unknown. Inferring population history from 16S rRNA gene-based molecular phylogenies under an ecological perspective may shed light on the intriguing relationships between lineage, environment, evolution and diversity in the microbial world.  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1305  
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Auteur Loiseau, N.; Legras, G.; Gaertner, J.-C.; Verley, P.; Chabanet, P.; Mérigot, B. url  doi
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  Titre (down) Performance of partitioning functional beta-diversity indices: Influence of functional representation and partitioning methods Type Article scientifique
  Année 2017 Publication Revue Abrégée Global Ecol. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 26 Numéro 6 Pages 753-762  
  Mots-Clés assembly rules; Beta diversity; indices; nestedness-resultant dissimilarity; partitioning; replacement; richness difference; turnover  
  Résumé Aim Two frameworks (BASVIL and PODCAR), based on two different functional representations (ordination and dendrogram), have been proposed for partitioning overall functional beta diversity into two analogous components: turnover and nestedness-resultant dissimilarity, or replacement and difference of functional richness, respectively. We compared the two frameworks by testing the influence of functional representations and partitioning methods on the measurement of overall functional beta diversity and its components. Innovation We computed beta-diversity indices from the two frameworks on a set of communities simulated according to five scenarios of assembly: random, richness gradient, pure nestedness, pure turnover and mixed turnover/loss scenarios. To disentangle the effects of the partitioning approach and those of the functional representation on measurement of functional beta diversity, we also computed PODCAR indices in multidimensional space. Main conclusions BASVIL and PODCAR frameworks led to different results for overall functional beta diversity and their analogous partitioning components. Most of the difference between the two frameworks was due to the functional representation used. The goodness-of-fit measure (mean squared deviation, mSD) to assess the quality of functional spaces showed that the one computed on the basis of the dendrogram used in PODCAR remained lower than that of the functional ordination considered in BASVIL. In addition, only functional turnover derived from the BASVIL framework is independent of difference in functional richness. Finally, BASVIL measured functional variations derived from nested phenomena while PODCAR did not allow separation of this variation derived from richness difference. However, the sensitivity of BASVIL to functionally extreme species may make it difficult to know whether variations of the nestedness-resultant dissimilarity components are due to a turnover with few extreme species or a loss in functional richness. Particular attention with regard to the properties of the two frameworks is required before drawing conclusions regarding processes that structure communities.  
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  ISSN 1466-8238 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 2136  
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Auteur Evans, S.M.; McKenna, C.; Simpson, S.D.; Tournois, J.; Genner, M.J. doi  openurl
  Titre (down) Patterns of species range evolution in Indo-Pacific reef assemblages reveal the Coral Triangle as a net source of transoceanic diversity Type Article scientifique
  Année 2016 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Lett.  
  Volume 12 Numéro 6 Pages 20160090  
  Mots-Clés Bayesian skyline plot; biogeography; climate change; coral reef; fishes global patterns; marine biodiversity; ocean; phylogeography; refugia; species distributions  
  Résumé The Coral Triangle in the Indo-Pacific is a region renowned for exceptional marine biodiversity. The area could have acted as a 'centre of origin' where speciation has been prolific or a 'centre of survival' by providing refuge during major environmental shifts such as sea-level changes. The region could also have acted as a 'centre of accumulation' for species with origins outside of the Coral Triangle, owing to it being at a central position between the Indian and Pacific oceans. Here, we investigated support for these hypotheses using population-level DNA sequence-based reconstructions of the range evolution of 45 species (314 populations) of Indo-Pacific reef-associated organisms. Our results show that populations undergoing the most ancient establishment were significantly more likely to be closer to the centre of the Coral Triangle than to peripheral locations. The data are consistent with the Coral Triangle being a net source of coral-reef biodiversity for the Indo-Pacific region, suggesting that the region has acted primarily as a centre of survival, a centre of origin or both. These results provide evidence of how a key location can influence the large-scale distributions of biodiversity over evolutionary timescales.  
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  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection 1694  
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