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Auteur Le Chevanton, M.; Garnier, M.; Bougaran, G.; Schreiber, N.; Lukomska, E.; Bérard, J.B.; Fouilland, E.; Bernard, O.; Cadoret, J.P. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Screening and selection of growth-promoting bacteria for Dunaliella cultures Type Article scientifique
  Année 2013 Publication Revue Abrégée Algal Research  
  Volume 2 Numéro Pages 212-222  
  Mots-Clés Bacterial diversity; Dunaliella; Interaction; bacteria; microalgae  
  Résumé  
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  Langue Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection (down) Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 2211-9264 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 815  
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Auteur Hattab, T.; Albouy, C.; Lasram, F.B.; Le Loc'h, F.; Guilhaumon, F.; Leprieur, F. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre A biogeographical regionalization of coastal Mediterranean fishes Type Article scientifique
  Année 2015 Publication Revue Abrégée Journal of Biogeography  
  Volume 42 Numéro 7 Pages 1336-1348  
  Mots-Clés Beta diversity; Biogeography; bioregionalization; coastal fishes; compositional turnover; environmental gradient; historical processes; Mediterranean Sea; phylogenetic turnover; species composition  
  Résumé AimTo delineate the biogeographical regions of the continental shelf of the Mediterranean Sea based on the spatial distributions of coastal marine fishes and their evolutionary relationships, with a view to furthering our capacity to answer basic and applied biogeographical, ecological and evolutionary questions. LocationMediterranean Sea. MethodsWe used a dataset summarizing the occurrences of 203 coastal Mediterranean fishes (0.1 degrees resolution grid system) and a molecular phylogenetic tree to quantify both compositional and phylogenetic dissimilarity (or beta diversity) between cells. We then applied multivariate analyses to delineate biogeographical regions and to evaluate how they related to broad-scale environmental gradients. We also assessed the differences between the biogeographical regions identified using phylogenetic beta diversity versus those obtained using compositional beta diversity. ResultsThe bioregionalization schemes based on phylogenetic and compositional beta diversity identified broadly similar regions, each consisting of six distinct pools of coastal fishes. Clear separations between northern and southern regions were observed, as well as a disjunct between inshore and offshore areas. These beta diversity patterns were mainly related to a north-south gradient in sea-surface temperature and bathymetric constraints. Main conclusionsIncorporating phylogenetic information into the measurement of beta diversity did not offer further insights to the bioregionalization scheme based solely on compositional beta diversity. This suggests that evolutionary and historical processes played only a minor role in shaping the contemporary patterns of beta diversity in the Mediterranean coastal fish fauna. However, our results support the view that contemporary environmental conditions play a major role in determining the distribution of these species.  
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  Volume de collection (down) Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0305-0270 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 1331  
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Auteur Caro, A.; Escalas, A.; Bouvier, C.; Grousset, E.; Lautredou-Audouy, N.; Roques, C.; Charmantier, M.; Gros, O. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Epibiotic bacterial community of Sphaeroma serratum (Crustacea, Isopoda): relationship with molt status Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Mar. Ecol.-Prog. Ser.  
  Volume 457 Numéro Pages 11-27  
  Mots-Clés 16s ribosomal-rna; Crustacean; DGGE band pattern; Epibiotic biofilm; Molt cycle; Sphaeroma; fish; gastropod; gradient gel-electrophoresis; hydrothermal-vent; in-situ hybridization; mid-atlantic ridge; oxidizing bacteria; phylogenetic diversity; riftia-pachyptila; shrimp rimicaris-exoculata; urothoe-poseidonis  
  Résumé Sphaeroma serratum is a marine isopod species that inhabits seashores from Europe to West Africa. The individuals live under stones in direct contact with reduced sediments and harbour a diverse bacterial community on the cuticle of their pleopods. We investigated the diversity of these epibiotic bacteria on male (pubescent and senescent) and female specimens with electron microscopic observations and molecular tools. The microbial community of S. serratum was shown to be composed of at least 5 bacterial morphotypes observed on the pleopodal cuticle in all male specimens. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we identified 5 major phylogenetic groups (alpha-, beta-, gamma- and delta-Proteobacteria and Archaea) whereas denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments of epibiotic bacteria revealed 50 bands. The bacterial community associated with S. serratum seems more diverse than in other marine crustaceans, such as Rimicaris. The relative diversity of this bacterial community was also studied in relation to the molt cycle. The comparison of DGGE band patterns of several individuals from female, pubescent male and senescent male groups revealed that the bacterial community diversity was dependent on the sex and the age of the individuals and more generally on the molt status.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection (down) Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 0171-8630 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 564  
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Auteur Pommier, T.; Douzery, E.J.P.; Mouillot, D. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Environment drives high phylogenetic turnover among oceanic bacterial communities Type Article scientifique
  Année 2012 Publication Revue Abrégée Biol. Lett.  
  Volume 8 Numéro 4 Pages 562-566  
  Mots-Clés Biogeography; connectivity; diversity; dynamics; patterns; phylogenetic turnover  
  Résumé Although environmental filtering has been observed to influence the biodiversity patterns of marine bacterial communities, it was restricted to the regional scale and to the species level, leaving the main drivers unknown at large biogeographic scales and higher taxonomic levels. Bacterial communities with different species compositions may nevertheless share phylogenetic lineages, and phylogenetic turnover (PT) among those communities may be surprisingly low along any biogeographic or environmental gradient. Here, we investigated the relative influence of environmental filtering and geographical distance on the PT between marine bacterial communities living more than 8000 km apart in contrasted abiotic conditions. PT was high between communities and was more structured by local environmental factors than by geographical distance, suggesting the predominance of a lineage filtering process. Strong phenotype-environment mismatches observed in the ocean may surpass high connectivity between marine microbial communities.  
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  Langue English Langue du Résumé Titre Original  
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  Volume de collection (down) Numéro de collection Edition  
  ISSN 1744-9561 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ isabelle.vidal-ayouba @ collection 567  
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Auteur Katsanevakis, S.; Coll, M.; Piroddi, C.; Steenbeek, J.; Ben Rais Lasram, F.; Zenetos, A.; Cardoso, A.C. url  doi
openurl 
  Titre Invading the Mediterranean Sea: biodiversity patterns shaped by human activities Type Article scientifique
  Année 2014 Publication Revue Abrégée Front. Mar. Sci  
  Volume 1 Numéro Pages  
  Mots-Clés alien species; Aquaculture; biodiversity patterns; biological invasions; Lessepsian migrants; pathways; shipping  
  Résumé Human activities, such as shipping, aquaculture, and the opening of the Suez Canal, have led to the introduction of nearly 1000 alien species into the Mediterranean Sea. We investigated how human activities, by providing pathways for the introduction of alien species, may shape the biodiversity patterns in the Mediterranean Sea. Richness of Red Sea species introduced through the Suez Canal (Lessepsian species) is very high along the eastern Mediterranean coastline, reaching a maximum of 129 species per 100 km2, and declines toward the north and west. The distribution of species introduced by shipping is strikingly different, with several hotspot areas occurring throughout the Mediterranean basin. Two main hotspots for aquaculture-introduced species are observed (the Thau and Venice lagoons). Certain taxonomic groups were mostly introduced through specific pathways—fish through the Suez Canal, macrophytes by aquaculture, and invertebrates through the Suez Canal and by shipping. Hence, the local taxonomic identity of the alien species was greatly dependent on the dominant maritime activities/interventions and the related pathways of introduction. The composition of alien species differs among Mediterranean ecoregions; such differences are greater for Lessepsian and aquaculture-introduced species. The spatial pattern of native species biodiversity differs from that of alien species: the overall richness of native species declines from the north-western to the south-eastern regions, while the opposite trend is observed for alien species. The biodiversity of the Mediterranean Sea is changing, and further research is needed to better understand how the new biodiversity patterns shaped by human activities will affect the Mediterranean food webs, ecosystem functioning, and the provision of ecosystem services.  
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  Numéro d'Appel collection 313  
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