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Auteur Jaspers, C.; Huwer, B.; Antajan, E.; Hosia, A.; Hinrichsen, H.-H.; Biastoch, A.; Angel, D.; Asmus, R.; Augustin, C.; Bagheri, S.; Beggs, S.E.; Balsby, T.J.S.; Boersma, M.; Bonnet, D.; Christensen, J.T.; Daenhardt, A.; Delpy, F.; Falkenhaug, T.; Finenko, G.; Fleming, N.E.C.; Fuentes, V.; Galil, B.; Gittenberger, A.; Griffin, D.C.; Haslob, H.; Javidpour, J.; Kamburska, L.; Kube, S.; Langenberg, V.T.; Lehtiniemi, M.; Lombard, F.; Malzahn, A.; Marambio, M.; Mihneva, V.; Moller, L.F.; Niermann, U.; Okyar, M.I.; Ozdemir, Z.B.; Pitois, S.; Reusch, T.B.H.; Robbens, J.; Stefanova, K.; Thibault, D.; van der Veer, H.W.; Vansteenbrugge, L.; van Walraven, L.; Wozniczka, A. doi  openurl
  Titre Ocean current connectivity propelling the secondary spread of a marine invasive comb jelly across western Eurasia Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Glob. Ecol. Biogeogr.  
  Volume 27 Numéro 7 Pages 814-827  
  Mots-Clés abundance; biodiversity; biological invasions; black-sea; caspian sea; consequences; ctenophore mnemiopsis-leidyi; gelatinous zooplankton; invasion corridors; invasive species; jellyfish; larval transport; marine connectivity; Mnemiopsis leidyi; north-sea; range expansion; source populations; source-sink dynamics; waters; zooplankton  
  Résumé Aim: Invasive species are of increasing global concern. Nevertheless, the mechanisms driving further distribution after the initial establishment of non-native species remain largely unresolved, especially in marine systems. Ocean currents can be a major driver governing range occupancy, but this has not been accounted for in most invasion ecology studies so far. We investigate how well initial establishment areas are interconnected to later occupancy regions to test for the potential role of ocean currents driving secondary spread dynamics in order to infer invasion corridors and the source-sink dynamics of a non-native holoplanktonic biological probe species on a continental scale. Location: Western Eurasia. Time period: 1980s-2016. Major taxa studied: 'Comb jelly' Mnemiopsis leidyi. Methods: Based on 12,400 geo-referenced occurrence data, we reconstruct the invasion history of M. leidyi in western Eurasia. We model ocean currents and calculate their stability to match the temporal and spatial spread dynamics with large-scale connectivity patterns via ocean currents. Additionally, genetic markers are used to test the predicted connectivity between subpopulations. Results: Ocean currents can explain secondary spread dynamics, matching observed range expansions and the timing of first occurrence of our holoplanktonic non-native biological probe species, leading to invasion corridors in western Eurasia. In northern Europe, regional extinctions after cold winters were followed by rapid recolonizations at a speed of up to 2,000 km per season. Source areas hosting year-round populations in highly interconnected regions can re-seed genotypes over large distances after local extinctions. Main conclusions: Although the release of ballast water from container ships may contribute to the dispersal of non-native species, our results highlight the importance of ocean currents driving secondary spread dynamics. Highly interconnected areas hosting invasive species are crucial for secondary spread dynamics on a continental scale. Invasion risk assessments should consider large-scale connectivity patterns and the potential source regions of non-native marine species.  
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Auteur Bettarel, Y.; Combe, M.; Adingra, A.; Ndiaye, A.; Bouvier, T.; Panfili, J.; Durand, J.-D. doi  openurl
  Titre Hordes of Phages in the Gut of the Tilapia Sarotherodon melanotheron Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep  
  Volume 8 Numéro Pages 11311  
  Mots-Clés bacterial communities; diversity; fish gut; host; microbiome; physiology; virome; viruses; xenobiotics  
  Résumé Preliminary studies conducted on the human gastro-intestinal tract have revealed that enteric viral communities play a preponderant role in microbial homeostatis. However to date, such communities have never been investigated in the fish gut. Herein, we examined the main ecological traits of viruses in the digestive tract of a euryhaline fish, the tilapia Sarotherodon melanotheron. Individuals were collected at 8 different sites in Senegal covering a salinity gradient from 3 to 104 parts per thousand, and showing large disparities in their organic pollutant concentrations. Results showed that the gut of S. melanotheron is home to a highly abundant viral community (0.2-10.7 x 10(9) viruses ml(-1)), distinct from the surrounding water, and essentially composed of phages of which a substantial proportion is temperate (the fraction of lysogenized cells-FLC ranging from 8.1 to 33.0%). Also, a positive and significant correlation was detected between FLC and the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon in sediment, while no clear relationships were found between salinity and any of the microbial parameters considered. Finally, our data suggest that virus-bacteria interactions within the fish intestine are likely sensitive to the presence of particular xenobiotics, which may compromise the balance in the gut microbiota, and subsequently affect the health of their host.  
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  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium  
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  Numéro d'Appel MARBEC @ alain.herve @ collection (down) 2389  
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Auteur Gaboriau, T.; Leprieur, F.; Mouillot, D.; Hubert, N. doi  openurl
  Titre Influence of the geography of speciation on current patterns of coral reef fish biodiversity across the Indo-Pacific Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Ecography  
  Volume 41 Numéro 8 Pages 1295-1306  
  Mots-Clés damselfishes pomacentridae; evolutionary history; family labridae; global patterns; marine biodiversity; maximum-likelihood; peripheral endemism; phylogenies; species richness; west pacific  
  Résumé The role of speciation processes in shaping current biodiversity patterns represents a major scientific question for ecologists and biogeographers. Hence, numerous methods have been developed to determine the geography of speciation based on co-occurrence between sister-species. Most of these methods rely on the correlation between divergence time and several metrics based on the geographic ranges of sister-taxa (i.e. overlap, asymmetry). The relationship between divergence time and these metrics has scarcely been examined in a spatial context beyond regression curves. Mapping this relationship across spatial grids, however, may unravel how speciation processes have shaped current biodiversity patterns through space and time. This can be particularly relevant for coral reef fishes of the Indo-Pacific since the origin of the exceptional concentration of biodiversity in the Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA) has been actively debated, with several alternative hypotheses involving species diversification and dispersal. We reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships between three species-rich families of coral reef fish (Chaetodontidae, Labridae, Pomacentridae) and calculated co-occurrence metrics between closely related lineages of those families. We demonstrated that repeated biogeographic processes can be identified in present-day species distribution by projecting co-occurrence metrics between related lineages in a geographical context. Our study also evidence that sister-species do not co-occur randomly across the Indo-Pacific, but tend to overlap their range within the IAA. We identified the imprint of two important biogeographic processes that caused this pattern in 48% of the sister-taxa considered: speciation events within the IAA and repeated divergence between the Indian and Pacific Ocean, with subsequent secondary contact in the IAA.  
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Auteur Tribot, A.-S.; Carabeux, Q.; Deter, J.; Claverie, T.; Villeger, S.; Mouquet, N. doi  openurl
  Titre Confronting species aesthetics with ecological functions in coral reef fish Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Sci Rep  
  Volume 8 Numéro Pages 11733  
  Mots-Clés appeal; diversity; ecosystem services; experience  
  Résumé The biodiversity crisis has spurred scientists to assess all facets of biodiversity so that stakeholders can establish protection programs. However, species that are perceived as beautiful receive more attention than less attractive species. This dynamic could have tremendous consequences on people's willingness to preserve biodiversity. Coral reefs might be particularly affected by this issue as they are key ecosystems that provide many services, such as aesthetic and cultural benefits attracting millions of tourists each year. Here we show the results of an online photographic questionnaire completed by 8,000 participants whereby preferences were assessed for a set of 116 reef fishes. Based on these preferences, we compared the functional richness, i.e. the amount of functional space filled, by groups of fishes based on their perceived attractiveness. We present evidence indicating that the least attractive coral reef fishes have a much higher functional richness than the most attractive species. Our results highlight the extent to which species aesthetic values' may be disconnected from their ecological values and could be misleading for conservation purposes. There is thus an urgent need to increase the attention of scientists and the general public towards less attractive species to better appreciate and protect the species that crucially support functional diversity in endangered ecosystems.  
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  ISSN 2045-2322 ISBN Médium  
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Auteur Oikonomou, A.; Leprieur, F.; Leonardos, I.D. doi  openurl
  Titre Ecomorphological diversity of freshwater fishes as a tool for conservation priority setting: a case study from a Balkan hotspot Type Article scientifique
  Année 2018 Publication Revue Abrégée Environ. Biol. Fishes  
  Volume 101 Numéro 7 Pages 1121-1136  
  Mots-Clés assemblages; Balkan peninsula; communities; Conservation; Ecomorphology; environmental-factors; Freshwater fishes; functional diversity; future challenges; habitat gradients; life-history strategies; Originality; species richness; stream; traits  
  Résumé Biodiversity studies commonly focus on taxonomic diversity measures such as species richness and abundance. However, alternative measures based on ecomorphological traits are also critical for unveiling the processes shaping biodiversity and community assembly along environmental gradients. Our study presents the first analysis of habitat-trait-community structure in a Balkan biodiversity hotspot (Louros river, NW Greece), through the investigation of the relationships among freshwater fish assemblages' composition, morphological traits and habitat features. In order to provide a hierarchical classification of species' priority to protection measures, we highlight the most ecomorphologically distinct species using originality analysis. Our results suggest that the longitudinal changes of habitat variables (water temperature, depth, substrate, altitude) drive the local fish assemblages' structure highlighting the upstream-downstream gradient. We also present evidence for environmental filtering, establishing fish assemblages according to their ecomorphological traits. The calculation of the seven available indices of ecomorphological originality indicates that Valencia letourneuxi and Cobitis hellenica, which are endemic to Louros and threatened with extinction, exhibited the highest distinctiveness; thus their protection is of great importance. The methodological approach followed and the patterns described herein can contribute further to the application of community ecology theory to conservation, highlighting the need to use ecomorphological traits as a useful 'tool'.  
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